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LEED v2009
Commercial Interiors
Innovation in Design
Innovation in Design

LEED CREDIT

CI-2009 IDc1: Innovation in Design 1-5 points

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Tristan Roberts

LEED AP BD+C, LFA

Quill Nook Farm
HPDC Technical Director

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Credit language

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Requirements

Credit can be achieved through any combination of the Innovation in design and Exemplary performance paths as described below:

Path 1. Innovation in design (1-5 points)
Achieve significant, measurable environmental performance using a strategy not addressed in the LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors Rating System. One point is awarded for each innovation achieved. No more than 5 points under IDc1 may be earned through Path 1—Innovation in design. Identify the following in writing:
  • The intent of the proposed innovation credit.
  • The proposed requirement for compliance.
  • The proposed submittals to demonstrate compliance.
  • The design approach (strategies) used to meet the requirements.
Path 2. Exemplary performance (1-3 points)
Achieve exemplary performance in an existing LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors prerequisite or credit that allows exemplary performance as specified in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Interior Design, 2009 Edition. An exemplary performance point may be earned for achieving double the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold of an existing credit in LEED. One point is awarded for each exemplary performance achieved. No more than 3 points under IDc1 may be earned through Path 2—Exemplary performance.
Path 3. Pilot credit (1-5 points)
Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library at www.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant and complete the required documentation. Projects may pursue up to 5 pilot credits total.
Credit substitution available
You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.
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What does it cost?

Cost estimates for this credit

On each BD+C v4 credit, LEEDuser offers the wisdom of a team of architects, engineers, cost estimators, and LEED experts with hundreds of LEED projects between then. They analyzed the sustainable design strategies associated with each LEED credit, but also to assign actual costs to those strategies.

Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

This information is also available in a full PDF download in The Cost of LEED v4 report.

Learn more about The Cost of LEED v4 »

Frequently asked questions

Our project wants to (fill in the blank) as an innovative strategy. Is this eligible for IDc1?

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Addenda

4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Below the text of the "PATH 2" section text, insert the following section:Path 3. Pilot Credit (1 point)Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library atwww.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant andcomplete the required documentation. Projects may pursue more than 1pilot credit; however, a maximum of 1 point will be awarded.(Please note that this section was updated on Februrary 2, 2011).
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the header, change "(1 point)" to "(1 - 5 Points)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Below the text of the "PATH 2" section text, insert the following section:Path 3. Pilot Credit (1 point)Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library atwww.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant andcomplete the required documentation. Projects may pursue more than 1pilot credit; however, a maximum of 1 point will be awarded.(Please note that this section was updated on Februrary 2, 2011).
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the header, change "(1 point)" to "(1 - 5 Points)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Replace the last sentence of the paragraph with "Projects may pursue up to 5 Pilot Credits total."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the last sentence of the paragraph with "Projects may pursue up to 5 Pilot Credits total."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/7/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The IT department proposes moving the current server network to a virtual server network. The move would produce immediate benefits to both the IT department and Harris construction as a whole. Virtualization is a proven software technology that is rapidly transforming the IT landscape and fundamentally changing the way that people compute. Today\'s powerful x86 computer hardware was originally designed to run only a single operating system and a single application, but virtualization breaks that bond, making it possible to run multiple operating systems and multiple applications on the same computer at the same time, increasing the utilization and flexibility of hardware. In essence, virtualization lets us transform hardware into software. The use of software such as VMware ESX will allow us to transform or "virtualize" the hardware resources of an x86-based computer-including the CPU, RAM, hard disk and network controller-to create a fully functional virtual machine that can run its own operating system and applications just like a "real" computer. Multiple virtual machines share hardware resources without interfering with each other so that you can safely run several operating systems and applications at the same time on a single computer. Power Consumption Energy consumption is a critical issue for Harris IT today, whether the goal is to reduce cost, save the environment or keep our datacenter running. In the United States alone, datacenters consumed $4.5 billion worth of electricity in 2006. Industry analyst Gartner1 estimates that over the next 5 years, most enterprise data centers will spend as much on energy (power and cooling) as they do on hardware infrastructure. Virtualization allows us to reduce our energy costs and consumption by 80%. Most servers and desktops today are in use only 8-15% of the time they are powered on, yet most hardware consumes 60-90% of the normal workload power even when idle. VMware virtualization has advanced resource and memory management features that enable consolidation ratios of 15:1 or more which increase hardware utilization to as much as 85%. Once virtualized, a new feature of VMware Distributed Resource Scheduler (DRS) called Distributed Power Management (DPM) monitors utilization across the datacenter and intelligently powers off unneeded physical servers without impacting applications and users. With VMware virtualization we can dramatically reduce energy consumption without sacrificing reliability or service levels. Reduce the Environmental Impact of IT For Harris this equates to every server virtualized, we can save about 7,000 kilowatt hours, or four tons of CO2 emissions, every year. This means our 12 servers could be reduced to 4 servers through virtualization. The reduction in servers along with the savings in electricity with the reduced cooling requirements equate to as savings of 49,000 kilowatt hours, or 28 tons of CO2 emissions every year. Currently 60 cents of every dollar spent for data center energy is used for cooling equipment and not powering it. Conclusion In short the five major reasons to virtualize the Harris IT servers are: Server Consolidation and Infrastructure Optimization: Virtualization makes it possible to achieve significantly higher resource utilization by pooling common infrastructure resources and breaking the legacy "one application to one server" model. Physical Infrastructure Cost Reduction: With virtualization, we can reduce the number of servers and related IT hardware in the data center. This leads to reductions in real estate, power and cooling requirements, resulting in significantly lower IT costs. Improved Operational Flexibility & Responsiveness: Virtualization offers a new way of managing IT infrastructure and can help IT administrators spend less time on repetitive tasks such as provisioning, configuration, monitoring and maintenance. Increased Application Availability & Improved Business Continuity: Eliminate planned downtime and recover quickly from unplanned outages with the ability to securely backup and migrate entire virtual environments with no interruption in service. Improved Desktop Manageability & Security: Deploy, manage and monitor secure desktop environments that end users can access locally or remotely, with or without a network connection, on almost any standard desktop, laptop or tablet PC. Virtualization is a technology that can benefit Harris Construction. The employment of virtualization solutions will reduce IT costs while increasing the efficiency, utilization and flexibility of their existing computer hardware.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting confirmation that the implementation of virtualization in data centers may be considered for an innovation in design credit. Virtualization is a software technology that allows servers to run multiple operating systems on one server at a time. The strategies outlined in the request primarily focus on increased resource utilization, increased operational and application flexibility, and improving manageability and security, among other things. Other savings are just a by-product of the technology. This is not eligible for innovation in design credit. A similar CIR has been posted related to data transfer media dated 9/30/2008, under NCv2.1. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

DESCRIPTION Proposed achievement of this credit involves production of a fifteen minute video overview of the resort\'s LEED and green features. INTENT Previous rulings have indicated a minimum of two of the following solutions were required to achieve a point for public education within the Innovation and Design category: - Comprehensive signage program - Development of a manual, guideline, or case study - Educational outreach program or guided tour It is the intent of this CIR to seek a ruling that would permit the use of digital media (i.e., video) to serve, as an alternate path to all of the above. REQUIREMENTS Utilize digital media to expand upon the delivery of public education through: - Providing context to the LEED plaque (to be located in the lobby) by playing back the video on a flat screen adjacent to the plaque. This will provide expansive meaning to a plaque that will be viewed by thousands of people each year - including many who are not familiar with USGBC or LEED. Additionally, this would also reduce the traditional use of lobby paper products to tell the green story. Such paper products can sometimes go underutilized and/or are quickly discarded. - Educating visitors on the LEED and non-LEED green attributes of the resort by the daily and multiple playbacks (minimum 4 times each day) of the video on the resort\'s dedicated in-room television channel. This would achieve USGBC\'s goal of educating visitors to the project. - Educating new employees by playback of the video as part of their initial training and orientation. This would achieve USGBC\'s goal of educating employees. - Reaching a larger audience beyond those traveling to the resort by featuring the video on the resort\'s website and the corporation\'s environmental initiatives website. In essence the video provides a virtual, as opposed to physical guided tour, of the project without expanding facilities unnecessarily in order to conduct tours of the back of house physical plant. This would complement USGBC\'s goal of sharing the successes of this project with others who may not have the opportunity to visit the project. SUBMITTALS LEED Design Application Milestone: - Proposed location of lobby LEED plaque and adjacent flat screen - Story treatment/synopsis LEED Construction Application Milestone submittals would include: - Shooting script - Shooting schedule - Schedule of daily playback on the in-room resort channel - Web address/proposed design for the resort and environmental affairs websites that would host the video.

Ruling:

The proposed innovation credit is based on using digital media, in the form of a video, which will provide information about the green features of the building. While commendable, this approach alone does not substantiate a comprehensive green education program to warrant achievement of an innovation credit. An additional strategy should be adopted, and must be actively instructional, such as an educational outreach program or guided tour, or a comprehensive signage program built into the building\'s respective spaces. Please refer to the established requirements for this as noted in the LEED-NC v2.1 CIR ruling dated 09/24/2001. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/3/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Design for Increased Physical Activity Credit Intent: The obesity epidemic is a major health crisis facing the American public, leading to the increased incidence of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease among other ailments. Increased physical activity, as little as two minutes of stair climbing each day, could significantly reduce the rate of obesity in the country. Extensive studies by the Center for Disease Control and other independent researchers* have shown that there are four major elements of building design which encourage greater physical activity: A) Stairs - Signage prompts encouraging the use of the stairs. - Improved stairwell aesthetics through use of color, artwork, music, etc. - Favored central locations for stairwells. B) Access to exercise facilities - Weekly exercise classes - On-site walking trails - Gym or exercise room C) Improved streetscapes - Sidewalks/traffic safety - Comfort lighting - Aesthetic landscaping D) Community location - Urban density - Mixed use - Connectivity of pathways to destinations *Full text of these reports is available via email as files cannot be posted with CIRs. Credit Requirements As LEED already accounts for the items listed in C & D, we propose that the ID credit be earned through meeting 4 of the 6 items listed in A & B. Submittal A LEED-Online letter template including the project compliance narrative and floor plans highlighting the design elements included. Project Approach The Riverside Health Center is a partial renovation and addition project that will provide the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene with a contemporary facility to serve their Health Academy, Nutrition, Primary Care Clinic, STD Clinic, Family Daycare, and School Health programs. The building design will include a centrally located stair, signage prompts containing info on the benefits of taking the stairs. The stairwell itself has been enlarged to encourage greater use, will feature added ventilation, operable windows, and is to be included as a site for expressing the project\'s 1% for the arts. The 1% for arts is a city funded program that matches 1% of a project\'s construction budget towards a public art project. In addition to fulfilling all three stairwell improvements, the building features an exercise room, will offer weekly yoga classes, and includes an on-site community garden with landscaped pathways to encourage outdoor exercise.

Ruling:

Along with statistical data, additions to your approach could earn you an innovation credit. Currently, while the overall intent is laudable, it is unlikely that the proposal described above would earn an innovation credit. To earn an innovation credit, project teams must demonstrate innovative performance in Green Building categories not specifically addressed by the rating system. An example to enhance the approach might include design of the site to ensure that there are sidewalks of some minimum width to promote walking. These innovations need to be comprehensive in nature and have significant, measurable environmental benefits. This proposal focuses on fitness, health, and lifestyle related issues that are generally considered outside the scope of the LEED Rating system; LEED does promote productivity and overall wellness of building occupants. In addition, as written, it is unclear how the project team would demonstrate quantitative performance improvements for environmental benefit (establishing a baseline of standard performance for comparison to the final design). Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/29/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Activated Carbon Filters for Low-Cost Demand Control Ventilation and Energy Efficiency This CIR proposes an innovation design credit for a suite of design features and a design procedure that will reduce the cost of demand controlled ventilation (DCV). The procedure is based on a combination of: scrubbing the air with activated charcoal (AC) filters to reduce the number of critical rooms in a building that will require CO2 sensors; using air-to-air heat recovery for the building air: using time-of--day control of ventilation for the building zones. The proposed design procedure will enable selecting the minimum number of CO2 sensors to control the amount of delivered outside air. This will reduce the initial cost as well as the annual cost of maintaining their calibration. The new Pacific Garden Mission building in Chicago will house an average of 800 homeless people on any given night. The design calls for using activated carbon filters in the main air handling unit for the entire building to help control the peculiarly strong body odors of the guests and to reduce the required outside air and associated energy use. Three "hot boxes" will also be used to disinfect by 180oF+ heat all the clothes of the incoming guests as part of the thorough laundry process. The activated carbon filters are capable of reducing these outdoor air rates by over 70%. This was determined by applying the Indoor Air Quality procedure described in Section 6.2 of ASHRAE Standard 62-1999 Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality1 To be conservative, we will assume that only a 50% reduction in outside air will be feasible because additional outdoor air may be necessary to control body odors by dilution. Besides reducing the cost of conditioning the ventilation air an additional benefit of the activated carbon filters will be to help reduce the number of CO2 sensors needed in the building for effective and affordable demand control ventilation. By reducing the required outside air by 50% the number of "critical rooms" is reduced. We define "critical rooms" as the rooms having a required minimum fraction of outside air, say 0.50, as calculated using the Ventilation Rate Procedure for multiple spaces and the Indoor Air Quality Procedure in ASHRAE 62,2-20012. The rationale for not installing CO2 sensors in rooms with outdoor air fractions below a specific number, say 0.50, is: 1. if regularly occupied rooms with outdoor air fractions above 0.50 are getting sufficient outside air, the rooms with lower fractions should automatically get sufficient outside air. 2. one air handling unit serves the entire PGM building. Therefore, a small number of CO2 sensors can control the outdoor air fraction throughout the building. (The air handler is equipped with multiple fans--their redundancy makes it acceptable to serve a building this size, approx. 118,580sf net interior floor area with one air handler.) 3. The design will also include air-to-air heat recovery at the main air handling unit using either run-around-coils or heat pipes. 4. For major parts of the day CO2 sensor control of the supply and outside air quantities for particular space will be overridden by direct time-of-day control by the central EMS. The building program is arranged so that during the daytime the lower two floors will be occupied and conditioned for occupancy. The upper two floors are dormitories that will be unoccupied and their environment will be kept at unoccupied settings, including just enough supply air to slightly pressurize these floors relative to the outside. Conversely during the evening hours, the lower two floors will be unoccupied and their environment will be kept at unoccupied settings with the minimal required supply air to temper the space and control building pressurization. The central EMS will be used to control the supply air to these large blocks of the building. (This will also allow using a very low diversity factor to size the main air handling unit since it will be used to condition about 1/2 of the building at any one time.) 5. The limiting factor in determining the minimum acceptable amount of outside air may very well be the perception of odors by the occupants. This may require higher amounts of outside for dilution of odors than what would be called for by the CO2 sensor. This will be determined empirically after occupancy begins. In summary, the above design features and program requirements make it possible to reduce the number of CO2 sensors at this job by at least 50%. This will be documented in the summary table of the Ventilation Rate Procedure analysis. As such, the use of activated carbon filters makes demand controlled ventilation economically viable. Our first question is whether the above package of design features and approach is acceptable for reducing the number of required CO2 sensors and the cost of DCV and whether this would be considered an Innovation in Design and suitable for receiving a a LEED credit. Our second question is whether we can calculate the energy savings due to the activated carbon filters using the same analysis method approved for demand control ventilation. The % reduction due to the DCV would be calculated by subtracting saved energy from DCV in the numerator and using the Base Case energy cost without DCV in the denominator. Our preliminary energy modeling indicates annual savings of at least $10,000 per year or about 5% of the projected energy costs of the Current Design. These savings would be included under EA Credit 1 Optimize Energy Performance. We look forward to the USGBC\'s comments on this potential innovation in design and on the savings calculation method for the activated carbon filters. 1. ASHRAE 62.2-1999 Section 6.2 and Appendix E 2. ASHRAE 62.2-1999 Section 6.1.3.1 Ventilation Procedure for Multiple Spaces

Ruling:

Based on the description provided, it does not appear that there are additional environmental benefits from this design approach that would qualify for an Innovation in Design credit, for the following reasons. LEED requires compliance with the Standard 62 using the Ventilation Rate Procedure (VRP). Reducing outdoor air rates is only allowed using the Standard\'s Indoor Air Quality Procedure. To comply with EQp1, outdoor air rates cannot be lower than those prescribed by the VRP, whether charcoal filters are used or not. Unfortunately the VRP tables do not have a category for "homeless centers." If they did, the rates would be quite high given the source strength. The closest occupancy in terms of body odor source strength is a "health club/weight room" which requires 20 cfm/p plus 0.06 cfm/ft2. In any case, the designers may have to request help from ASHRAE SSPC 62.1. Based on EQp1, the ASHRAE 62 Indoor Air Quality Procedure cannot be used to reduce ventilation rates. CO2 sensors should be used to monitor air quality; an alternative method for monitoring air quality has not been substituted outside of manual control in response to odors. EQc1 requires CO2 monitoring in densely occupied areas for air handlers serving multiple spaces with varying occupancy. As long as your design meets this requirement, then it will qualify for a point under EQc1. CO2 DCV must be customized to this application since the project requires a much higher ventilation rate compared to the activity level. The standard assumptions used in determining CO2 setpoints assume CO2 concentration tracks bio-effluent concentration and that bioeffluent/CO2 emission rate tracks activity level. This works for typical projects, but it would not be true for a homeless center. The project team may want to reconsider application of CO2/DCV for this project. Under EAc1, the ASHRAE 90.1 methodology calls for the same outdoor air rate for both the budget and proposed building. If DCV is used on this project, the energy savings can be demonstrated through the "exceptional calculation method" allowed by the standard. The energy cost savings would be included in EAc1. Strategies such as CO2 and humidity monitoring are addressed under existing credits within the LEED Rating System. Please note that another issue unrelated to Standard 62 is disease control. Homeless people are often carriers of disease (e.g. TB) and can be highly susceptible due to health conditions. In this case, the recirculation of any air in a homeless center may not be desirable. While very good particle filters (e.g. MERV 15) can remove most bacteria and droplet nuclei carrying viruses. 100% outdoor air with heat recovery may be a better solution. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/28/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Green Advantage certification

Ruling:

USGBC has assessed the Green Advantage certification program against our established requirements for recognition in LEED and found Green Advantage to be in compliance. As such, LEED project teams who comply with the following requirements are eligible for award of 1 Innovation point for LEED v4, and 2009 BD&C and LEED-NC v2.2 projects:1. Prior to and throughout the construction phase of the project, 30% of the General Contractor\'s or Construction Manager\'s personnel will be Green Advantage Certified. Personnel must be actively involved in the day-to-day activities and of the following classifications as applicable: a. Contractorb. Construction Manager including Project Executivec. Project Manager d. Project Engineer e. Quality Control Managerf. Mechanical/ Electrical/Plumbing (MEP) Coordinatorg. Superintendenth. Assistant Superintendent i. General Foreman2. Prior to and throughout the construction phase of the project, 30% of Subcontractor personnel will be Green Advantage Certified. Personnel must be actively involved in the day-to-day activities and of the following classifications: a. Project Managerb. Superintendentc. Project Engineerd. Quality Control Managere. General Foremanf. Trade Foreman(removed 4/1/2011: Architect\'s on site representative)Note that this LEED Interpretation is in line with the guidance for \'Recognition of Third Party Personnel Credentials and Certifications in LEED\', which can be found at usgbc.org and is also linked below.added 4/1/2011:Submittals:1. Provide a complete list, aggregating General Contractor\'s and Construction Manager\'s personnel, noting each person\'s role in the project and who is Green Advantage Certified. (For multiple-prime contracts, provide separate lists for the Construction Manager and each Prime Contractor.) Calculate the percentage of Green Advantage Certified personnel. 2. Provide a complete list, aggregating Subcontractors\' personnel, noting each person\'s role in the project and who is Green Advantage Certified. (For multiple-prime contracts, provide separate lists for each Prime Contractor\'s Subcontractors.) Calculate the percentage of Green Advantage Certified personnel. 3. For each Green Advantage Certified individual, provide a copy of the Green Advantage certificate. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/21/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project scope is unique in that the building owner will also be the primary tenant of building and is currently seeking certification under LEED Core & Shell for the overall base building tower, while simultaneously pursuing LEED for Commercial Interiors for the one-half portion within the building they will occupy. In this scenario it is unclear exactly how to address certain credit requirements for a Commercial Interiors project when the space will be located within a Core & Shell building concurrently pursuing the same related credits. There is a below grade parking structure is intended to serve the entire masterplan (not just our building) with 2,151 parking spaces. The total parking associated with both LEED projects is equal to 1,500 parking spaces, with 750 allocated to CS and the other 750 allocated CI. The LEED CS credit requires either preferred parking for 5%, OR refueling stations for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles for 3% based on the total parking capacity of the site. However LEED CI does not offer an equivalent credit for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles and therefore we are requesting that the calculations for this LEED CS credit to be based on the parking available only to the Core and Shell tenants of the building, or 750 spaces. Our goal is to not penalize the Core and Shell project since it is known that half of the parking is allotted to the LEED Commercial Interiors project, for which no such credit for low emitting & fuel efficient vehicles is offered. Alternatively, if we were to calculate this credit in accordance with the LEED NC v2.2 requirements it would require either 75 preferred parking spaces, or 45 stations (or a combination of the two) be incorporated into the total allocated parking. By addressing the equivalent LEED NC compliance path, would it be fair to assume that 1) the LEED CS project would earn this point, AND 2) the LEED CI project could earn a potential Innovation & Design point as well?

Ruling:

1. In order for the CS project (in its entirety) to achieve this credit, all 1,500 parking spaces dedicated to the project must be used for calculations. As the CS requirement take into consideration total vehicle parking capacity, the CI parking spaces cannot be taken out of the calculations, to determine either the number of preferred parking spaces for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles or the number of refueling stations. The requirements for these calculations are the same for LEED-CS and LEED-NC v2.2. 2. The CI project would potentially be able to earn an innovation point for the achievement of this credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/13/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This CIR is being submitted to assess whether this proposed ID credit may qualify for a point assuming that all proposed standards are met and all documentation is made. ID Credit Title: Low-Emitting Exterior Materials: Paints and Coatings Narrative Statement of Credit Intent: Reduce the quantity of air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers. Increase the demand for Low VOC materials for exterior applications. Narrative Statement Describing Credit Requirements: Paints and coating used on the exterior of the building shall comply with following standards: Architectural paints, stains and coatings. Do not exceed VOC limits set by Green Seal Standard GS-11 - Flats - 50 g/L - Non-Flats / Primers - 150g/L Anti-corrosive paints, stains, and coatings. Do not exceed VOC limits set by Green Seal Standard GS-03. - 250 g/L Clear wood finishes, floor coatings, stains, and shellacs. Do not exceed VOC limits set by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) Rule 1113 - Clear wood finishes: varnish 350 g/L; lacquer 550 g/L - Floor Coatings: 100 g/L - Sealers: waterproofing sealers 250 g/L; sanding sealers 275 g/L; all other sealers 200 g/L - Shellacs: clear 730 g/L; pigmented 550 g/L - Stains: 250 g/L Narrative Describing Project\'s Approach to the Credit: Require all exterior paint applications to meet the same standards as for interior paint applications. Exterior paint applications will include but are not limited to exterior hollow metal doors, soffits, fascias, metal roof touch-up, metal cap flashings, metal lintels, and vent grating. The coating for our metal roof will be a factory applied finish.

Ruling:

The strategy proposed for earning an Innovation in Design credit for Low-Emitting Exterior Materials: Paints and Coatings has merit. In order to achieve this credit, the approach must be comprehensive in nature and include VOC limits for concrete sealants and caulks, exterior paints, wood stains and sealers, and metal stains and sealers. Please refer to the LEED NCv2.2 IDc1.1 CIR ruling dated 10/23/2006 as well as LEED EB: Operations & Management SSc2 for further guidance on how to approach this credit in a comprehensive manner. The first item in the Materials Selection section of the LEED ID Credit Catalogue (Page 19) offers general guidance for VOC content in material selection when applying for an ID credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
3/15/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Prior to submitting the full Template and supporting documentation for this Innovation & Design Process Credit, we would like to request an evaluation to ensure we are on the right path for this credit. Our project is a mixed-use facility with residential units at 7 levels, retail at the ground level and parking below grade. We plan to integrate an Educational Outreach Program, following the guidelines as defined in IDc1.1 inquiry dated 9-20-01. The following is the Outline of our Program: I. Interpretive Signage Program A signage permanent signage program will be designed and installed to communicate the major sustainable design aspects of the project to the visitors and customers of the facility, highlighting the various sections of the LEED program - Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Materials and Resources, Energy & Atmosphere and Indoor Environmental Quality a. Retail - Signs to be located at the Paseo area between the two buildings and will highlight the sustainable design features of the project, including: 1. Water Efficiency - reduced water consumption and irrigation by captured ground water 2. Stormwater reduction and Heat Island reduction: Rooftop gardens and Green Roof - reduces Stormwater quantity, reduces heat islands at the roof and provides the residents with a gardening plot. 3. Recycled materials & low VOC materials as well as Construction waste diversion from landfills. 4. Alternative Transportation - preferred parking for HOV, secured bicycle parking for residents, adjacency to bus stops and ferry service. A signage program will be designed and installed to communicate energy and water efficiency data on a monthly basis to the residents. The intent is to encourage residents to make a concerted effort towards reducing energy and water consumption. b. Residential - Signs to be located at Residential Common Lobby Areas II. Project Manual for Sustainable Design features for the project a. Manual will include narratives and supporting graphics documenting the design approach for the 5 sections of the LEED NC v2.2 Submission b. The LEED Checklist and Templates submitted to the USGBC will be included in this Manual for reference by others. III. Educational Outreach Program a. The Home Owners Association will sponsor Educational Programs (Organic Gardening, Organic Cooking, Sustainable Living Practices, Energy Consumption Reduction) will be held at the facility in the meeting room for residents to further their awareness of sustainable living.

Ruling:

The provided description has met the precedent set forth in CIR Ruling dated 9/24/01. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/30/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

It appears that most data centers that have recently pursued LEED certification have been successful using a \'mixed use\' model, in which the data center is a component of a larger office building. Based on this model and the definition of \'Process Load\' in ASHRAE Standard 90.1-99 ("energy consumed in support of a manufacturing, industrial or commercial process other than conditioning spaces and maintaining comfort and amenities for the occupants of a building"), it is our interpretation that the energy required to power and cool the data center electronics is not included in the baseline energy calculation under the Energy & Atmosphere credit category. (Ref: CIR 4/11/2003 and Ruling 5/5/2003). This leads us to believe that an appropriate venue for credit contribution associated with data center energy reduction initiatives is in the Innovation & Design category. With the rise in bandwidth requirements, optical fiber versus copper has significant energy savings advantages. Energy savings associated with power and cooling of a 10Gbyte/s optical network vs. 10G copper network can range from 75-85% depending on port count. Further, innovative high fiber count pre-terminated optical solutions vs. traditional patch-cord solutions reduce cabling congestion and optimize air flow in the server racks and raceways further reducing cooling energy requirements. Will Innovation & Design credits be considered for the following? 1. Installed cabling infrastructure that provides improved energy efficiency over another. 2. A Pre-Terminated high fiber count optical solution vs. Patch-Cord optical solution.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting confirmation whether the installation of more efficient network components (i.e., high fiber count pre-terminated optical connections) in data centers may be considered for an innovation in design credit. Copper based data transfer media is increasingly being replaced by fiber optic lines in the data transfer industry. As such, the proposed strategies are not innovative strategies for energy savings, and are therefore not eligible to achieve an innovation in design credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/26/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The commercial office project is designed and constructed to achieve various LEED NC 2.2 credits. The project is located in Providence, Rhode Island. We are seeking an innovation in design credit (ID) for a Comprehensive Transportation plan based on the ID credit previously approved on 5/9/2003 The INTENT of this innovation credit is to provide occupants of the building additional options for Alternative Transportation and reduce the drive alone trips through the use of a Transportation Management Plan set forth by the Owner. The project is currently pursuing three SS 4 baseline credits including: a. Project is located within 1/4 mile of Bus service and directly across the street from train station. Direct route into Boston also. b. Bicycle Storage and shower facility is provided for employees. c. Preferred Parking is provided for low emitting/ fuel efficient vehicles. Please note that the project locations offers bus service beyond 2 lines [ >50 lines available from this location ]. In addition, the train station offers a direct line to the airport. The Comprehensive Transportation Plan will include the following additional elements: a. The employer is providing free bus passes to 30% of the employees [equivalent of 300 passes]. b. The Rhode Island Public Transportation Authority [RIPTA] provides a number of transportation amenities/ alternates for its residents and information on the same will be available through the employer\'s intranet. Information and amenities include: 1. Maps/ schedules/ contact info for Public Transportation 2. Information on incentives provided by RIPTA includes: a. RIPTA/Google Trip Planner b. Carpools: carpooling options c. Commuter services Submittals will include: a. Copy of RIPTA pamphlet outlining available public transportation amenities. b. Commitment letter from the employer to provide 300 public transportation passes.

Ruling:

Innovation credits are awarded during the certification process, not through the CIR process. This ruling is to provide guidance about the likely measures and documentation that would need to be included in the credit application. This CIR is being submitted based on the merits of a Transportation Management Plan that will be instituted by the administration of the building. The program is part of the owner\'s efforts to reduce drive alone trips. This inquiry has utilized IDc1.1 CIR ruling dated 5/9/2003 as a basis for its program requirements. As presented in this inquiry, the Transportation Management Plan does not meet the standards established in the referenced CIR. The CIR of 5/9/2003 presented a comprehensive TMP that included the following elements: Rideshare Matching Assistance, Subsidized Regional Transit Pass ( In lieu of providing 3% with Alternative Fuel Vehicles ), Bike Subsidy and User Groups, Amtrak Subsidy, and a Guaranteed Ride Home Program. The above noted program provides a less comprehensive package, providing only bus passes for a percentage of total employees and information on nearby mass transportation options. Additional provisions should be included, such as passes for a larger percentage of employees, rail transit subsidies and programs for carsharing, bikesharing, and vanpools. In order to meet the standards of CIR 5/9/2003 the existing program would need to be expanded. Alternatively, the project team could investigate an exemplary performance Innovation & Design credit for SSc4.1 As described, the project is in the direct vicinity of multiple mass transit options. The exemplary performance guidelines for SSc4.1 are available in the LEED v2.2 reference guide. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/27/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

AMD\'s new Austin Campus will include a "Halo Studio", a virtual meeting room that is equipped with the latest telepresence technology and is optimized for video collaboration between globally dispersed teams. AMD\'s telepresence system will utilize broadcast-quality cameras and optics to deliver seamless, no perceived delay collaboration around the world, eliminating the need for airplane and automobile travel for in-person meetings. Telepresence recreates face-to-face meetings virtually so employees and partners can build relationships, review products and documents and make decisions faster without leaving their offices. Halo users can interrupt one another, express their emotional reactions when they feel them, and otherwise, act as they would in a regular face-to-face meeting. The end result: everyone feels as if they are in the same room, when in reality, they may be thousands of miles away on different continents. By reducing employee travel, these systems minimize the greenhouse gas footprint for Halo-enabled buildings while improving worker productivity, satisfaction and health. In addition, Halo rooms use US EPA Energy Star rated plasma displays and revert to standby mode when not in use, reducing energy use by 40%. AMD\'s offices are spread around the country and around the world. "Americans make more than 405 million long-distance [over 50 miles] business trips per year, accounting for 16% of all long-distance travel" (from "America on the Go", U.S. Department of Transportation Bureau of Transportation Statistics, October 2003). Halo rooms have the potential to significantly reduce the number of long-distance trips made by business travelers and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions. Bill McGee writes in USA Today of a Consumer Reports study on carbon footprints for air travel: "We used 11 leading carbon calculators to assess our footprint using the standard measurement of pounds of CO2. For a flight from New York to Los Angeles, we found that one passenger generated anywhere from 1,924 pounds to 6,732 pounds." (from "On the Road with Bill McGee", USA Today, online: http://www.usatoday.com/travel/columnist/mcgee/2008-01-30-fuzzy-math_N.htm) These statistics indicate that a single "Halo Studio" meeting with a mix of attendees from around the country and within Austin can divert roughly 15,512 lbs. or 7.8 tons of CO2. Over the course of a year, this single "Halo Studio" could divert hundreds or even thousands of tons of CO2. (Calculation: 4 cross-country round trip plane flights= 1,924 lbs. CO2 x 2 trips x 4 attendees = 15,392 lbs. CO2; 4 short distance car trips = 15 lbs CO2 per mile x 2 trips x 4 attendees = 120 lbs. CO2; total = 15,392 + 120 = 15,512 lbs. CO2) Telepresence systems are offered by several companies including Hewlett-Packard, Cisco, Teliris and Polycom. AMD\'s Halo system was developed by Hewlett-Packard. These systems are distinct from traditional videoconferencing due to the immersive quality of communication provided by the telepresence solutions. For example, the offerings from HP utilize multiple display screens, broadcast quality cameras, a fiber optic network and include technology that enable people to connect to multiple sites around the world at the same time, offering everyone a "same-room" communication experience. There are up front investment requirements, including the cost of the studios (pricing varies depending on the type of telepresence solution, but top of the line HP studios, for example, list for $349,000 USD per studio) and some systems also have a monthly service fees. We would like to establish a precedent Innovation in Design credit that recognizes telepresence technology and significant efforts to reduce the ecological footprint of meetings in standard business practice. Is this an appropriate innovation credit?

Ruling:

The concept of virtual meetings, either via conference calls, or other technological means, has become common practice for organizations located in multiple locations. While the telepresence technology is a superior way to facilitate meetings remotely, it does not directly relate to design and construction, but addresses operational practices for a company. Innovation credits are awarded to projects for exceptional performance above the requirements set by the LEED Rating System, or innovative performance in green building categories not specifically addressed by the LEED Rating System. As the use of this technology appears to be a core part of the organization\'s normal business practice, it would not warrant an innovation credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/16/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Please advise on the viability of the following Innovation and Design Process credit: Intent The intent of this Innovation Credit is to reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of building materials and products, and increase the market demand for climate neutral products and materials. Products and materials are climate neutral when there is zero net greenhouse gases (GHG), such as CO2, from the entire life cycle of the product. The manufacturer calculates the total GHG impact utilizing life cycle analysis and then obtains carbon emission reduction credits (ERCs) such as through green power off-set purchases or carbon sequestration projects. The offsets must equal or exceed the GHG produced during extraction, processing, manufacture, transport and end use of a product, and be certified by a recognized third party using sound scientific and accounting principles. Climate neutral products must also deliver climate benefits "above and beyond" the standard version of these building materials, thus making them distinct and separable from all other sustainability features that these materials might also possess, such as recycled content. The development of market demand for climate neutral products provides several environmental benefits: Reduce the GHG impact of building materials, and thus address the embedded climate impacts inherent in a building or interior fit-up materials. Support USGBC\'s desire to move towards a more life-cycle based approach. Reward proactive suppliers who take a climate leadership position with their products. Ensure that climate benefits can be delivered on a credible, measurable and transparent basis. Support the emerging market for carbon and other GHG trading. Requirements Specify 5% of the project\'s total material value with products or materials, which are third party certified as climate neutral. Submittals Provide a spreadsheet indicating the total material value of the project, including furniture and list each climate neutral material or product, indicating its material value in dollars, manufacturer and third-party certification. Calculate the percentage content of the climate neutral products and materials in relationship to the overall project material value. For products in which a portion of the total product is certified climate neutral, the calculation is based on the percentage of the climate neutral material in relationship to the total material or product cost. The percentage of climate neutral products must be greater than or equal to 5% of the total project value. See formula below: Total climate neutral material value ($) / Total project material value ($) = Project percentage of climate neutral materials (%) Provide cut sheets or other documentation demonstrating climate neutral compliance for each product. Potential Technologies & Strategies Research and specify products and materials that are climate neutral and have third party life cycle analysis and certification, which has determined that there is no net addition of greenhouse gases CO2, from their from their extraction, processing, manufacture and end use. Establish a project goal for climate neutral products and identify suppliers that can achieve this goal. Select products, which met all other project performance criteria including other environmental benefits, such as recycled content, distance from project site to place of manufacturer and extraction, VOC content and other measurable criteria. Supporting Documentation This innovation credit recognizes that tools are becoming available to more clearly state the environmental benefits of product and materials which offer a climate neutral stance in regard to greenhouse gas impact. For the purposes of this credit climate neutral products and materials are climate neutral when there is no net addition of greenhouse gases, such as CO2, from their extraction, processing and/or manufacture, or the manufacturer has purchased carbon or other greenhouse gas offsets such as through green power purchases. The Climate Neutral Network (www.climateneutral.com) is an independent non-profit organization which certifies climate neutrality under its Climate Cool brand mark for products, materials, processes and enterprises. The process of certification is rigorous, quantitative and based on established, clearly stated and repeatable standards and principles, similar to the rigor of the Greenguard and Forest Stewardship Council, although with a difference emphasis. Based on the particular products and/or amount of material specified, manufacturers can calculate the amount of CO2 permanently retired by the specific use of a Climate Cool product or material. The achievement threshold for this proposed innovation credit is 5% of total project material cost. Given the current limited amount of climate neutral products available on the market, this threshold is significant in that to achieve this level a designer will need to seek out and consciously choose these products and materials over their non-climate neutral counterparts. This threshold is the same as the current LEED-CI threshold for rapidly renewable materials, which currently represent a similar sized share of the building material market.

Ruling:

NOTE: This CIR and ruling can apply to projects registered in other rating systems other than LEED-CI. Your innovation credit proposal for use of climate neutral products is acceptable provided that: 1. Each third-party certifier of climate neutral products is a reputable, independent entity. An example of a climate neutral product certifier is the Climate Neutral Network. Purchases from carbon offset retail programs must be of the quality explained in Appendix A, below. Any credible environmental claim certifier can utilize the path described in Appendix B to certify climate neutral products. 2. The product\'s entire line of supply and manufacture must be climate neutral. It is not sufficient that a manufacturer purchase offsets solely for the units that are purchased and installed in a specific building; the continuous process that enables a specific product\'s availability to the market must be climate neutral. Minor variables such as color choices do not constitute a separate product. As already stated in your proposal, the full lifecycle of the products needs to be addressed and the products must also deliver climate benefits "above and beyond" the standard version of these building materials, making them distinct and separable from other sustainability features that these materials might also possess, such as recycled content. To demonstrate a product\'s climate neutral status, include in your submittals the certifier\'s verification of climate neutral product status with a summary of the carbon footprint formulation and means used to achieve climate neutral status. Include a copy of the inventory summary used by the USEPA Climate Leaders program. USGBC recognizes that this is a rapidly evolving field and so this ruling may not have long standing as a precedent for other requests. The ruling will be revised as the standards of quality and certification advance. ----------------------------- APPENDIX A There must be a 100% offset of Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions.* The following is acceptable for Scope 1 and 3 emissions*: Emission reduction ("ERs") offsets must be generated from acceptable project categories which must be independently verified by a recognized verification entity. The manufacturer must provide full disclosure on the type of emission reduction offsets applied. Allowances should be excluded as should any "business as usual" ERs where additionality is questionable. Acceptable offsets are as follows: 1. Any project that is determined to be an eligible Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) provided by article 12 of the Kyoto Protocol. 2. Any project sanctioned by a U.S. State, group of U.S. States (e.g., RGGI), or the Federal Government, where the carbon reduction is assigned or otherwise stated. 3. Any project that is verified and registered as a Gold Standard project (www.cdmgoldstandard.org). 4. Any approved Joint Implementation (JI) project as provided by article 6 of the Kyoto Protocol. 5. Any approved European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) project. 6. Any project that is verified to meet the Voluntary Carbon Standard (www.v-c-s.org). 7. Carbon offsets certified by Center for Resource Solutions (www.green-e.org) or Environmental Resources Trust (www.ert.net). 8. California Climate Registry carbon credits or offsets. 9. All types of offset projects are allowed except for HFC-23 destruction. 10. Acceptable offsets from a demonstrated equivalent (for guidance on showing equivalency, see LEED-EB EAc2 credit ruling from May 2006). The following is acceptable for Scope 2 emissions,* considered indirect electricity emissions: Any direct offsets acceptable for offsetting Scope 1 emissions as well as renewable energy certificates (RECs) certified by Center for Resource Solutions\' Green-e program, Environmental Resources Trust\'s EcoPower program, or demonstrated equivalent (for guidance on showing equivalency, see LEED-EB EAc2 credit ruling from May 2006). -------------------------------- APPENDIX B An environmental claim certifier can use robust and verifiable internationally accepted standards to classify a product as carbon neutral. Use ISO 1404x series of standards for life cycle assessment (LCA) as necessary to formulate the product\'s carbon footprint. Use guidance from USEPA Climate Leaders program, the WRI/WBCSD Greenhouse Gas Protocol, or ISO 14064** as needed for accounting and reporting of emissions and offsets. Complete a copy of the inventory summary used by the US EPA Climate Leaders program. Account for the complete lifecycle (including the product\'s anticipated lifespan). The product\'s entire line of supply and manufacture must be climate neutral. It is not sufficient that a manufacturer purchase offsets solely for the units that are purchased and installed in a specific building; the continuous process that enables a specific product\'s availability to the market must be climate neutral. Minor variables such as color choices do not constitute a separate product. Once this inventory of the product\'s carbon footprint is completed, there must be a 100% offset of Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions.* The following is acceptable for Scope 1 and 3 emissions*: Emission reduction ("ER") offsets must be generated from acceptable project categories which must be independently verified by a recognized verification entity. The manufacturer must provide full disclosure on the type of emission reduction offsets applied. Allowances should be excluded as should any "business as usual" ERs where additionality is questionable. Acceptable offsets are as follows: 1. Any project that is determined to be an eligible Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) provided by article 12 of the Kyoto protocol. 2. Any project sanctioned by a U.S. State, group of U.S. States (e.g., RGGI), or the Federal Government, where the carbon reduction is assigned or otherwise stated. 3. Any project that is verified and registered as a Gold Standard project (www.cdmgoldstandard.org). 4. Any approved Joint Implementation (JI) project as provided by article 6 of the Kyoto Protocol. 5. Any approved European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) project. 6. Any project that is verified to meet the Voluntary Carbon Standard (www.v-c-s.org). 7. Carbon offsets certified by Center for Resource Solutions (www.green-e.org) or Environmental Resources Trust (www.ert.net). 8. California Climate Registry carbon credits or offsets (www.climateregistry.org). 9. All types of offset projects are allowed except for HFC-23 destruction. 10. Acceptable offsets from a demonstrated equivalent (for guidance on showing equivalency, see LEED-EB EAc2 credit ruling from May 2006). The following is acceptable for Scope 2 emissions,* considered indirect electricity emissions: Any direct offsets acceptable for offsetting Scope 1 emissions as well as renewable energy certificates (RECs) certified by Center for Resource Solutions\' Green-e program, Environmental Resources Trust\'s EcoPower program, or demonstrated equivalent (for guidance on showing equivalency, see LEED-EB EAc2 credit ruling from May 2006). SUBMITTALS: Submit the certifier\'s verification of climate neutral product status with a summary of the carbon footprint formulation and means used to achieve climate neutral status. Include a copy of the inventory summary used by the USEPA Climate Leaders program. ------------------------------------------------ * DEFINITIONS: (Source: WRI/WBCSD GHG Protocol. See the GHG Protocol for expanded definitions.) Scope 1 emissions: Emissions from sources under direct control, i.e. at premises under your control or in your vehicle fleet, etc. Scope 2 emissions: Emissions from electricity that is generated elsewhere (i.e., independently, off-site). Scope 3 emissions: Other indirect emissions that are not from owned emission sources, e.g. from the related supply chain, business travel, transportation of purchased fuels, and use of sold products and services. ------------------------------------------------ ** REFERENCED STANDARDS

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
12/18/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We propose that a LEED Innovation & Design Process (IDP) point be awarded to any project that uses only carpet products designated as Environmentally Preferable Products (EPPs) by achieving either \'Gold\' or \'Platinum\' certification as per NSF Standard 140-2005 - Sustainable Carpet Assessment Standard (a draft Standard developed by NSF International, presently in its trial use and comment period) Specifically, we intend to use a Collins & Aikman ER3 Modular Tile product for our LEED-CI (Commercial Interiors) Project. The entire line of ER3 Modular Tile products are SCAS NSF-140 \'Platinum\' certified. The Sustainable Carpet Assessment Standard (SCSA) is the first nation-wide certification program that evaluates all measurable aspects of the environmental performance of carpet products. SCSA seeks to promote products that provide comprehensive environmental, economic, and social benefits while protecting and enhancing the needs of future generations, public health, welfare and the environment over their full commercial cycles, from raw materials extraction to final disposition, and ensuring that such products are also equivalent in performance and quality to other carpet products. Carpet products that carry SCSA \'Gold\' and \'Platinum\' level certification have the added credibility of being subject to regular, independent third-party audits. Upon completion of the trial use and comment period, SCSA will be revised as necessary and submitted to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for approval as an American National Standard. In the baseline LEED Rating Systems, carpet products are evaluated per their indoor VOC emissions, plus the extent to which they might have some recycled content, regional material content, and/or rapidly-renewable material content, thus contributing to the associated Materials & Resources credits. While valuable, such criteria are somewhat limited in scope. By contrast, SCSA takes a broad, life-cycle-based approach to product evaluation, thoroughly examining such varied issues as the environmental impact of the manufacturing processes, social concerns such as the rights and working conditions of company employees, and what happens to carpet products at the end of their useful lives. The draft Sustainable Carpet Assessment Standard consists of the following major categories: Safe for Public Health and Environment Addresses the reduction of inventory pollutants that adversely impact public health and the environment, over the entire supply chain of any given carpet product. Energy & Energy Efficiency Addresses energy use and greenhouse gas emissions associated with carpet production and recognizes the use of renewable energy sources and implementation of conservation and efficiency measures. Bio-based, Recycled Content or Environmentally-Preferable Products Addresses more environmentally-benign feedstocks used to manufacture carpet products and is applicable to either natural or synthetic fiber construction. Manufacturing Addresses company-wide environmental stewardship via reporting and certification protocol, such as adoption of an environmental policy, use of an environmental management system (EMS) and public declaration of performance as per ISO 14001. Reclamation and End-of-Life Management Addresses product reuse and reclamation opportunities as well as installation and maintenance procedures that extend product system life. We feel that this strategy warrants a LEED IDP point because SCAS sets a high benchmark for environmental accomplishment, is comprehensive in nature, and specifically references many other third-party standards to set specific performance criteria. Furthermore, there is precedence for acceptance of such holistic standards for IDP points. In recent CIR Rulings, USGBC has favorably recognized whole product evaluation standards such as MBDC C2C, the California Gold Standard and the Climate Neutral Network Climate Cool Certification. The Project Team hopes that adoption of such a rigorous standard in the carpet industry will stimulate development of similar standards to guide other industries involved in the manufacturing of building products and materials. NSF Standard 140-2005 - Sustainable Carpet Assessment Standard can be accessed on-line at: http://www.nsf.org/business/standards_and_publications/pdf/NSF_140-05-DS....

Ruling:

The suggested criterion encourages innovation through product improvement and is thus acceptable for an innovation point, given that the specific threshold listed below is met and proper documentation is provided upon LEED application. However, the point system proposed does not align with LEED Innovation Points (1/2 Innovation Points cannot be rewarded, and only 1 ID point may be awarded per each green strategy attempted.) The threshold for attaining one (1) Innovation Point is as follows: - use NSF/ANSI 140-2007 certified carpet for all carpet products installed in the project, AND - When silver level carpet is used and carpet represents at least 5% of the value of the project OR - When gold level carpet is used and carpet represents at least 2.5% of the value of the project OR - When platinum level carpet is used and carpet represents at least 1.25% of the value of the project. Please see NCv2.2 CIR Ruling dated 6/6/2007 (for IDc1.1) for additional information on the intended direction of the LEED Rating System. **The USGBC has updated the ruling to this CIR as of 1/22/10 to state that the 1 year sunset provision established in the original Credit Interpretation Ruling related to the NSF/ANSI 140-2007 carpet certification program is hereby extended to all pre LEED-2009 projects , pending the development and adoption of criteria and processes for recognition of third party certification programs in LEED. Said criteria will apply to all currently recognized and proposed future programs. Note: this ruling does not apply to Core and Shell projects. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/19/2002
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Grants for PV Panels The Design Build Team for a government office building in California was given a stipulated sum for the entire scope of the project. In an effort to incorporate green strategies to the project that would otherwise not have economically feasible with the limited budget, the Design Build Team sought out new sources for funding, outside the Project stipulated sum, including federal, state and local grants and industry incentive programs. One identified source was a local utility that would donate photovoltaic panels under the stipulation that the panels had to be incorporated into the architecture, and not just added onto the building. The design team re-designed parts of the exterior, and worked with the exterior building envelope sub-contractors and the PV panel suppliers to develop systems to incorporate the PV panels directly into the exterior curtain wall. As a result, over 300 PV panels were incorporated into the project at no cost to the Owner. The PV wall system includes both structural butt-glazed panels and captured panels, which kept intact the original design intent. Question: Would the seeking out of funding sources for green features be considered an innovation point?

Ruling:

No, securing additional funding for green building features does not constitute an innovation. Rewarding projects that buy down first cost through incentive programs is contrary to the LEED objective of demonstrating green building performance within conventional cost assumptions. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/20/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This project is a laboratory building being constructed in an existing building. As part of the design process, the Labs21 EPC and the LEED Draft Application Guide for Labs were used as a guideline for sustainable design features of the labs. Towards that end, we are proposign the following for ID Credit 1.1: ID CR 1: Laboratory Safety: Intent: Insure the health and safety of laboratory employees Requirements: Design laboratories to ensure contaminants are contained and workers are protected (relates to AGL EQ Pre-Requisite 3 and Credits 9.1 and 9.2) 1. Ensure minimum requirements for safety and worker protection are met through compliance with ANSI / AIHA Z9.5 latest version. 2. Conduct Fume Hood commissioning including ASHRAE-110 method for testing performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods (latest version). This includes field testing each of the new fume hoods as well as each of the existing fume hoods scheduled to remain in the new construction. 3. Design all alarm systems in the laboratory to be inherently self-identifying and fail-safe Submittals will be 1. Letter certifying ventilation design is in compliance with ANSI / AIHA Z9.5 latest version 2. Specifications and Fume Hood Commissioning report 3. Fume hood controls and alarm system diagrams and schematics from design documents Please advise if this suggested point will meet the requirements of the Innovation in Design Credit 1 and will be likely to be awarded to this project.

Ruling:

ASHRAE 110 commissioning of fume hoods is acceptable for an ID credit on your project. To meet the requirement, ALL fume hoods on the project must be commissioned, and commissioning must occur with permanent HVAC systems in place and operating. Your team should be aware that ASHRAE 110 commissioning requires tracer gas testing, which may require the discharge of relatively large quantities of Sulfa Hexafluoride, a climate change gas. Teams using ASHRAE 110 are encouraged to seek alternative testing methods involving other gases, or the use of higher sensitivity sensors so that lower quantities of gases can be used. *Please note a previous ruling to this CIR was posted and has since been revised by the IEQ TAG.* Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/22/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Intent: Implement a "Green Office Program" for building tenants who commit and prove they are operating as a "Green Office". The program will encourage tenants to operate more sustainably even if they are not performing a renovation (LEED-CI) for their office space. The goal is to provide method for tenants to move into the direction of sustainable operation, and with supporting documents showing achievement, be rewarded by the property management office. This will also encourage tenants to perform conduct cost-benefit analysis for improvements that can be achieved at nominal and/or no cost. Even credits that have a cost may still have that cost returned through reduced operating expenses. The "Green Office Program" is promoted through the building tenant guide and distributed by building managers, which encourages tenants to identify and implement no-cost and low-cost alternatives to operating in a standard indoor office environment. Scored on a scale of 100, offices are evaluated in seven categories: Energy Efficiency, People & Atmosphere; Travel & Commuting; Reduce, Reuse & Recycle; Cleaning; Remodeling & Construction; and LEED. When a specific strategy or improvement has been implemented, participating tenants earn "Leaf Credits." If an office achieves "70 Leaf Credits", it is then designated as a GREEN OFFICE. Here are a few items (entire program will be submitted with ID): Energy: - Set computers to "energy save" mode - Lower blinds in summer; raise blinds in winter - Install occupancy light sensors - Replace End of Life computer monitors with Energy Star Equipment - Set "sleep mode" for office equipment - Install compact fluorescent/low mercury light wherever possible People and Atmosphere: -Organize office employees to participate in a sustainability-focused community project once per year -Keep you local office employees updated quarterly about what green efforts you have achieved, your future sustainable goals, and how they can assist in reaching those goals Travel & Commuting: - Instead of traveling for meetings, reduce emissions by encourage teleconferencing and videoconferencing when possible - Ensure 25% of employees carpool or use mass transit to commute to work Reduce/Re-use/Recycle: - Use mugs and tumblers to save waste on disposable cups and plastic bottles - Participate in E-recycle Day for buildings annual e-recycle drive - Transition from petroleum-based or non-compostable products (ex: Styrofoam) to biodegradable products - Do not order any bottled water. Procure bottle-less water coolers to provide cool and hot filtered municipal water Remodeling & Construction: - Certify your office space as LEED-CI - Standardize workspace configuration to accommodate future change that will minimize remodeling and construction - Shift from "closed single offices" to efficient "open-office work plans" Requirements: Every 2 years, the tenant office manager would submit a scorecard to the property manager listing "green opportunities" achieved. Supporting documentation must be provided to achieve the credit. The tenant representative would also be required to attend quarterly building management/tenant meetings to updates to "Green Office Tenant Guidelines" and how they can promote sustainable office/business operation. As you can see, our goal is not to replace LEED-CI. Our program will not only encourage tenants seek LEED-CI, but also help grow our sustainable culture among building occupants beyond the built environment. Many tenants want to operate more sustainably. This program will be their guide.

Ruling:

The described approach would qualify for an Innovation in Operations point due to the comprehensive and extensive education and outreach to building occupants and tenants around sustainability issues. Please note that this initiative falls under the umbrella of green education, and only one education-related IO point can be awarded per project. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/27/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

ID Credit Title: DIGITAL FACILTY MANUAL Credit Intent: Implement an electronic documents tool that will provide for easy access to all record documents of the facility. This paperless tool shall assist the facility manager in maintenance productivity since the documents will available for view in seconds. This tool will be provided at project turnover and the manual will aid the facility group in long term efficiency in energy and systems operations. Requirements for Compliance: Develop and implement a digital facility manual which will be used for facility operation and maintenance in lieu of traditional three-ring binder and as-built drawings. It shall also incorporate guidance on operating metrics and testing frequency. This tool shall include all divisions of work and provide hyperlinks between the equipment submittals and drawings so the facility operators can access record documents easily and thoroughly. The digital facility manual shall include: - All as-built drawings - All approved equipment submittals - All test records and reports - Preventative maintenance tasks and schedules Submittal: Confirm that a digital facility manual is being used and has replaced the need for hard-copy operations and maintenance documentation. Confirm that all as-built drawings, equipment submittals, test records and reports, preventative maintenance tasks and schedules are accessible through the digital facility manual. Provide letter from facility manager or owner the digital facility manual is being used.

Ruling:

The project team is proposing an Innovation in Design credit based on the merits of creating a digital facility manual to be used by facility operation and maintenance staff, in lieu of the traditional three-ring binder and as-built drawings. While this is commendable, the reduction of paper for this facility manual is relatively insignificant compared to the quantity of paper over the duration of the project\'s design and construction phase. As comprehensive, significant environmental benefits have not been identified, this proposal does not meet the requirements of an innovation credit. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/27/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent of credit: ---- Reduce operations related carbon footprint and encourage organizations associated with LEED projects to do likewise. Requirements for compliance: ---- Identify operational sources of carbon emissions not otherwise addressed by LEED. Establish the operational carbon footprint of the occupants of the LEED project verified by a recognized authority. (See CIR dated 6/29/06 for list of authorities). Obtain carbon offsets for the carbon footprint associated with operational sources of carbon emissions equal to or greater than 50% over 2 years**. Submittals: ---- 1. Signed letter template declaring that offsets equivalent to at least 50% of operational carbon emission loads associated with air travel, car travel, and natural gas for a period of at least two years have been obtained. 2. Narrative describing the project\'s approach to addressing carbon loads. 3. Calculation used to determine carbon emissions, resulting equivalence data, and quantity of offset measures required. 4. Certification document from a recognized source of carbon offset credits. Design Approach (Strategies) / Narrative: ---- Reliable analysis of construction related life cycle carbon emissions is difficult to obtain and verify at this time. Emissions data related to operations are more readily available and recognized authorities exist that can quantify the carbon emissions related to operations based on established metrics. This credit addresses carbon emissions other than those addressed by LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power. The following steps describe the actions needed to achieve this credit: Research currently available carbon emission measurement standards and offset options. Identify recognized service providers. (See CIR dated 6/29/06 for list of recognized authorities) List carbon emission sources specific to operations associated with the project in question. Run calculations on offset measures needed. Obtain carbon offset credits at least equivalent to 50% of operational carbon emission loads associated with natural gas, air travel, and car travel for a period of at least two years. This innovation credit meets the three basic criteria for innovation credits as described in the LEED Reference Guide: 1. Quantitative performance improvement: A baseline evaluation of the operational carbon footprint using methods specified by a recognized authority (Green-e for instance) establishes a starting point and is used to calibrate the quantity of carbon offset measures needed. 2. Comprehensive program: The program addresses business related carbon emissions related to air travel, car travel, and natural gas, not covered by LEED and augmenting similar efforts related to electrical loads achieved by meeting LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power requirements. 3. Applicability to other projects: This innovation credit provides an outline for any organization interested in addressing their operational carbon footprint. Similar ID credits related to post occupancy efforts are listed in the USGBC\'s Innovation & Design Credit Catalog (1 December 2007), including credits addressing: Green Cleaning; Monitoring Threatened & Endangered Species; Donation and Protection of Open Space (not assoc. with project site); Alternative Transportation Management Plan; Employee Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions; Food composting; Occupant recycling program; Waste reduction operations; Work at home program; LEED post-occupancy performance evaluation; Employee wellness; Educational program; Student report; Carbon offset; Environmentally preferable services; and Off site environmental benefit. ** Time period and % based on those established for the LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power credit.

Ruling:

The applicant submitted a CIR proposing an innovation and design credit in which projects would offset the emissions associated with tenant space operations. While this proposal does demonstrate environmental benefits, it cannot be approved at this time due to the complexities surrounding carbon accounting. USGBC is performing research in this area and will update this CIR ruling as necessary. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/23/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following proposed innovation in design credit language is intended to demonstrate accomplishment of Comprehensive Exterior VOC Emitting Materials Reduction above and beyond requirements set forth in existing LEED credits. We recognize that an ID credit cannot be granted achievement through the CIR process, but request the review of this proposed approach for viability and appropriateness as written to support a project earning an ID credit by meeting these requirements. Proposed Title: Comprehensive Exterior VOC Emitting Materials Reduction Intent: Provide a safe and healthy outdoor environment for both construction teams and building occupants. Reduce outdoor pollution resulting from construction practices and material selection. Requirements: Significantly reduce the amount of VOCs released to the outdoor air through construction practices and materials selection by specifying low VOC emitting products for each of the following if/as incorporated in the project: ? Factory applied cool roof coating (rather than field applied) ? No added urea-formaldehyde composite wood exterior doors ? Low VOC siding materials (composite wood and cement product) ? Low VOC pesticides and vegetation care products ? Heat island effect: roof- meet LEED-NC SS7.2 credit requirements Submittal: In addition to all corresponding submittal requirements for existing LEED credits, document specific efforts to reduce VOCs external to the building, and describe how a comprehensive exterior VOC reduction that address control and mitigation has been realized. Design Approach: ? Source Control: minimize VOC sources from being installed/used in the exterior building and site construction ? Mitigation: maintain outdoor air quality to minimize VOC presence ? Identify sources of VOCs within the exterior building and site design, and specify low VOC or VOC free alternatives. ? Locate site in area accessible to existing public transportation networks, provide bike storage and showering facilities, provide preferred parking for low emitting and fuel efficient vehicles, and base parking capacity on actual user needs rather than code or precedent for building type. ? Green Seal Standard GC-03 exterior paints, primers, and coatings ? SCAQMD Rule #1168 compliant concrete sealant ? Low VOC exterior caulks and adhesives ? Separate pedestrian traffic flow patterns from vehicle flow patterns ? Heat island effect: non-roof- meet LEED-NC SSc7.1 credit requirements ? SCAQMD Rule #1168 compliant wood stains and wood sealers ? Low VOC decking materials (composite wood and cement product)

Ruling:

The proposed requirements and approach to an ID credit have merit. In order to justify an ID credit, the requirements would need to be more comprehensive than stated, and you would need to provide additional environmental context. To be comprehensive, the requirements should include the VOC limits for concrete sealants and caulks, exterior paints, wood stains and sealers, and metal stains and sealers. Also, the project should describe the regional air quality context to justify the restriction of outdoor emissions of VOCs. For example, the importance of man-made VOC emissions in smog formation varies between regions. If you decide to pursue an ID credit for this approach, be sure to include the full component of chemical products in the requirements and to quantify both the health and environmental benefits. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/10/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Office Furniture and Equipment Recycling Program Seattle Public Utilities, the owner of the Operations Control Center project, operates a number of facilities in Seattle. Instead of procuring furniture and equipment separately for the OCC project and other facilities, SPU has contracts with a limited number of suppliers so that individual items can be recycled and shared between facilities. Is it likely that this program would be approved as an Innovation in Design credit?

Ruling:

The applicant is presenting a potential innovation credit for an Office Furniture and Equipment Recycling Program. Furniture reuse can be applied toward MR Credit 3.3 Resource Reuse, 30% Furniture and Furnishings. An innovation credit for this will be awarded if the next incremental threshold is met, i.e. the credit calculations must demonstrate achievement of a minimum of 60% (based on cost). Please refer to the LEED-CI v2.0 Reference Guide, page 227 for more information on this. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are seeking an Innovation in Design credit for implementation of innovative, environmentally beneficial measures through active intervention in the zoning and land development process of the larger community. In the end, a 16,000 s.f. project was able to leverage over 200,000 s.f. of LEED Gold. Background While St. Stephen\'s was in the design process for its LEED project, a local developer proposed to build on the vacant lot located one property lot away to the south. The project team learned that the developer was preparing to present the building design drawings at an upcoming Harrisburg Planning Commission meeting, during which variances would be requested for significantly exceeding the height and setbacks allowed by city zoning code. St. Stephen\'s publicly opposed providing a variance for these excesses primarily because the neighboring building would cut off access to sunlight that the St. Stephen\'s project team was planning to collect for day lighting and PV arrays. Given the developer\'s and St. Stephen\'s prestige in the community, St Stephen\'s requested a meeting with the developer to discuss the issues to see if the height could be lowered or setbacks aligned with zoning requirements. The outcome was that the developer agreed to meet with the St. Stephen\'s team. Initially the developer brought in his architect to explain the designs. The St. Stephen\'s team also presented its sunshade studies. The developer agreed to examine stepping the new building back between the 5th and 8th stories so that the St. Stephen\'s complex would not be in shadow so often. Ultimately, no accommodations for setbacks were provided and it was acknowledged that the developer had no intention of making it a sustainable or LEED building. Soon thereafter, the developer divulged that the tenant would be Pennsylvania Housing and Finance Authority (PHFA). Resulting LEED Achievement During the time period that followed, St. Stephen\'s thought that there was an opportunity in this to leverage their position and negotiate a greater good by supporting the proposed zoning variances. At the time in 2002, very few PA state agencies were pursuing LEED certification for their buildings, with the exception of DEP. The project team thought that fighting the developer and PHFA might ultimately gain the 16,000 s.f. St. Stephen\'s school daylight, but rather than be "penny wise and pound foolish" the project team realized that there would be a much greater benefit if they could convince a public agency to make greater accommodations that would benefit the larger Harrisburg and Pennsylvania community in the name of environmental responsibility. They believed this could be especially important given that the agency is the PHFA that would deal with the future housing in the state. As a result, the St Stephen\'s project team invited the PHFA representatives to join in the discussions with the developer. During the subsequent meetings, the St. Stephen LEED design team educated the building\'s developer and its tenant, the PHFA, about sustainable design buildings and negotiated a formal agreement. This agreement accomplished 1) a minimum silver rated building for a state agency, 2) a smaller building that was "stepped back" so that it would relate better to the surrounding small and historic buildings within the neighborhood and not leave them all in shadow, 3) higher density in the neighborhood by allowing a smaller setback and taller building than zoning permitted, and 4) greater access to solar energy for the Episcopal school by granting St. Stephen\'s rights to harvest solar energy from the PHFA roof, which is much larger than St. Stephen\'s and would see more daylight than St Stephen\'s would otherwise due to surrounding buildings and trees. As a result of the St. Stephen\'s project team efforts, the developer and PHFA were prompted to enlisted their architect to redesign their project to include sustainable design features and achieve the minimum LEED silver rating that St. Stephen\'s demanded as part of the negotiated agreement, which is why sustainable design became one of the inherent development goals of the PHFA building. The PHFA building ultimately received LEED Gold Certification in September 2005.

Ruling:

The USGBC does not consider this proposal alone to merit an innovation credit. However, a comprehensive public education program on LEED rating system and the benefits of green building is a laudable strategy worthy of an innovation credit. A green education program must meet the requirements of CIR ruling dated 9/24/2001. The proposed narrative outlining the educational outreach program undertaken by the project, can contribute as one of the educational elements. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/6/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

INQUIRY: To help stimulate the development of sustainable product evaluation and certification tools by building professionals, we are seeking to establish an innovation point for specification of products certified under the SMART & California Gold Sustainable Product Programs explained at: http://mts.sustainableproducts.com/SMART_Building_Product_Standard SMART & California Gold provide manufacturers with a transparent measure of sustainable product achievement through consensus based standards. They help customers purchase and specify products that are pursuing a broad definition of quality. Through SMART and California Gold, this broader definition of quality means using products and materials safe for public health and environment as measured by LCA and 12 life cycle impacts; using renewable energy and energy efficiency; using recycled and biobased organic materials with EPA best management practices; increased water conservation; facility and company achievements; social equity; and product reuse and reclamation. SMART & California Gold meet all 24 Sustainable Product Certification Criteria (SPC Criteria) found here: http://sustainableproducts.typepad.com/Sustainable_Product_Certification.... To qualify for this CIR, SMART Gold & California Gold must have at the manufacturing facility 60% Green-e Power or 60% conventional energy reduction from the baseline. SMART & California Platinum must have 80% Green-e or 80% conventional energy reduction for both the manufacturing facility and suppliers. Eighty percent of all SMART & California Gold credits reduce climate change pollution. If a candidate product achieves the necessary criteria, it is certified as a Silver, Gold or Platinum Sustainable Product and must complete independent third party global auditing requirements of manufacturer and supplier facilities. The following Intent, Requirements and Submittals for this Innovation in Design application are suggested: Intent: Help stimulate the development of certified sustainable products for use by building professionals. Requirements: Use SMART or California Gold Certified building materials and products for 2.5% of the total value of all building materials and products used in the project, based on cost. The "cost value" of products for the purposes of this calculation will be discounted by 50% for Silver level products, and doubled for products certified at the platinum level: Cost value of products = (Silver x 0.5) + Gold (1.0) + (Platinum x 2) Submittals: Spreadsheet matrix with the following information: DEFAULT MATERIALS VALUE Total construction costs (hard costs for CSI Master Format 1995 Divisions 2-10 and 12** only): _______ Default materials cost (total Divisions 2-10 and 12** construction cost x 0.45): _______ OR ACTUAL MATERIALS VALUE Actual materials cost (excluding labor and equipment) hard costs for CSI Master Format 1995 Divisions 2-10 only): _______ - Material Name/Description - Manufacturer - Total Material Cost ($) - Percent Of Product SMART or California Gold Certified (% by Weight) - Compliant Product Value - Adjusted value (Silver x 0.5, Gold x 1.0, Platinum x2) Total "cost value" ($) of SMART or California Gold certified materials: _______ SMART or California Gold certified material value as a percentage of total materials cost*: _______ *To qualify for this ID credit the percentage of SMART or California Gold certified materials must be at least 2.5% of the total materials cost. **CSI Master Format 1995 Division 12 may be included in calculations if materials from Division 12 are used consistently with calculations in credits MRc3-7 in LEED-NC or MRc3-6 in LEED-CS. LEED-CI projects are required to include Division 12 components in the calculation of this ID point, as these components are required for calculations in CI credits MRc4-7. Please refer to the LEED-CI Reference Guide\'s credit calculation instructions for guidance in calculating these credits.

Ruling:

Yes, the suggested criterion encourages innovation through product improvement and is thus acceptable for an innovation point, given proper documentation upon LEED application. Note that the MR TAG and others intend to work towards establishing a set of criteria for product evaluation and certification tools that are referenced in LEED, whether in innovation points or in rating system credit language; and once those criteria have been established, it will be necessary to revisit whether or not proposed innovation points based on this draft language should continue to be approved. Regardless of the state of above-mentioned process, this CIR proposal\'s approval sunsets one year from the ruling posting date, at which time it is to be considered for renewal. **** The USGBC has updated the ruling to this CIR as of 9/28/09 to state that the 1 year sunset provision established in the original Credit Interpretation Ruling related to the SMART and California Gold sustainable product certification programs is hereby extended to all pre LEED-2009 projects, pending the development and adoption of criteria and processes for recognition of third party certification programs in LEED. Said criteria will apply to all currently recognized and proposed future programs. **** Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/22/2005
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

PULSED POWER TECHNOLOGY [Alternative Process Water Treatment] Intent: Reduce the impact of potentially hazardous chemical discharges to the environment by eliminating conventional means of process water treatment in HVAC equipment. Reduce amount of water consumption from conventional recirculating water systems such as cooling towers, hydronic HVAC systems, or process water systems by decreasing the need for make-up water caused by evaporation and system blowdown (or bleed). Requirements: Provide an integral chemical-free water treatment technology in place of conventional water treatment which uses potentially toxic chemicals which may also produce potentially hazardous chemical byproducts. Provide documentation in the form of a letter from the project engineer that includes a narrative description of the chemical-free water treatment system used and how the system works. The narrative shall specifically state the environmental benefits of using the chemical-free process in place of the conventional chemical water treatment system; state specific chemicals and their estimated quantities eliminated by substituting the chemical-free process; state the methods and quantities of process water discharge as an estimate of potential water savings. Rationale: Recirculating water systems used in building mechanical processes such as HVAC heat rejection in cooling towers and hydronic heating and cooling systems often use chemical infiltration using manual or automatic injection processes in order to chemically treat the water contained in them. Chemical treatment is typically used for a wide range of functions such as the prevention of mineral scale formation, control of microbiological populations, and to inhibit corrosion. These functions may be equally served by the introduction of an electronic process known as pulsed power technology. Environmental benefits of the pulsed power technology are achieved simply with the elimination of potentially hazardous chemicals and their toxic byproducts used to prevent formation of mineral scale, control of microbiological populations, and inhibit corrosion. Conventional chemical treatment systems often ultimately cause the release of potentially hazardous substances into the environment through water discharge such as evaporation, spills, spray, and drift. In conventional process water systems such as open cooling towers chlorine or other biocides are used to control biological activity which is rapidly discharged to the atmosphere as chlorine gas. Corrosion inhibitors such as zinc, molybdenates, and phosphates are discharged in the drift from the cooling tower and spray settling to the ground as well as through the sewer system through blowdown draining. Water softeners, not needed in pulsed power processes, are typically used to prevent scaling and discharge quantities of salt brine as part of the softener process. The use of an alternative means of process water treatment in HVAC equipment such as the pulsed power technology is estimated to yield the following benefits and savings when applied to our building project: - the elimination of potentially hazardous chemicals and their toxic byproducts with the elimination of conventional chemical water treatment processes - saves the use of approximately 186 gallons per year of industrial strength chlorine bleach, 5 to 6 gallons of isothiazine, and 115,000 gallons of water containing 2 ppm zinc and 20 ppm phosphate from being discharged into the environment - saves the requirement for approximately 90 lbs. of chlorine per year (most of which is evaporated to the atmosphere) - Annual water usage savings of approximately 67,275 gal/yr when compared to a typical open system water cooling process (cooling tower) of the same capacity with conventional chemical treatment processes Please confirm attainability of this credit.

Ruling:

The environmental benefits presented are worthy of an innovation credit. However, the type of technology you are referencing may be one that has been controversial in regards to actual results. Your LEED documentation must provide the information above, plus proof that the technology truly works: a copy of a third-party analysis and/or letters from at least two of the vendor\'s previous clients (building engineers or facility managers) that confirm the equipment is operating successfully. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/5/2004
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ozone System in Lap Pool and Spa: exceptional IEQ Our project is a sports facility with a 6-lane, 25m swimming pool and 2 spas. Instead of the conventional chlorine system, we are using an ozone system to treat the water. The Ozone system has the following advantage: - Destroys bacteria, mold and mildew - Eliminates spores, yeasts, fungus and inactivates viruses - Aids the removal of minerals such as iron and manganese - Water is softer and has neutral pH - Leaves no unpleasant chemical or smell, no chloramines build-up, the by-products of ozone are heat and pure oxygen - No irritation to the eyes, nasal passages or throat - Will not cause dry skin, bleached hair or faded swimwear - Reduce chlorine consumption to a minimum, saving money on maintenance, and avoid storing such toxic chemical on site. To summarize, the system reduces the use of chlorine greatly (50-75% depending on splash limit). Unlike chlorine, ozone leaves no unpleasant odors or residual chemicals in the pool and spas. It eliminates the problems of red and irritated eyes, dry skin, faded swim wear and other problems associated with chlorine. We believe that this system has significantly increased the indoor environment quality of the project, especially when the pool and spas are frequently used being in a sports facility instead of a private residence. And a large amount of occupants will be benefited. Therefore, we would like to use this for one of our Innovation and Design Credits. Please advice on the feasibility.

Ruling:

The proposed strategy, if incorporated properly, may warrant an innovation credit. The use of an ozonation system that is properly sized and integrated into the swimming pool treatment system will allow ozone to act as the primary oxidizer and disinfectant. Since there is no uniform standard which has been established for ozonation of pools, ozone design criteria for disinfection in the United States is based primarily around US EPA Drinking Water Guidelines. Dose rate values between .4 mg-O3/l are normally cited and .8 mg-O3/l is commonly used. While LEED encourage approaches that reduce the use of toxic chemicals, additional information is required to provide a complete assessment of credit achievement in this case. Please describe limited reduction of chlorine (e.g., state if regulations require a minimum level of chlorine), and provide detailed explanation and proof of substantial environmental benefits (quantified as much as possible). See IDc1.1 CIR review dated 5/21/2003 for further guidance on this issue including appropriate documentation. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/24/2001
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Title: Green Building EducationINTENT: To provide public education focusing on green building strategies and solutions.REQUIREMENTS AND SUBMITTALS: Credit 1.1 (1 point) Provide permanent educational displays illustrating at least one component of each of the five major green building categories in the LEED rating system:Sustainable SitesWater EfficiencyEnergy and AtmosphereIndoor Environmental QualityMaterials and Resources- Provide narrative to describe the intended green building education program that will use the displays.- Provide narrative to describe the selected green building educational displays.- Provide design drawings of the educational displays and their locations in the building.Credit 1.2 (1 point) Provide educational outreach focusing on sustainable living and building practices to serve the general public.- Provide education program with identifiable tasks and outcomes geared toward sustainable living and building practices.- Develop an ongoing education program to provide access to practical methods for homeowners and others for sustainable living and building practices.SUMMARY OF REFERENCED STANDARDS: There are no such referenced standards for this credit.GREEN BUILDING CONCERNS: Public education is necessary to encourage green building practices in public programs, private development, and residential communities. The purpose of this innovative credit is to encourage public education in green building projects and provide a strategy to meet that goal.Mission Statement: To inspire people to live more sustainably, using flexible and achievable standards for building and landscaping practices in such a way as it will protect our local and regional natural resources.DESIGN APPROACH: Even though this credit is designed with an environmental education center in mind, the principles of public education can be applied to either public or private structures. For example, office buildings, although a private enterprise, have employees coming and going each day. A building that is didactic and is reinforced with clearly defined educational displays can have a significant impact on the user\'s understanding of the built and natural environment. Transforming thoughtful design solutions into educational opportunities is the intent of this credit. Also, disseminating effective and practical information on sustainable living and building practices to the general public is a fundamental way to make changes in our society.

Ruling:

To take advantage of the educational value of the green building features of a project and to earn a LEED point, any approach should be ACTIVELY instructional. Two of the following three elements must be included in the educational program:1) A comprehensive signage program built into the building\'s spaces to educate the occupants and visitors of the benefits of green buildings. This program may include windows to view energy-saving mechanical equipment or signs to call attention to water-conserving landscape features.2) The development of a manual, guideline or case study to inform the design of other buildings based on the successes of this project. This manual will be made available to the USGBC for sharing with other projects.3) An educational outreach program or guided tour could be developed to focus on sustainable living, using the project as an example. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/10/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following proposed innovation in design credit is intended to demonstrate that Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST) designed for distribution of natural gas and LPG (propane Gas) systems saves time, reduces cost, and is environmentally friendly where integrated in a holistic approach to a building project. This innovative technology is the only standard based natural gas and LPG (propane gas) system manufactured, designed sized and installed under the ANSI LC1 certification process. CSST is IAPMO, ICC and CSA listed; IFGC, UPC and NFPA-54 approved as a gas-piping material. This system is installed with fewer fittings eliminating leak paths in the natural gas or LPG (propane gas) system, thus making the system safer within a structure. The inherent flexibility and light weight will reduce costs and help prevent job related accidents. Most manufactures\' of CSST incorporate a fitting which uses a metal to metal seal with no gaskets or O-rings and features which allows for maintaining of the integrity of the Polyethylene jacket protecting the system from corrosion and harsh environments. The Polyethylene jacket, as required by ANSI LC1, is constructed to meet the ASTM E84 requirement for Fire /Smoke (25/50) making the system safer in the event of fire. This innovative technology eliminates the need for welding of natural gas and LPG piping and the dangers associated with such procedures, such as toxic fumes from welding gases, flux and brazing rods and smoke and soot caused by welding. This technology reduces respiratory problems associated with inhaling the toxic fumes resulting from welding of natural gas and LPG piping and eliminates the dangers of fire associated with welding of natural gas and LPG piping. It also eliminates personal injury associated with the use of welding and threading equipment. It is our intent to submit for this credit as a system which exceeds the LEED-NC performance as related to a safer environment during construction and safer system within a structure, for the life of the structure.

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification as to whether the use of Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing for distribution of natural gas and LPG warrants the award of an Innovation in Design credit. While the benefit of reduced exposure for construction workers and building occupants are laudable, this concern is addressed in EQ Credit 3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan - During Construction. As stated on page 325 of the NCv2.2 Reference Guide, "This credit is not eligible for exemplary performance under the Innovation in Design Section". Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/24/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Innovation & Design Process: Exemplary Performance in Alternative Transportation - Hybrid Vehicle Reimbursement Program Intent Reduce pollution and energy impacts from automobile use. Requirements To receive an innovation point, the project team will demonstrate that a comprehensive hybrid vehicle reimbursement program is in place with clear performance goals, including: 1. A statement of purpose describing what the program is trying to achieve from a health and environmental standpoint, focusing on reduced carbon emissions. 2. Procedural requirements for employees who participate in the program to comply with the guidelines. 3. A clear set of acceptable performance metrics by which to measure progress or achievement, such as a sample request for reimbursement form stating all data gathered (i.e. miles driven, vehicle purchased, vehicle replaced, vehicle fuel consumption, etc.), and calculated statistics, including equivalent pounds of carbon dioxide NOT released, compared to the baseline (vehicles driven, fuel consumed, and emissions released, prior to the program). 4. Documentation of the program\'s vehicle and procurement specifications, including a list of approved vehicles, and employee eligibility guidelines. Demonstrate that the vehicles purchased and miles driven result in improved environmental impact. Submittals 1. Copy of program guidelines and eligibility requirements. 2. Copy of request for reimbursement form. 3. Calculations illustrating number of participating employees, vehicles purchased, vehicles replaced, miles driven each week for commuting purposes, and whether the program influenced the decision to purchase a hybrid. 4. Calculations quantifying equivalent pounds of carbon dioxide NOT released. Design Approach As part of a corporate commitment to reduce its environmental impact, as well as a comprehensive effort to improve its leadership on environmental issues, including LEED-CI certification of its Corporate Center interiors, Bank of America announced on June 7, 2006 that it will reimburse Associates living within 90 miles of Charlotte, Boston, and Los Angeles and purchasing a new hybrid vehicle $3,000. Available to more than 49,000 associates, the program addresses a correlation between air quality, limited travel options (other than single-rider vehicles), and commute length. As of September 7, 2006, 200 Bank of America associates, including 118 in Charlotte, have taken advantage of the program and the Bank expects up to 100 more will participate by the end of 2006. The program is available to all associates working in the Bank of America Corporate Center and it is possible to monitor how many of those associates take advantage of the program. We request a ruling on whether implementation of this program would achieve an Innovation & Design credit, since it is available to ALL Bank of America Associates living within 90 miles of Charlotte, where the Bank of America Corporate Center Renovation Pilot Project is located.

Ruling:

The applicant is proposing an innovation and design credit for Exemplary Performance of SSc4.3, Alternative Transportation based on an incentive program for those employees purchasing new hybrid vehicles. The USGBC would like to clarify that under LEED-CI there is no credit titled SSc4.3. In LEED-CI, Alternative Transportation credits fall under SSc3.1, SSc3.2 and SSc3.3 with no direct correlating credit to LEED-NC SSc4.3, Alternative Transportation: Low-Emission & Fuel Efficient Vehicles. The LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide states that projects may be awarded one innovation point for Exemplary Performance in alternative transportation, SSc4, by instituting a comprehensive transportation management plan that demonstrates a quantifiable reduction in personal automobile use through the implementation of multiple alternative options. Following this criteria under LEED-CI, an innovation point could be awarded for the incentive program, as long as it is part of a comprehensive transportation management plan that takes into account other modes of alternative transportation. The incentive program would also need to be redefined to align with the LEED-NC v2.2 definition of low-emission and fuel-efficient vehicles which are either classified as Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEV) by the California Air Resources Board or have achieved a minimum green score of 40 on the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide. Based on LEED-NC v2.1 CIR ruling dated 5/9/2003, components of a transportation management plan that might be useful toward achieving an innovation credit include: active use of a regional carpool database; a "guaranteed ride home" program for carpoolers; transit trip planning assistance; and subsidizing regional transit passes, Amtrak commuter train tickets, and bicycle purchases for bicycle commuters. Please note that the achievement of credits SSc3.1, SSc3.2 and SSc3.3 will increase the likelihood of achievement of an innovation credit for exemplary performance of Alternative Transportation. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/20/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

For our multifamily project, we propose the following approach to earn an ID point for transportation management. Please confirm whether this strategy is likely to earn an ID point if appropriately implemented and documented, and if not, what additional activities would be necessary to earn the credit. We propose to implement a two-part program to encourage bicycle use and reduce automobile use. Due to our suburban community\'s lack of a comprehensive, convenient public transportation system, we believe biking will be residents\' preferred alternative transportation mode. (Please note that this means we may not meet SSc4.1 requirements for public transportation access, but will meet 4.2, 4.3, and 4.4). (1) Implement a bicycle check-out program by which the apartment community loans bikes to residents to use for free. We expect the bikes would be used for errands and other periodic trips (when public transportation may not be practical), reducing automobile use for these trips. The bikes would also be used for recreation/exercise, contributing to a healthier community. For a 500-person community, we would purchase 5 bikes. (2) Subsidize residents\' purchase of bicycles for daily commuting. The check-out program would not be able to serve regular bike commuters. For these residents, the property will subsidize 10% of the purchase cost (up to $100) of a bicycle. Per LEED CIR ruling IDc1.1-5/9/2003, the program will continue for at least 5 years or 50 bicycles, whichever comes first.

Ruling:

Innovation credits are awarded during the certification process, not through the CIR process. This ruling is to provide guidance about the likely measures and documentation that would need to be included in the credit application. The intent of the comprehensive transportation management innovation credit is to implement multiple measures towards achieving a reduction in single passenger vehicle usage and the associated emissions. The proposed bicycle sharing and subsidies will contribute towards a comprehensive transportation management plan, but are not sufficient to qualify on their own. To develop a comprehensive transportation management plan the project team should incorporate measures to increase the use of carpooling and low-emitting vehicles similar to those listed in CIR ruling IDc1.1-5/9/2003. Furthermore, the bicycle subsidy program should offer a discount of at least 20% per CIR ruling SSc4.3-7/5/2007. Although, this CIR refers to parking discounts the same incentive would be necessary to be meaningful in all potential markets. The project team may also want to consider pursuing an innovation credit for exemplary performance under SSc4.2. This credit may be achieved in a residential development by providing covered storage facilities for at least 30% of the building residents, and by demonstrating adequate demand for the additional bicycle storage capacity and the existence of nearby destinations accessible by bicycle and/or the existence of bicycle infrastructure such as bike lanes or bike paths.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
3/11/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

BACKGROUND Under LEED EB EQ Credit 3.9, a point can be earned for achieving Green Cleaning: Integrated Indoor Pest Management. As LEED EB has identified the requirements for Integrated Indoor Pest Management, it does provide a point of reference and reduces the amount of invention/discovery required to create a green pest management program, particularly in light of the absence of a comparable foundation on this subject within the existing NC Reference Guide and CIRs. INTENT Award a point for achievement of an Integrated Indoor Pest Management program by adoption and execution of the intent, requirements, and submittals of EB EQ 3.9 for the purposes of achieving an Innovation and Design Credit under NC 2.2.

Ruling:

A project may earn an innovation credit based on an applicable credit in another LEED rating system, provided the specific requirements of that credit are met, and the appropriate documentation is provided during the submission process. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/27/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This innovation credit is being sought by addressing a significant environmental benefit that the Lutron Quantum system provides. The Lutron Quantum system is a complete-project light and energy management system that will be installed in the confidential client\'s space. The Quantum system provides the following:

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting a potential ID credit for the use of an advanced building lighting and energy management system. Many of the benefits that this system provides are accounted for in other LEED credits, such as energy conservation, daylighting, and measurement and verification. However, based on the description of the lobby/entryway real-time energy consumption display, it seems like this strategy may be considered as part of a comprehensive educational ID credit. Refer to the LEED-NC v2.1 IDc1.1 CIR Ruling dated 9/24/2001 for more information on the requirements for a Green Building Education ID credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/29/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Integrated HVAC for Building & Greenhouse This CIR proposes an innovation design credit for a design to integrate the HVAC system between the greenhouse and the main building of the new Pacific Garden Mission (PGM) facility in Chicago. The intent of the proposed design innovation is to: 1) use the greenhouse vegetation to help improve the air quality in parts of the main building; 2) pass the building exhaust air through the greenhouse to provide carbon dioxide enriched air to help in plant growth in the greenhouse. The new PGM facility includes a men\'s and a women\'s greenhouse attached to the south wall of the facility. The design calls for an HVAC system that can operate in the following three modes modes: 1)Exhaust building air from the adjacent 1st floor rooms through the greenhouse to help heat and cool the greenhouse, keep it positively pressurized to avoid infiltration. Our preliminary energy modeling indicates that this mode of operation will result in annual avoided heating costs of at least $2,500 or over 1% of the projected energy costs for the current building design. Exhausting building air through the greenhouses will promote plant growth by supplying greenhouse with CO2-enriched building exhaust air. 2)Draw air through the greenhouse so that it can be tempered and supply part of the make-up air required for the dining/kitchen area. 3)Divert the air from the adjacent rooms through the greenhouse to clean, humidify it, and enrich it with oxygen before it returns back to the building. Our approach is to include the energy saving aspects of these design features in the energy model of the building that has been prepared for EA Credit 1 Optimized Energy Performance. Therefore, our proposed Innovation Design Credit is for the environmental benefits of this design that integrates the HVAC systems of the greenhouse and main building. We look forward to the USGBC\'s guidance on this exciting potential innovation in design.

Ruling:

It is not clear that circulating air through the greenhouse will improve IEQ. It is equally as likely that the greenhouse could introduce allergens. Some of the supposed benefits (humidity control) are already addressed by existing credits. To better understand the air quality benefits of exhausting building air into the greenhouse, and more importantly, drawing recirculated air through the greenhouse for use in the occupied building, the team would have to provide additional evidence to earn an Innovation in Design Credit. Modes 1 and 2 above will provide energy savings and should be included in EAc1. Mode 3 would require evidence, such as monitoring, demonstrating that the air returning to the building is cleaner and enriched. As to humidification of the air, humidity sensors, awarded under EQc7.2, would be required to substantiate the claim and ensure that the air does not have too high of a moisture content. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2003
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Transportation Management Plan The INTENT of this innovation credit is to provide occupants of the building additional options for Alternate Transportation through the use of a Transportation Management Plan. The proposed REQUIREMENTS are to include the following features in the Transportation Management Plan: Rideshare Matching Assistance, Subsidized Regional Transit Pass ( In lieu of providing 3% with Alternative Fuel Vehicles ), Bike Subsidy and User Groups, Amtrak Subsidy, Guaranteed Ride Home Program. The required SUBMITTALS would require all features listed in the Requirements to be summarized in a narrative and in the form of the LEED letter templates. Possible DESIGN APPROACHES would include working with the local Transportation Management Association or local agency to figure out which options are best suited for the occupants of the building. The following paragraphs further explain of how the requirements will be met. Per the Transportation Management Plan filed with the City of Sacramento, and DPR\'\'s subsequent commitment to participate in and financially support the South Natomas Transportation Management Association (TMA), the following programs and services will be available to all DPR South Natomas employees as well as employees of any subtenant occupying 2480 Natomas Park Drive. Rideshare Matching Assistance The South Natomas TMA supports and uses the regional carpool database, www.1800COMMUTE.org to provide matches for short-term emergencies or long term carpool arrangements. Additionally, we will provide personalized transit trip planning assistance, providing employees a detailed explanation of how to take the bus from home to work, and back again. Prior to DPR relocating to the new South Natomas facility, all occupants will provide their names and nearest cross streets, so that carpool database will generate a personalized transit trip and/or carpool matchlist for each occupant of the building. Subsidized Regional Transit Passes We have a cooperative agreement with Regional Transit to provide photo identification Regional Transit passes to ALL member employees. This is similar to the requirement in SS4.3 to provide alternate fuel vehicles for 3% of the building. By subsidizing the Transit Pass for ALL occupants we feel that we are meeting the intent of the Alternate Transportation credits. This RT pass is valid on Regional Transit light rail and buses for both commute and non-commute trips. YoloBus, Placer County Transit and also accept this pass. Bike Subsidy and Users Group The Bike Users Group is a result of the Bucks for Bikes Program, which provides South Natomas TMA members commute bike purchase subsidies. The South Natomas BUG also provides a voice for cyclists throughout the South Natomas area, advocating safer trails and road conditions, and supporting education for current bicycle commuters and encouragement for fellow cyclists new to commuting by bike. DPR\'\'s bike lockers will complement the employees\'\' participation in our bike-related activities and support bicycle commuting. Amtrak Capitol Corridor Subsidy We offer up to 10 monthly subsidies of $28 each, or the full fare, whichever is lower, to member employees for reimbursement of an Amtrak Capitol Corridor monthly pass or multi-ride ticket. Employees have the option of either transferring to RT # 88/87 (with their Regional Transit pass) to connect to/from the Amtrak station and South Natomas or riding a bike through Discovery Park. (Amtrak has generous facilities for riders to bring bikes on board). Guaranteed Ride Home Program This program provides employees who rideshare two or more days per week and experience a mid-day emergency, or who have to work unexpected overtime, with a free guaranteed ride home using a taxi or rental car service up to 6 times per year.

Ruling:

**Update 7/1/2015: removed reference to LEED Interpretation 1547
Innovation credits are awarded during the certification process, not through the CIR process. This ruling is provided as guidance about the likely outcome if accomplishments are proven by the certification submittals. The applicant is inquiring about the potential for achieving an innovation point for exemplary performance in alternate transportation by instituting a comprehensive Transportation Management Plan (TMP). The project is likely to be awarded the innovation point as long as: (1) SS Credits 4.1, 4.2, and 4.4 are achieved; (2) the commitment requirements listed below are met; and (3) all commitments are adequately and officially documented. Components of the TMP that were found useful toward achieving this innovation credit include: active use of the regional carpool database; a "guaranteed ride home" program for carpoolers; transit trip planning assistance; and subsidizing regional transit passes, Amtrak commuter train tickets, and bicycle purchases for bicycle commuters. Specific details and additional requirements are as follows: Use of the regional carpool database contributes toward exemplary performance, if personalized carpool match lists are provided for all current occupants, as well as for new occupants, and the "guaranteed ride home" program is implemented. Official documentation (e.g., a signed letter, or an excerpt from company policy or employee manuals) must show at least a 5-year commitment to these programs. Please note that the practice of subsidizing regional transit passes and Amtrak tickets for occupants IS NOT equivalent in SS Credit 4.3\'s requirement to provide alternate fuel vehicles (contrary to your assertion), even though it displaces vehicle use. However, the transit subsidization program can count toward exemplary performance in relation to SS Credit 4.1, Public Transportation access, if a 5-year (or longer) agreement has been signed and a copy of the agreement is submitted with the LEED application. Transit trip planning also counts toward exemplary performance. State the number of employees that are initially provided personalized trip information and document the policies/procedures that ensure the same service for new employees. Bicycle locker installation is standard practice for SS Credit 4.2. Bike purchase subsidies for bike commuters contribute toward exemplary performance, if a commitment for at least 5 years or 50 bicycles (whichever comes first) is shown via LEED application submittals.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
9/6/2005
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We request a Credit Interpretation for an Innovation and Design credit for Exemplary Recycling Performance. In a CIR Ruling dated 3/8/04, you state that a recycling ID credit can be achieved if there is a ".substantial and measurable environmental benefit." You mention that previous projects have achieved an innovation credit by calculating the amount of material recycling achieved by MRp1 and then calculating the percent improvement over that recycling rate they achieved by recycling/reusing additional materials.Our question relates to applying this credit to a university campus where many of the facilities are shared. Our project is a renovation of a residence hall. In addition to recycling the basic recyclables required in MRp1, we offer collection of wooden pallets, old electronic equipment, furniture, batteries and other materials. We also have an extensive, university-wide composting program that collects organic cafeteria scrap and landscaping waste. The cafeteria is a separate building that serves students, faculty and staff on campus. The landscaping waste is collected from the entire campus, including our project site. In fiscal year \'05 every building on campus collected the basic recyclables mentioned in MRp1, collecting 195 tons of material (173 tons paper, 11 tons cardboard, and 11 tons cans and bottles). We recycled an additional 453 tons of other materials (167 tons landscaping waste, 186 tons food waste, and 100 tons other recyclables), for a 233% increase in our overall recycling rate.We understand that ID credits are not awarded through the CIR process, but we would like to know if an ID credit can be achieved for campus-wide exemplary performance. The students who will live in our residence hall are also using our cafeteria and using the landscaped common areas that contribute to the composting collection. The residence halls, classrooms, libraries, cafeteria, and common spaces within our campus collectively represent one community and our recycling efforts are geared towards this community. We would also like to know the target percentage for exemplary performance in recycling. By how much must a project increase their recycling collection compared to what is collected for MRp1 to achieve an ID credit?

Ruling:

According to the IDc1.1 ruling on 3/8/04, the concept in your proposal is viable. In addition to the doubling of the Prerequisite 1 minimum materials benchmark (by weight, volume or recycling rate), an overall campus-wide recycling rate of 40% must be achieved in order to qualify for the point (40% is taken from LEED-EB MRc5). Landscape waste must not be factored into the volume of waste collected, as it is standard practice (and often regulated) to compost landscaping waste instead of sending it to landfill. All regulated wastes must also be excluded. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/19/2002
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ecologically Based Landscape Design and Pest Control: The project site is an urban infill site located in Sacramento, California. The project is an office building for the State of California, housing the Department of Education. Prior to the design and construction of the new office building, the site was a surface parking lot with a few trees surrounding the site on the perimeter. Adjacent to the project is a six-story apartment building and across from the site is the California State Capitol mall, a park like setting, with many differing plants and tree species represented. Contained within the project is a small pocket park, which separates the office building from the adjacent apartment building. The park was selected as a site for the State Arts in Architecture program, and a nationally known artist was selected for the art commission. In response to community outreach efforts, and in response to neighborhood concerns about open space, the Design Team for the project worked with the artist to develop a unique response. The team worked on the development of the landscape design using specific features listed below, coupled with the strategy of an ecologically based landscape management and maintenance program. The team also sought to use the project landscape as a means to educate and promote the use of organic based urban landscaping and agricultural farming and the use of beneficial insects as a substitute for pesticides. Features of the Ecologically based Landscape Design and Pest Control include: - An interpretive fountain and sculpture that uses gray water and that reflects the culture and environs of the Sierra Foothills; - Native plant materials, selected for their appropriateness to the climate, low water requirements, adaptation of the native cultural landscape of the region, and aesthetic appeal. Plant material was also selected for its ability to provide habitat for beneficial insects; - Organic landscape specifications including soil mix management, sub-surface drip irrigation, gray water and organic fertilizers; - An irrigation system that utilizes high efficiency drip technology and reduces water consumption by 63%; - A fertilizing and feeding plan, which includes a biological nutrient management using compost tea, injected into the irrigation system; - The project also has a retail component, designated as restaurant space. Once restaurant tenants are identified, the Design Team will work with the tenants to develop a composting process to recycle organic waste streams from the building and the restaurant tenants, including food waste, landscape pruning, etc. - Training of the building and grounds maintenance staff to monitor for insect pests and plant disease. Training the staff to release beneficial insects as the primary means of pest control, and training the staff to use soft pesticides and to avoid toxins. - Educational stations with plaques and graphics delineating the ecological methods utilized, beneficial insect and plant identification and their symbiotic relationships. - Consultation on pest problems and supplying beneficial insects to the project for the duration of the two-year warranty period. Question: Could this interpretive pocket park, developed with neighborhood concerns, educational goals and coupled with organic practices be considered an innovation point?

Ruling:

Yes, this project could attempt an innovation credit by addressing the education value of the "green" features of the park. A previous LEED Interpretation on the issue of an educational program in relation to buildings to achieve an innovation credit: please see Inquiry Number 0121-IDc11-092801. To summarize the earlier ruling, your project must be ACTIVELY instructional by including two of the three following elements: 1) comprehensive signage program to educate; 2) manual, guideline or case study to inform the design of other projects; 3) educational outreach program or guided tour focusing on sustainable living. As outlined in your inquiry, most of these elements are planned or already incorporated into the program in a very comprehensive way that reaches across many credit categories. Rather than focusing on a sustainable building education program as described in the previous inquiries, this project could focus on a sustainable site educational program that highlights green features throughout, as suggested in your narrative. You must be vigilant in your documentation of the measures described and provide adequate photos/drawings and other documentation along with narratives explaining your intent, the requirements, the submittals and the design approach, as directed in the Reference Guide. The opportunity to achieve innovation credits is designed for just such projects that either lie outside the existing LEED credits or exemplify exceptional performance in sustainability.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/19/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We recognize that ID credits cannot be granted achievement via the CIR process, but request the review of this proposed approach for viability to support a project earning an ID credit by meeting these requirements. Please provide insight as to the type & level of documentation required to pursue such an ID credit. Title Pursuit of Company\'s Mission Zero objectives through the application of sustainability programs to new building construction and operation. Credit Intent To incorporate the building into the Owner\'s Company Mission Zero objectives, the new facility has been designed & will be operated under the site\'s ISO systems. This includes the application of the Owner\'s unique corporate programs; QUEST, EcoSense and Ecometrics, to ensure the new facility is operated to high standards of sustainable practice. These proprietary programs form part of the Owner\'s Mission Zero program to reduce the footprint of a manufacturing facility to a virtual zero point by 2020. The project is the first in Asia to operate under such programs, covering all aspects of waste, materials & utility reduction as well as addressing less tangible social aspects of sustainability. Credit Requirements Consideration of the requirements of operating the new facility under the Company\'s Mission Zero programs has been applied in a holistic manner to the design. The choice of pursuing the LEED certification for the building was a key aspect of this approach, other considerations were the overall building design to incorporate a natural ventilation system, submetering of utilities, drainage system, improved staff facilities, etc Project Approach The building & all operations will be under the company\'s ISO systems and Mission Zero initiatives. These programs have been operating since 1998 for the current factory. The programs to be applied under Mission Zero are: ISO9000 Internationally recognized Quality Assurance program ISO14000 Internationally recognized environmental management system where all environmental aspects are encompassed, managed for environmental responsibility, audited & verified. The management system is used to administer all the sub-programs as follows: Ecometrics Comprehensive monitoring of the utilities / materials usage of activities in the facility & relating these to output of the plant. The program facilitates benchmarking, driving & verify of results in the pursuit of the Mission Zero goal. It is utilized to drive, monitor & demonstrate reduction in resource usage for the output of the operation and target of reducing the footprint of the operation to virtually zero by 2020. Materials usage & percentage recycled content Utility Usage & percentage renewable usage Waste generated & percentage recycled Transportation Energy costs QUEST System of financial accounting of the waste reduction programs which operates from a benchmark point to reduce costs of waste by 10% per annum The program monitors performance in the following areas Internal Off-Quality External Off-Quality Correction Costs Process Waste Material Usage Variances Energy Costs - Renewable / Nonrenewable Inventory Losses Packaging Costs Non-Quality related correction costs EcoSense A program to drive less measurable but important aspects of sustainability addressing areas such as Operation to recognized Quality & Environmental standards (ISO9000 & ISO 14000) Sustainability Awareness of Shareholders; Employees, Customers, Suppliers, Neighbors Safety standard improvements Transportation impacts - commuting/business travel/supply chain Sociometrics - monitoring of the efforts to improve the social aspects of sustainability Waste & Energy Reduction Projects - encouraging both large & small scale improvement projects to reduce Emissions Reduction - auditing of all facility emissions Life Cycle Assessment programs The intent of all of these company initiatives area a comprehensive strategy w/ triple bottom line quantifiable benefits beyond the manufacturing industry standard - documentation of metric results are available for all of these programs.

Ruling:

It is not clear how the requirements outlined in the proposal demonstrate quantitative environmental benefits beyond the requirements set by the LEED NC Rating System, and thus do not qualify for an innovation credit. Green strategies related to operations and maintenance policies are addressed through the LEED EB Rating System. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
3/21/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 296,000 sf medical center. We are requesting consideration and guidance for a potential Innovation and Design point for the inclusion of a Healing Garden and Outdoor Place of Respite in the design of the building and site. Using criteria from the Green Guide to Healthcare Guideline system we have created a Healing Garden on site that provides patients, visitors, and staff accessible outdoor Places of Respite that takes into account: security and safety, supervised, sun orientation and other microclimatic factors, direct connection to the natural environment and garden spaces, noise of mechanical equipment, accessibility, way finding and orientation, strength and stamina of patients, activity and interest, privacy and security and proximity to building entries and restrooms. The Garden also provides choices and variety in the design of spaces, engaging the senses of sight, sound, touch, smell and is integrated with native plantings and garden elements. The intent of the garden is to provide places for quiet reflection that assist in the process of healing of patients and provide for the physical, emotional and spiritual well being of all users. The garden is sized appropriately to meet the needs of patients. Interior lobbies and public spaces adjacent to the garden space allow for viewing of the garden in passing throughout the day as well as during inclement weather. A growing body of research shows that patients, medical staff and other care givers experience positive health benefits from access to daylight, landscape views and garden spaces. Providing a variety of spaces for people to pause and experience their natural surroundings is an important design and whole-healthcare objective. The spaces are universally accessible and provide a variety of seating areas for both ambulatory and wheelchair users. Suggested Documentation includes: Area Tabulations and ratios that show: - Net program summary. - Site Plan(s) highlighting public outdoor places of respite equal to 5% min. of project net program area. - Floor Plans and site plans highlighting indoor and outdoor places of respite dedicated for staff/occupants use equal to an additional 2% of project net program area. - Garden Plans and sections illustrating orientation, accessibility, proximity to interior services, Plant material types and quantities, hardscape material types, textures, etc.

Ruling:

Although Innovation in Design credits are not awarded through the CIR process, the proposed strategy is similar to LEED for Healthcare SSc9.1 Places of Respite. An innovation credit would be considered based on the requirements of this LEED credit. In addition to the requirements outlined in the inquiry above, please note that there are some additional requirements under LEED for Healthcare. For the complete credit requirements, please see http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=3468.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
3/11/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are seeking an Innovation in Design credit for the use of low-emitting insulation material. Intent Reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, potentially irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and wellbeing of installers and occupants. Requirements All insulation used in the building interior (defined as inside of the weatherproofing system) shall meet one of the testing and production requirements below: Option A: California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for The Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scaled Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda. OR Option B: GREENGUARD Children & Schools Certification (requirements are more stringent than those set forth by the Cal DHS Standard Practice for Testing of VOCs from Building Materials Using Small-Scaled Environmental Chambers) Submittals Provide the LEED-CI Letter Template, signed by the architect, interior designer or responsible party, listing all the insulation used in the tenant space and stating that they meet or exceed the applicable testing and product requirements. Background The basis for our request is that within LEED for Homes MRc2.2 Insulation is awarded 0.5 points if it complies with California Practice for Testing of VOCs from Building Materials Using Small Chambers. The effective use of insulation to minimize energy costs and improve control of environmental comfort with placement in the walls and above drop- ceilings of high-performance buildings has led to insulation being a highly utilized individual material in many LEED-CI buildings. Therefore, now more than ever, the assurance that insulation is not off-gassing harmful chemicals is an important step in assuring the health of all building occupants. Insulation is listed as one of a three component system under Option 6 - Ceiling and Wall Systems (LEED for Schools EQc4). We are proposing to have insulation identified as a stand-alone material due to its abundant use within a building. It is understood that LEED for Schools EQc4 allows up to 4 points for low-emitting materials. It is requested that insulation, by itself, as allowed in LEED for Homes MRc2.2 be eligible as an ID credit. To be consistent, this would be an option only if the project has not already received 4 points for low-emitting materials.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting confirmation that an innovation credit can be awarded for projects using building insulation that meets the California Practice for Testing of VOCs from Building Materials Using Small Chambers and/or is GREENGUARD Children & Schools certified. This strategy is acceptable for projects when the LEED project scope includes the installation of all roof, floor and wall insulation, and where all building insulation meets the indicated criteria. For CI projects where any roof, floor, or wall insulation is installed outside of the LEED project scope, and where all building insulation meets the indicated criteria, this strategy is only acceptable under SS Credit 1, Option L: Other Quantifiable Environmental Performance.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/8/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The purpose of this CIR is to request approval for one ID credit for an innovative approach to material reduction by using QuietRock soundproof drywall in lieu of multiple layers of traditional drywall. INTENT: To minimize the total quantity of new gypsum wallboard (drywall) used in acoustically sensitive buildings through accurate performance specifications, enhanced materials, and efficient design. The innovative approach will be applied to walls and partitions specified as acoustically high performance for interoffice privacy and/or noise control (sound transmission class 50 or higher). In some cases, a single layer of soundproof drywall can be used to replace up to five layers of traditional drywall. This product and design approach will result in a significant reduction in the total embodied energy of the materials used in the building. (The BEES software from NIST has reported that a single panel of drywall represents between 150,000 to 300,000 Btu\'s of embodied energy). REQUIREMENT: Minimize amount of building materials used by designing walls meeting the sound isolation requirement with QuietRock soundproof drywall. Demonstrate at least a 20% savings in the quantity of gypsum wallboard used compared to the baseline design using conventional, techniques and materials. SUBMITTALS: Architectural plans, details and specifications, a letter signed by the architect or acoustical engineer outlining the acoustical performance requirements identified in the design, the measures implemented in the approach, photographs of soundproofing measures under construction, bills of sale of soundproofing drywall materials purchased, and calculations demonstrating at least a 20% savings in the quantity of drywall used compared with conventional, baseline construction techniques and materials. DESIGN APPROACH: For a two-story multi-purpose commercial building, areas of the floor plan require additional noise control (due to amplified lecture halls or private workspaces). Well established performance specifications required that these walls perform to an STC 50 or higher. These partitions have been designed using QuietRock, an innovative soundproof drywall, so that an over 20% material reduction is achieved. The process was as follows: 1. All walls with a sound isolation requirement have been reviewed by a qualified professional to assess/confirm minimum performance requirements and alternate, material-optimized assemblies were recommended. 2. Acoustical walls requiring multiple layers of gypsum drywall have been redesigned using layer(s) of soundproof drywalls in their place. 3. Architectural details have been added that address acoustical seal and closure best practices for optimal sound isolation. 4. Per CIR 12/6/2002 and 1/9/2003, the basic steps for Boeing to achieve an ID Credit for Material Reduction will be: - Provide documentation, such as a narrative and drawings, to prove on the validity of the baseline to which the project is compared. - Provide a convincing and thorough analysis of this condition by a knowledgeable professional, such as an acoustical engineer or an architect. - The actual bill of materials purchased and a spreadsheet comparing quantities & costs. - A letter signed by a responsible party enumerating and certifying the product and building methods. Should this credit be audited, the applicant also should be prepared to provide photographs of the soundproof wallboard installation in the field.

Ruling:

It should be noted that innovation credits can not be awarded in the CIR process. The approach with one material is not enough to warrant an ID credit. If the project team can submit a holistic approach which includes walls, ceilings, etc., we would consider granting an ID credit. Please note that USGBC does not certify, endorse or promote any products, services or companies, nor do we track, list or report data related to products and their environmental qualities. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/29/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Title: Educational Outreach Program Intent: To broaden the public\'s knowledge and awareness of green building strategies from a lessons learned perspective and to use the facility as a full scale example. The intent of the design team is to submit for an Innovation and Design Credit for an Educational Outreach Program. The project is a Car Wash & Maintenance Facility (hereafter referred to as the Facility) for a major Metropolitan Transit Agency. Due to the nature of the Facility the building is not generally open to the public. Use of the facility is limited to staff and organized visitations, thus onsite general public education would not be lucrative. Instead of an onsite educational program the Agency has accomplished / will be accomplishing the following: Educational Outreach: Project was featured in the Agency\'s "Going Green" brochure that was distributed on Earth Day. The use of captured rain water at the new Facility was a component of the Agency\'s "Earth Day" car posters distributed throughout the car fleet. The Agency\'s web site prominently features the Facility and has an animation of the Car Washer showing the captured / recycled rain water feature. Also, this website has recently been upgraded, as required by an Executive Order of the Governor, to be "accessible" to the hearing/visually impaired. Educational flyers on the Building will be available at the main lobby to visitors. Presentations: Presented a paper on the project at the Railroad Environmental Conference at UIUC in 2002. (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) "Green" features of the new Maintenance Facility and Car Washer were part of the Transit Agency\'s "Building for Tomorrow" brochure and presentation at the UITP Conference on Sustainable Design. This was also presented at the APTA conference on the environment given in NYC. Tours: A delegation from MetroVal (Valencia Metro, Venezuela) went on a tour through the facility. There are also additional plans for a group of engineering students from Colombia University to tour the Facility. Awards: Applied for and received a "Green Apple" award (honorable mention) from NYC/DOB and the US-EPA for Green Building Design. Design Guidelines: Established Design Guidelines for "Sustainability" for implementation throughout the Capital Program that were a direct result of the Green Design efforts on this project. We propose to submit copies of all the brochures created as part of this outreach program as well as website information for viewing. This project is not the typical project for which LEED NC was originally designed. As a major Metropolitan Transit Agency - the project is very high profile and thus contributes to the expansion of green building into the mainstream. As such, we feel that these efforts should obtain an Innovation & Design credit. Please let us know if these efforts will garner us an additional credit and if not, what we may do to accomplish this under this specific type of facility and ownership. Additionally, we would also like to know what submittals will be necessary to establish sufficient evidentiary information for the USGBC review.

Ruling:

Your education and outreach program is eligible for an innovation point. It meets the general requirements established in the credit ruling dated 9/24/01. To document these strategies in your LEED certification submittal, please include the information from your CIR narrative and provide a copy of the Design Guidelines for Sustainability and other materials. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/2/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 26,000 square foot tenant space for a confidential client, a news provider. We will be utilizing LEED-CI. We\'re wondering if our limited-wall office space qualifies for an Innovation Credit. The space plan for the office will not include walls/partitions. The entire space will utilize an open office furniture system. Obviously there will be walls for restrooms and mechanical spaces but private offices and kitchen areas will not have hard walls. Intent Minimize materials and construction waste due by avoiding the construction of walls for private offices and kitchen area. Requirements We will calculate the amount of material (gypsum, metal studs etc.) our project will save (as well as construction waste avoided) based on the assumption that other offices similar to ours consist of 25% hardwalled areas. We will quantify the amount of CO2 saved from the extraction, manufacturing, and shipping of material which we will be saving by not constructing any hard walls.

Ruling:

The applicant is proposing an innovation in design credit for limiting constructed walls within a 26,000 square foot tenant space. While space planning such as this has clear advantages, it is simply good facilities management practice where "churn" is inevitable. The proposed strategy, while laudable, does not warrant the award of an innovation credit. Please refer to IDc1.2 CIR ruling dated 11/3/2006. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/23/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a three story laboratory facility in the city of Port St. Lucie Florida. The project has used an exterior coating system with a higher heat reflectance value than the values of conventional coatings. This credit interpretation request is to inquire about submitting the coating system used, to apply for a credit for reduced heat island effect for non-roof surfaces. The Total Solar Reflectance (TSR) values of the exterior coatings used in the building were tested using a D&S reflectometer according to ASTM C1549-04. The TSR value of the BML-01 "White" color used was 82.9% and the TSR value for the PPG522-3 "Water Chestnut" color used was 74.5%. To prove merit for one point under LEED, we have followed the guidelines of the LEED reference guide to document Sustainable Sites Credit 7.1-Heat island effect non-roof. The baseline case and design case were calculated using the exterior wall surface area and 50% of the site hardscape area. The baseline case was calculated using 43.7% solar reflectance for conventional beige paint to match the color used in the building and 35% for new gray concrete hardscape. The design case was calculated using 74.5% solar reflectance for the Water Chestnut coating used and 5% for new asphalt hardscape. Using Ecotect and site specific data the building was modeled with the correct north orientation. Ecotect calculated the incident solar radiation that strikes the north, south, east and west walls, and the hardscape surfaces annually in Wh. The incident solar radiation value for the four facades and the hardscape were added, and multiplied by the solar reflectance values to determine the site reflected solar energy. The analysis showed that 61% of solar energy would have been reflected using conventional paint and new gray concrete, but instead we are reflecting 77% of the total solar energy incident on the site using a coating with a higher heat reflectance value. We would like to know if this approach of using exterior coatings with higher reflectance values to lower heat island effect on non-roof surfaces will be acceptable to document one innovation in design point.

Ruling:

The project is proposing to earn an innovation point for using high heat reflectance value exterior wall surfaces. Please note that Innovation & Design points are not awarded through the CIR process. As described, this approach is not eligible for an ID credit at this time. Currently, no standard methodology, metric, or baseline assessment exists for exterior wall heat island effect reduction. The proposed methodology (EcoTect modeling), metric (solar reflectance), and baseline do not address heat island effect reduction as currently outlined in the LEED Rating System (using solar reflectance index - SRI). Furthermore, as this proposal is suggesting a modified exemplary performance compliance path, the requirements of SSc7.1 would first need to be met. Based on the details provided above, it is not clear if SSc7.1 would be achieved. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/24/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Green Building Educational Component This project intends to provide a two-part educational package as part of its process. This will consist of the following: 1. A display system comprised of small iconographic signs throughout the facility highlighting where green strategies have been employed. These icons will then be complemented by a display panel in the main cafeteria space which highlights what the green building strategies are, and some of the impacts. Rather than put text-based signs throughout the facility, the icons will remind people as they move through the space that there is something green there. All employees go to the cafeteria several times a day, and this way the centralized panel can highlight the environmental impact of each piece of the building. For example an icon at the parking lot can highlight how much the hybrid vehicle parking spaces are reducing emissions. An icon at the toilet rooms can highlight how many gallons of water are going to be saved each year. By having the icons spread throughout the facility we can illustrate how pervasive our green strategies are. 2. A case study book or website, tied in to graphics of the building, which will highlight materials and strategies used throughout the facility. It will be cross-referenced with synergistic efforts made in the owner\'s corporate office center, also under construction and also seeking LEED certification. This resource will include both materials used, design strategies employed, and local suppliers and professionals involed in the project, such as construction entities, local waste recyclers, etc. This case study book or website will be shared with the USGBC and the Pittsburgh Green Building Alliance (GBA). Please review and let us know if this approach will meet the intent of the CIR from 9/24/2001 regarding educational programs for Innovation in Design points, and whether this approach is likely to be awarded a point if submitted.

Ruling:

To meet the requirements for an innovation credit for education, as outlined in previous CIR rulings, signage must be built into the building\'s spaces and comprehensively addresses the green building strategies employed in the project. A case study must inform the design of other buildings based on the success of this project. The strategies described meet this intent. Credits are not awarded through the CIR process and achievement will be based on the documents formally submitted. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/3/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

LEED CI Version 2.0 does not address energy associated with domestic water heaters. (water heaters are not rated by energy star and are not part of HVAC in EAc1.3) Our CI project is a laboratory and preliminary energy models indicate the domestic water heating energy could be as much as the lighting energy. Lighting energy is allotted several points under EAc1.1. We propose the following innovation point: Intent: Achieve increasing levels of energy conservation beyond the prerequisite standard. Requirements: Increase water heater efficiency to 85% or higher (when the ASHRAE 90.1-2004 mandatory value is 80%) Submittals: Provide cut sheets of all water heaters indicating they are greater than 85% efficient Please let us know if this approach seems acceptable for an innovation point.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting approval of a proposed Innovation in Design (ID) credit for energy savings associated with water heaters. Commercial water heaters are currently not rated by the EnergyStar system and, therefore until such time, residential water heater efficiency may be included in the calculations for EAc1.4. To be eligible for an ID credit, calculations should show a minimum of 15% reduction in domestic hot water energy use over code. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/22/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Title: Whole Building Double Water Filtration to Obviate the Need for Bottled Water Intent: To minimize or eliminate the use of plastic water bottles in buildings by providing the purity levels afforded by bottled water through comprehensive building water filtration. The bottled water industry has grown substantially in the past decade. About 74% of Americans drink bottled water; one in five drinks only bottled. Demand is outstripping recycling capacity. According to the Container Recycling Institute, each year an ever smaller proportion of plastic bottles are recycled; from 2 out of 5 in the mid \'90s, to only 1 out of 7 today. Seventy million water bottles are disposed of each day, with 60 million going into landfills, oceans or incinerators. Our project plans to implement a two-stage water filtration system that provides water purity equal to or better than bottled water. Implementing water filtration technology is an answer to the severe environmental impact of bottled water, because it reconciles people\'s desire for pure, safe drinking water with the imperative of reducing waste. By installing two-stage water filtration - first at the main (point-of-entry, POE) and then downstream within kitchen cabinets (point-of-use, POU) -- and educating our occupants about the health and environmental advantages of the system, we anticipate a dramatic reduction in the purchase of bottled water in our building and associated waste. The two-stage configuration, and the specific equipment selected, are designed so as to minimize environmental impact by 1) at POE using negligible water for self-cleaning, and 2) at POU achieving significant filter cartridge longevity. Requirements: - Provide building-wide point-of-entry water filtration that removes particulate contamination equal to or smaller than 10 microns; AND - Provide point-of-use water filtration at 0.2 micron (fine enough to remove bacteria) and NSF/ANSI Standard 42 and 53 certified. AND - Educate building occupants about the system, how it works and its substantial environmental benefits. Benefits: - Obviate the need for bottled water by providing high performance and low impact two-stage water filtration that will substantially reduce the amount of plastic water bottles going to waste from our building. - Reduce the exposure to potentially harmful waterborne contaminants for the entire population through universal access to filtered water. - Reduce the energy required to heat water by screening out particulates that over time negatively impact system efficiency. - Reduce the amount of pollutants released in the manufacture and transportation of bottled water attributable to our building. There are 70 million bottles of water consumed in the US per day. Dividing that number by the total population of approximately 306,000,000, means that 23% of the US population is drinking one bottle of water a day. We believe this estimate to be conservative and that widespread adoption of two-stage water filtration could have a much bigger impact, especially in areas with known water quality problems. We estimate that our 1200 apartment project will have 2130 occupants. Therefore, 23% of 2130 = 479 people drinking one bottle of water a day times 365 days/yr = 174,835 bottles for this one building resulting in a reduction of 149,858 (6 out of 7) bottles going to landfill, oceans or incineration. New occupants will be given an orientation session at the time of lease by the property manager explaining the dual system, the POU maintenance requirements and why the cost and environmental impact of bottled water can be avoided in the building. The tenant environmental guideline will also detail the environmental impact of bottled water and describe the system benefits and performance. The filtration system will be a highlighted feature on all leasing and green building tours.

Ruling:

Installation of a water filtration system, with the intent of eliminating the use of plastic water bottles is an acceptable effort for achieving an Innovation in Design credit, as long as calculations and policy/program descriptions are provided as required by posted CIR ruling dated 11/15/2007, showing the quantifiable benefits that may result from the reduction of waste and transportation. Please provide the policy/program document which details the environmental impact of bottled water use and describes the system benefits and performance. Policy/program descriptions must also confirm that the building?provided filtered water will be available at 100% of kitchen sinks throughout the building, and that maintenance of all filtration system components and point?of?use filter replacement will be provided by the building owner per manufacturer\'s guidelines. For core and shell projects, these requirements will need to be part of a legally binding agreement with the tenants, such as a tenant lease or sales agreement. As part of the program/policy document project team will be required to outline an orientation program to educate building occupants about this sustainable feature of the building and the expected use of filtered water from sinks instead of bottled water; consider adding other green features on the building to this orientation. Documentation of the filtration system, education policy, and sales or lease agreement will need to be provided for certification. ***This CIR Ruling has been updated on 9/14/2009*** Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/19/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 320,000 s.f. mixed-use project being designed and constructed to achieve various LEED NC 2.2 credits. The mixed use components consist of residential units, residential parking and commercial tenant space (shell only). The project is located in Solano County, CA. We are seeking an innovation credit for a Comprehensive Transportation plan based on the ID credit previously approved on 5/9/2003 The INTENT of this innovation credit is to provide occupants of the building additional options for Alternative Transportation and reduce the drive alone trips through the use of a Transportation Management Plan. The project is currently pursuing three SS 4 baseline credits including: a. Project is located within 1/4 mile of Bus service. b. Bicycle Storage is provided for residents and retail customers and employees. c. Preferred Parking is provided for low emitting/ fuel efficient vehicles . The Comprehensive Transportation Plan will include the following additional elements: a. The developer will provide free conferencing facilities to accommodate flexible work schedules and reduce the drive alone trips. A conference room with infrastructure for video conferencing/ telecommuting will be provided for use by residents. b. The Solano County Transportation Authority provides a number of transportation amenities/ alternates for its residents and information on the same will be displayed in the lobby and included in the Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions. Information and amenities include: i. Maps/ schedules/ contact info for Public Transportation ii. Information on incentives provided by Solana County Transportation Authority including: 1. Emergency Ride Home Program 2. "Bucks for Bikes" program (Up to 60% -$100 max of the cost of a bicycle) 3. Commuter Check Program 4. Carpool/ Vanpool incentives (Up to $100 Gas Card) c. The developer will provide 10 free bicycles for the use of residents. Bicycle maintenance and replacement will subsequently be part of the Home Owner\'s Association Submittals will include a. A floor plan showing conferencing facility within residential development. b. Copy of CCRs outlining available public transportation amenities. c. Commitment letter or receipt from developer for 10 bicycles.

Ruling:

This CIR is requesting that the project\'s listed transportation management measures be evaluated for compliance with an innovation in design credit. Innovation credits are awarded during the certification process, not through the CIR process. This ruling is provided as guidance about the likely outcome if accomplishments are proven by the certification submittals. The project is likely to be awarded the credit if the following items are clearly documented: 1) Achievement of SSc4.1, 4.2, and 4.4. 2) Access to the on-site workspace for all occupants for at least five years. 3) Construction and maintenance of the transportation information kiosk, including information on: rideshares, commuter checks, local transit options, and guaranteed ride home programs for at least five years. 4) Bike purchase or subsidies for 5 years, or 50 bicycles, whichever comes first. This ruling assumes that the mixed use project is essentially residential for the purposes of the credit. Per the SSc4.4 CIR ruling of 4/4/2005, the project is considered residential if the commercial square footage is less than 10% of the entire building. For further reference, a number of transportation management compliance strategies have been outlined in the "Innovation in Design Credit Catalog" available at http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=3569 in addition to the precedent identified in the CIR ruling of 5/9/2003 cited. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/23/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following proposed innovation in design credit language is intended to demonstrate accomplishment of Comprehensive Formaldehyde Reduction above and beyond requirements set forth in existing LEED credits. We recognize that an ID credit cannot be granted achievement through the CIR process, but request the review of this proposed approach for viability and appropriateness as written to support a project earning an ID credit by meeting these requirements. Proposed Title: Comprehensive Formaldehyde Reduction Intent: Provide a safe and healthy environment for both construction teams and building occupants. Requirements: Meet the requirements of existing LEED credits associated with formaldehyde reduction AND comply with the additional measures outlined below in order to obtain a comprehensive formaldehyde reduction in the building. To accomplish this, the following are required: ? Specify low formaldehyde emitting products/appliances for each of the following if/as incorporated in the project: o Composite wood and agrifiber- meet LEED-NC EQc4.4 credit requirements o Formaldehyde free insulation ? Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control- meet LEED EQp2 credit requirements ? Thermal Comfort: Design- meet LEED-NC EQc7.1 credit requirements Submittal: In addition to all corresponding submittal requirements for existing LEED credits, document specific efforts to reduce formaldehyde, and describe how a comprehensive formaldehyde reduction throughout the building that address control and mitigation has been realized. Design Approach: ? Source Control: minimize formaldehyde sources from being introduced to the building interior ? Mitigation: maintain indoor air quality with low formaldehyde presence ? Identify sources of formaldehyde within the building design above and beyond insulation, and specify low formaldehyde or formaldehyde free alternatives. ? Consider appropriateness and occupant need for mechanical and/or natural ventilation while evaluating site conditions and building design. Avoid venting to areas of heavy traffic, nearby polluting industries and neighboring waste management sites. ? Minimal use of foamed in place insulation ? Wash durable-press fabrics before installation (e.g.: drapes) ? Systems furniture and seating- meet LEED-CI EQc4.5 credit requirements ? Increased ventilation- meet LEED-NC EQc2 credit requirements ? Maintain moderate temperature and humidity levels o Controllability of systems: Thermal Comfort- meet LEED-NC EQc6.2 credit requirements ? Minimize gases from combustion sources from entering interior spaces o Combustion venting- meet LEED-H IEQc2 credit requirements o Vehicles emissions protection- meet LEED-H IEQc10 credit requirements ? Monitor air quality o Outdoor air delivery monitoring- meet LEED-NC EQc1 credit requirements o Install formaldehyde sensor

Ruling:

The proposed requirements for an ID credit related to formaldehyde would not justify achievement of an ID credit. The proposed requirements add insulation to the materials regulated in EQc4.4 and require simultaneous achievement of a prerequisite (EQp2) and EQc7.1. These proposed requirements do not represent a comprehensive approach to control of formaldehyde contents and emissions. Items mentioned in the "Design Approach" do, however, represent potential ID credits. For example, projects may earn an ID credit for using systems furniture and seating that meets LEED-CI EQc4.5. Also, an enhanced indoor air quality monitoring system that includes formaldehyde and other VOC measurements may justify an ID credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/30/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent: "To provide design teams and projects the opportunity to be awarded points for exemplary performance above the requirements set by LEED-CS Green Building Rating System and/or innovative performance in Green Building categories not specifically addressed by the LEED-CS Green Building Rating System." We are presenting this CIR in order to receive guidance about the likely outcome of the proposed Innovation Credit if accomplishments are proven by the certification submittals. INTENT To educate tenants on lifestyle changes that can improve their physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing; build a sense of community; enhance the work environment; and promote alternative modes of transportation. REQUIREMENTS Provide tenants with access to a Working Well Program (WWP) for a minimum of three years. Provide a WWP coordinator on site three days per week. He/she shall be responsible for; organizing all activities, marketing events, conducting monthly special events, and recruiting other wellness experts as required, preparing regular reports for evaluation by management and an annual executive summary highlighting participation and tenant feedback, and delivering a wellness activities plan to the tenants on a monthly basis. SUBMITTALS Provide the letter template signed by the developer declaring that a WWP coordinator has been engaged for a minimum of three years. Provide a copy of the agreement between the Developer and WWP coordinator demonstrating that the Program will be provided for at least three years. If an audit is requested during the certification process: Provide a copy of the annual activity plan, including a brief description of each event and schedule. Provide a copy of tenant agreement sections or information package outlining the structure and costs of the WWP available to the tenant. DESIGN STRATEGIES The Program will serve to educate employees on the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Seminars and activities should be used to promote alternative modes of transportation such as walking and cycling for increased fitness and reduced pollution. The public transportation and bicycle storage and shower facilities available to tenants will be promoted through the WWP, thus increasing their use and furthering the intent of the Sustainable Sites credits. The health and wellness information and activities should be selected such that they increase productivity through improved morale, reduced sick-time, and reduced workplace injuries. Communication between the WWP Coordinator and the Tenant should be ongoing to assess the demand for certain activities and information sessions to increase employee involvement. A tenant representative should be appointed to ensure that the needs of the tenant are being met by the WWP. Environmentally-friendly activities should be emphasized and specialists in sustainable living should be included in the education aspect of the Program. Sample WWP activities and features include:

Ruling:

The applicant is asking whether the proposed Working Well program is likely to be accepted as an innovation credit. Although innovation credits are not awarded through the CIR process, this proposal does not provide adequate justification of the environmental benefits of the program, and the human health benefits do not directly relate to the design, construction or operations of the building, which are the focus of the LEED-CS rating system. As stated in the CIR, the program is provided as an option for all tenants - there is no requirement or guarantee that any will participate. Further, the benefits of alternative transportation are already awarded through existing SSc4 credits. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following Innovation & Design CIR is being submitted to assess whether the following criteria could qualify for an ID credit if all standards are met and documentation received: Intent - To provide a mechanism to support novel ideas to improve the environment at Union College. Through a competitive grant-based initiative, members of the Union College community have access to a $16,000 per year pool of funding to either make Union operations more sustainable or to conduct research that will make specific contributions to sustainability at the regional, national or global scale. Grant proposals are required to detail rationale, a project/research plan, anticipated outcome, detailed budget, and timeline, and are rated based on the benefit to environmental sustainability and feasibility. In the 2008-2009 academic year, ten different projects proposed by students, staff and faculty were awarded between $500 and $2000. With the opening of a new USustain headquarters located in Wold Science Center, the office of President Stephen Ainlay has committed to funding for two more academic years. Projects that directly impact the design and operations of the Wold Science Center or research projects that would be undertaken at the Wold Science Center will be especially encouraged. Requirement - Union will support grassroots sustainability ideas for the period 2009-2011. Supported projects will include specific reporting guidelines and communication procedures. The period of funding shall cover a period of no less than two academic years, for a total monetary amount of $48,000. Submittals - Presidential Green Grant RFP (Sept. 2008); Summaries of 2008-2009 proposals funded by Presidential Green Grants.

Ruling:

The innovation credit is based on the merits of the Union College providing funding in support of grassroots sustainability ideas that can impact the operations of the Union, or support research that contributes to sustainability at the regional, national or global scale. While the grant program is clearly focused on environmental issues and is commendable, it is unclear how this directly correlates to the design, construction or operations of the LEED project itself. It should be noted that for the LEED for New Construction rating system, innovation credits are awarded for green building strategies (not covered in the rating system) that demonstrate a comprehensive approach with significant, measurable environmental benefits. If the grant program was specifically (and only) focused on making the operations of the LEED project more sustainable, it may be possible to earn an innovation credit if specific measures were adopted based on the LEED for Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance rating system for example. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/9/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

EDITED 5/7/07 to include CSI Masterformat 1995 Division 12 in calculations. INQUIRY: In an effort to help stimulate the development of environmentally focused product evaluation and certification tools for use by building professionals, USGBC is seeking to establish an innovation point for specification of products certified under the Cradle to Cradle (C2C) program. This program is explained at http://www.mbdc.com/certified.html. C2C Certification provides manufacturers with a means to measure achievement in environmentally intelligent design and helps customers purchase and specify products that are pursuing a broader definition of quality. Through C2C, this means using environmentally safe and healthy materials; design for material reutilization, such as recycling or composting; energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy; efficient use of water, and maximum water quality associated with production; and instituting strategies for social responsibility. If a candidate product achieves the necessary criteria, it is certified as a Silver, Gold or Platinum product or as a Technical/Biological Nutrient (available for homogeneous materials or less complex products), and can be labeled as Cradle to Cradle. USGBC suggests the following Intent, Requirements and Submittals for this Innovation in Design application: Intent: Help stimulate the development of environmentally focused product evaluation and certification tools for use by building professionals. Requirements: Use Cradle to Cradle Certified building materials and products for 2.5% of the total value of all building materials and products used in the project, based on cost. The "cost value" of products for the purposes of this calculation will be discounted by 50% for Silver level products and those identified only as "technical or biological nutrients", and doubled for products certified at the platinum level: Cost value of products = ((Silver & nutrients) x 0.5) + Gold + (Platinum x 2) Submittals: Spreadsheet matrix with the following information: DEFAULT MATERIALS VALUE Total construction costs (hard costs for CSI Master Format 1995 Divisions 2-10 and 12** only): _______ Default materials cost (total Divisions 2-10 and 12** construction cost x 0.45): _______ OR ACTUAL MATERIALS VALUE Actual materials cost (excluding labor and equipment) hard costs for CSI Master Format 1995 Divisions 2-10 and 12** only): _______ - Material Name/Description - Manufacturer - Total Material Cost ($) - Percent Of Product C2C Certified (% by Weight) - Compliant Product Value - Adjusted value (Silver and nutrients x 0.5, Platinum x2) Total "cost value" ($) of C2C certified materials: _______ C2C certified material value as a percentage of total materials cost*: _______ *To qualify for this ID credit the percentage of C2C certified materials must be at least 2.5% of the total materials cost **CSI Master Format 1995 Division 12 may be included in calculations if materials from Division 12 are used consistently with calculations in credits MRc3-7 in LEED-NC or MRc3-6 in LEED-CS. LEED-CI projects are required to include Division 12 components in the calculation of this ID point, as these components are required for calculations in CI credits MRc4-7. Please refer to the LEED-CI Reference Guide\'s credit calculation instructions for guidance in calculating these credits.

Ruling:

RULING by the MR TAG (April 6, 2007): The MR Technical Advisory Group has determined that the proposal encourages innovation through product improvement and is thus acceptable for an innovation point, given proper documentation upon LEED application. In approving this proposal, the TAG notes the following: 1) The TAG has concerns about the lack of transparency in the C2C certification process; 2) There are other product evaluation and certification tools that may be considered for similar acknowledgment through the CIR process; 3) The TAG and others intend to work towards establishing a set of criteria for product evaluation and certification tools that are referenced in LEED, whether in innovation points or in rating system credit language; and 4) Once those criteria have been established, it will be necessary to revisit whether or not proposed innovation points based on this draft language should continue to be approved.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can a project earn ID credit for being in a LEED ND neighborhood? What level of certification or stage or review must the project have completed?

Ruling:

Yes, a project can earn ID credit for being in a LEED for Neighborhood Development certified project. The LEED-ND project must be certified, not just registered. LEED-ND projects at any certification level (Certified through Platinum) and any stage of certification (Stage 1, 2, or 3) are eligible.
**Update October 1, 2013 - The ruling below is no longer valid for project registered after 7/1/2013. As many prerequisites and credits within LEED-ND and LEED-NC address similar concepts, simply locating a NC project within LEED-ND neighborhood is not considered innovative and in some cases, can lead to double-counting the use of the same strategy in both Rating Systems.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/20/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The goal of this CIR request is to confirm that it is viable for a project filing under LEED-NC v.2.2 to look to credits and credit requirements under LEED-EB v.2.0 (specifically three credits under the heading of Building Operation & Maintenance) as the basis of one of its ID credits. Specifically, a large private university in the mid-west has a growing commitment to sustainability and green design. It is currently constructing several new dormitories and student support/activity spaces (5 buildings total) which are targeting LEED-NC v. 2.2 Silver at a minimum. This university realizes that sustainable practices don\'t end when construction of these new dormitories and buildings is complete and they receive their LEED certification. Consistent with their plans to use the LEED for Existing Buildings program in the future to enhance campus operations and maintenance of buildings, this university plans to extend sustainable practices into the life and maintenance of these new dormitories and student support/activity buildings by adapting "appropriate operations and maintenance of buildings and building systems so that they continue to deliver target building performance goals over the long term." (LEED for Existing Buildings v 2.0 Reference Guide, page 213.) Also important, this university is looking to its experiences building and implementing a long-term Building Operation and Maintenance Plan at these new dormitories and student support/activity buildings as a test case for all five of its campuses. Basis of Building Operation & Maintenance at these new Dormitories and Student Support/Activity Buildings: This university looks to LEED-EB v. 2.0 for the basic standards in it Building Operations and Maintenance Program: Specifically: 1. LEED-EB, v 2.0 EA Credit 3.1: Building Operation & Maintenance, Staff Education; 2. LEED-EB, v2.0 EA Credit 3.2: Building Operation & Maintenance, Building Systems Maintenance; and 3. LEED-EB, v2.0 EA Credit 3.3: Building Operation & Maintenance, Building Systems Monitoring; This university also looks to LEED-NC v. 2.2 standards and monitoring criteria. Specifically: 1. LEED-NC, v2.2 EA Credit 3: Enhanced Commissioning; 2. LEED-NC, v2.2 EA Credit 5: Measurement & Verification; and 3. LEED-NC, v2.2 EQ Credit 1: Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring. Action Plan: Within the context of the above LEED-EB v. 2.0 and LEED-NC v. 2.2 standards, Building Operations and Maintenance at this university will follow the following four basic strategies: 1. Commissioning, through design and 10 months into occupancy; 2. Maintenance & Operations Staff Continuing Education and Training; 3. Building Systems Maintenance; and 4. Building Systems Monitoring (M&V, Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring, Johnson Controls). In terms of the ID credit filing for this project, the project team describes how this university and this new dormitory and student support/activities spaces project meets and, in some cases, exceeds the credit criteria for the above three LEED-EB EA Credits 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3. Is this a viable ID credit for its LEED-NC v. 2.2 filing?

Ruling:

The project team has proposed an ID credit for meeting or exceeding the credit criteria for the three LEED-EB v2.0 EAc3 Building Operation & Maintenance credits: EAc3.1 Staff Education; EAc3.2 Building Systems Maintenance; and EAc3.3 Building Systems Monitoring. The project is purposing to integrate the design with the operations and maintenance of the building to continue good practice and promote energy efficiency during operations. The proposed credits from LEED-EB 2.0, have been modified for the current version. And the credits are now awarded for strategies that would receive credit under LEED-NC EAc5 Measurement and Verification. Therefore meeting the requirements of LEED-EB EAc3.1 & 3.2 is not sufficient for achievement of an ID credit. The proposed building staff education is a required component for LEED-NC EAc3 Enhanced Commissioning, and therefore also not sufficient for achievement of an ID credit. However, if the project wishes to implement other strategies from the current LEED-EB rating system for which credit is not already awarded under LEED-NC, the project is encouraged to do so. In addition, please note the LEED EB rating system has been upgraded as LEED EB: Operations and Maintenance. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/30/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This request seeks ID credit approval for an energy- and resource-saving, paperless, Web-based collaboration solution for architecture, engineering and construction project team members from multiple organizations (i.e. owner, construction management firm, general contractor, architecture firm, engineering firm, subcontractors, suppliers, etc.): our Virtual Project Office. We have used our experience with delivering consulting services and training on project management technologies to develop this customizable, easy-to-use Microsoft SharePoint-based tool; it is a private, secure, project-specific Web site. Our innovative solution helps project participants efficiently share and process vital documents like drawings, RFIs and contracts--all while slashing printing, shipping and travel energy- and resource-usage. Owners and contractors from multiple organizations can collaborate to make informed and timely decisions when they exchange and store data in a project\'s own secure, neutral, Web-based \'office,\' rather than using paper to print draft after draft of large files (i.e. drawings, specs, contracts, change notices, payment estimates, submittals, RFIs, correspondence, safety bulletins, contact directories, schedules, calendars, announcements, transmittals, progress photos, progress reports, meeting minutes, etc.) Any and every process our project requires can, and will, be incorporated into our Virtual Project Office. For example, when the project team is ready to request bids from contractors, we will use our paperless, Web-based Virtual Project Office to issue Requests for Proposals (RFPs), provide bidding instructions, and announce up-to-date questions and answers. We will be able to post downloadable construction documents such as drawings and project specs. Contractors will then upload their bids electronically, automatically notifying the bid manager--via e-mail--of their submission. Housing all bidding information in one secure, collaborative online workspace dramatically reduces the typical energy and resource consumption of the bidding process, supports confident contract-award decisions, and gets the project off to a successful start. We will use our collaboration solution to: Connect team members across organizational and geographic boundaries so they can collaborate regardless of their time and place of work--without spending energy, resources, money or time on paper, shipping or travel. Streamline review-and-approval processes (i.e. RFPs, RFIs, submittals, change notices, payment estimates, etc.) and make them electronic, eliminating the energy costs and delays of printing and shipping multiple copies of paper documents back and forth among project participants. Notify collaborators automatically via (paperless) e-mail when virtual documents are added and updated. Reduce energy- and resource-consuming litigation by mitigating all parties\' risk exposure with automatic auditing of revisions, ball-in-court requests, and responses. Protect private information using our secure, neutral collaboration platform, limiting each party\'s vulnerability to energy- and resource-consuming claims. Take advantage of seamless interoperability, configuration, training and support--eliminating potential energy and resource expenditures associated with printing and shipping training manuals and/or booking travel for consultants, instructors and attendees. Archive automatically--online--to incorporate Best Practices and Lessons Learned as standards, and build on the project team\'s successes.

Ruling:

The project team is proposing an Innovation in Design credit based on the merits of using a Web-based platform for document management, reducing the energy and resources consumed on administration and communication during the design and construction process. While it is agreed that this has the potential to reduce resource and energy use over the conventional project administrative process, it is not considered innovative as many project teams have adopted this technology. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
8/4/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ergonomics Strategy

Ruling:

Intent: To create and maintain a flexible ergonomic environment that properly accommodates building users and promotes healthy, comfortable and productive work.
Requirements: Develop and implement a comprehensive ergonomics strategy that will have a positive impact on human health and comfort when performing daily activity for at least 75% of Full Time Equivalent building users. This strategy must include the four components listed below.
1. Identify activities and building functions for which ergonomic enhancement (i.e., ergonomic strategies which exceed standard industry practice) is both possible and desirable through education and equipment. -. Building users should be consulted on their preferences wherever possible. NOTE: Project teams are encouraged to consult one or more of the existing ergonomics standards and guidelines when identifying ergonomic enhancement opportunities. For computer workstations, these include the BIFMA G1, the ANSI/HFES 100-2007, and CSA Z412-00. The US Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has developed ergonomic guidelines specifically for the following industries: Shipyards, Poultry, Retail Grocery Stores, Nursing Homes, and Meatpacking. OSHA also provides helpful information for many other industries in addition to those listed here (please see the Resources section below).
2. Define a set of performance goals and expectations for the ergonomics strategy that address productivity, comfort, and health. Develop a plan and design process to meet them. Provide procedures to track and report the results of the ergonomics strategy, ensure that the performance goals have been met, and identify areas of potential improvement. These should include the following actions: a) Make the performance goals and ergonomics plan available to building users b) Provide a feedback system to collect anonymous responses and respond to them. This should be informal and ongoing. c) Maintain ongoing building user access to appropriate ergonomics METWA's, furnishings, and accessories and education. d) Conduct a survey of user satisfaction. This should be more formal than the feedback system, and occur periodically. The survey must be collected from a representative sample of building occupants making up at least 30% of the total occupants.
3. Provide machine, equipment, tools, work-aids (METWA's), furnishings, and accessories that reduce the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and are acceptable to a wide range of building users. In a setting where building users that spend 50% or more of their time at computer workstations, the following four areas must be addressed: display, computer peripherals (keyboard/mouse), work surface, and chair. Computer workstations include areas in which workers interact with screens or monitors of any kind.
4. Provide ergonomics education to building users Provide at least two opportunities for building users to understand and take advantage of ergonomic features in their environment. At least one of these opportunities must be interactive, and at least one must include an explanation of the provided METWA's and furnishings, preferably by the manufacturer. Post-education evaluations must be conducted. Education opportunities may include, but are not limited to: a) Participatory classroom sessions conducted by an ergonomics professional b) Access to literature on products and basic ergonomic knowledge relevant to the building user's tasks c) Repetitive or regularly-scheduled workstation evaluations d) Interactive internet-based products such as assessment and training tools e) Hands-on experiences, such as access to the showroom of an ergonomic furnishing supplier
Submittals:
1. Provide a narrative that speaks to the requirements listed above. It should include: - descriptions of the steps the project team has taken to identify ergonomic enhancement opportunities. - a sentence or two verifying that it is possible to exceed standard industry practices to achieve an ergonomically superior workplace. - descriptions of the performance goals and expectations, and the steps the project team has taken to meet them - descriptions of the procedures put into place to track and report the results of the ergonomics strategy. Describe how each of the required actions, listed in #5 of the requirements section, will be take place. Describe the collaboration with the management team that will carry out these procedures. - description of how purchased METWA's and furnishings will benefit the building users as they conduct routine tasks and activities, the selection criteria used for choosing the products (i.e., how the safety and health of the building user was considered), and how the products will accommodate a wide range of size needs. Size needs can typically be met by buying products that come in 'families' (small, medium, large) or are highly adjustable. - descriptions of two ergonomics education opportunities made available to building users, including the objectives and content.
2. Provide a list of purchased METWA's and furnishings that minimize the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Include cut sheets and manufacturer information for each. For project certifying under LEED for Existing Buildings : Operations and Maintenance, at least one survey must be conducted during the performance period, and documented survey results and corrective actions to address issues identified through the surveys must also be provided.
Potential Technologies and Strategies: In general, consider METWA's and furnishings that will: - reduce awkward, non-neutral work postures (e.g. neck, shoulders, hands-wrist, low back, elbows, lower extremities) - reduce duration of sustained/static work postures (e.g. leaning forward, elevated arms, continuous grip) - reduce grip and pinch forces associated with required tasks (e.g. correct tools) - reduce the repetition and duration of tasks, especially those with non-neutral postures and/or higher forces - reduce contact stress - resting soft tissues of the body on hard or sharp surfaces. To address the four required areas for building users that spend 50% or more of their time at computer workstations, consider the following strategies: Display adjustability - The display centered directly in front of the body. - The top of the display screen placed no higher than the eyes. - The ability to place the display screen 18 to 36 inches from the eyes - Control over the tilt angle of the screen and its' position on the work surface - The capability to position the display low enough to accommodate individuals with bifocals or progressive addition lenses (PALs). This may be significantly lower than eye height reduced glare - The use of technologies such as flat-screen or anti-glare devices - The display positioned such that light sources will not create glare Peripherals - Paper documents placed on a document holder immediately to the left, right or below the display - The keyboard positioned so the home row (row with F and J keys) is no higher than the elbow - The ability to adjust the keyboard angle and set the slope of the keys flat, if so desired - Enough room for the mouse or pointing device to be used adjacent to the keyboard (left, right or in front). If a separate adjustable keyboard support is used it must have space specifically designed for using a mouse or pointing device; preferably the mouse pad should have the capability to be positioned flat if the keyboard is tilted - The arm used to control the pointing device supported, either on the work surface or armrest of the chair - Ergonomically correct keyboards, mouse, phones and other supporting peripherals purchased when possible Surface - Enough work surface to properly support the computer and peripherals. Provide a surface with minimum dimensions of 28 inches wide by 24 inches deep - Enough clear space under the surface to allow the legs and feet to be positioned in multiple postures - Furnishings in multi-occupant workstations that allow the user to control surface and support heights, with surface height initially at proper seated elbow height. If workstations are single-occupant it is acceptable for facilities management to adjust the heights of surfaces Chair - Range of chair types or chair features that optimize employee fit and task requirements. - Chairs with a wide range of adjustibility For building users that work in an industrial setting, consider: - Height adjustable work-surfaces (e.g. desks, work benches, fume hoods) - Pneumatic vs. electric vs. manual tools, material handling aids, such as lifts, height adjustable pallet jacks and hand trucks. - Range of hand and power tools sizes and weights that improve employee fit and function while reducing ergonomic risk factors, for example: grip diameter, multi-finger activation and vibration isolation For ergonomics education provided to building users, consider including information on: - The possible causes of musculoskeletal discomfort - Changing the workstation or work habits if discomfort is experienced during or after work - Benefits of taking work breaks either through altering tasks performed or leaving their workstation - Benefits of resting the eyes every 20 minutes - How to properly position and adjust display height and angle, keyboard height and angle, mouse location, use of task light and chair adjustments - Acceptable postures for the head, neck, shoulders, upper arms, wrists, back, legs and feet - Benefits of regularly changing posture either through adjusting the furnishings or altering the tasks performed - How to manage glare on the computer screen - A point of contact if discomfort becomes frequent (multiple times per week)
References: Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/ergonomics/index.html, Human Factors and Ergonomic Society http://www.hfes.org, Canadian Standards Association http://www.csa.ca, The Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturer's Association http://www.bifma.org/, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists http://www.acgih.org/, International Organization for Standardization www.iso.org please reference the ISO 9241 standard, The Hewlett Packard Safety and Comfort Guide http://www.hp.com/ergo/ HealthyComputing.com, http://www.healthycomputing.com/office/setup/, 'Effect of Office Ergonomics Intervention on Reducing Musculoskeletal Symptoms ' Amick B., Robertson, M., Derango, K., Bazzani, L., Moore, A., Rooney, T., Harrist, R., , Spine 2003, 23: 24, pp 2706-2711. This study demonstrates that an office ergonomics intervention can reduce a workers perceived level of pain and increase their productivity. 'A Prospective Study of Computer Users: II. Postural Risk Factors for Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Disorders' Marcus, M., Gerr, F., Monteilh, C., Ortiz, D., Gentry, E., Cohen, S., Edwards, A., Ensor, C., Kleinbaum, D., , American Journal of Industrial Medicine 2002, 41: pp 236-249 This landmark study reports on the body postures and work practices that increase or decrease the odds of computer users experiencing musculoskeletal discomfort and disorders.
Definitions: METWA : machine, equipment, tools, work-aids.
**Update October 1, 2013: There are only four required components, the text previously mentioned five. Applicable credits were also updated.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/3/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Innovation & Design Process: Exemplary Performance in Materials & Resources - Planning Chassis Intent Extend the life cycle of existing building materials, finishes, and furniture, conserve resources, reduce waste, and reduce environmental impacts of interior construction and renovation as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport. Requirements To receive an innovation point, the project team will demonstrate that a comprehensive planning chassis design is in place with clear performance goals, including: 1. A statement of purpose describing what the planning chassis design is trying to achieve from a health and environmental standpoint, focusing on reduced material consumption, waste, time, and cost related to "churn". 2. Retention of interior non-structural components, including furniture, through various phases of projected renovation, re-configuration, and churn. 3. A clear set of acceptable performance metrics by which to measure progress or achievement, including plans illustrating extreme variety in terms of configuration, density, function, and work style without the demolition of walls or significant modification of the architecture or finishes. 4. Documentation demonstrating that the planning chassis design results in improved environmental impact, and meets the criteria set forth in #2 above. Submittals 1. Current floor plan showing architectural and furniture elements (standard planning module) that will remain constant, even as the workplace evolves. 2. Projected variations on current floor plan, showing what impacts (demolition, construction, waste, inventory) would be required to achieve each variation. 3. Calculations (similar to MR 1.2 and 1.3) illustrating that each variation would result in compliance with guidelines. Design Approach Based on the program requirements of diverse lines of business within Bank of America, and the projected rate and nature of change within those lines of business, the design team proposed an interior infrastructure, or chassis, that will remain constant from floor to floor, among various lines of business, over time and with an inherent flexibility that allows each line of business to absorb the impact of change and to meet new demands through streamlined modifications. This infrastructure consists of a zoned space plan, modularity of all products, systems and materials, moveable walls, limited hard construction, and a systems and loose furniture "kit of parts". Much like an automobile chassis, the proposed planning concept meets diverse programmatic and work-style requirements, while allowing evolving future work environments to occur with speed and at a minimum cost over a long life cycle. The intent, in addition to meeting the above aesthetic and change management goals, is designed to meet environmental impact objectives, through reduced demolition and construction related to "churn". This strategy is comprehensive in that it will be implemented on all 23 associate floors being renovated in the Bank of America Corporate Center. We request a ruling on whether implementation of this design would achieve an Innovation & Design credit.

Ruling:

The applicant is proposing an innovation and design process credit for strategic architectural and furniture product choices and future scenarios planning which will maximize adaptability over time and minimize waste caused by heavy churn rates; an interior infrastructure that will remain constant over 23 floors, among various lines of business, and over time for the project. This infrastructure consists of a zoned space plan, modularity of all products, systems and materials, moveable walls, limited hard construction, and a systems and loose furniture "kit of parts". While this strategic space planning has clear advantages, it is simply good facilities management practice for a tenant such as this where "churn" is inevitable. The proposed strategy does not warrant the award of an innovation credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
8/13/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This project involves the construction of a land mark addition to one of the world\'s premier art museums. As such a world famous architect based out of Paris, France was contracted to design the 260,000 square foot addition. We would like to propose an innovation in design credit based on electronic transmission of submittal review packages with the assumption that we will be saving sending hardcopies back and forth to Europe. Would the following be considered for an innovation credit? Credit Intent: Reduce the project\'s carbon footprint Credit Requirements: 1. Document the total number of submittal packages reviewed by the architect. For the purposes of the calculations, we will assume a standard submittal package size of 10 pages of 11x17 paper, and five copies of each submittal 2. Based on the above assumption, calculate a total weight of submittal packages that would have been sent to Europe. 3. Provide evidence of the weight capacity and fuel use of a standard aircraft used to ship packages to Europe. 4. Indicate the total savings of harmful emissions from NOT shipping hard copies of the submittal packages. As a side note, the use of electronic transmission not only reduces the project\'s carbon footprint, but has the added benefit of faster review of the submittals, likely reducing the overall time of construction.

Ruling:

While the practice of electronic transmission of submittal review packages is laudable, it does not warrant an innovation credit. The electronic transmission of submittal review packages is not only becoming common practice, but it is a relatively small part of the larger impacts of an international team, e.g. travel, other shipping, etc. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent To utilize a comprehensive Sustainability Plan for a televised event that extends LEED guidelines from building to an annual event. Proposed Requirements Develop and implement a Sustainability Plan that reduces consumption, increases recycling and reuse, offsets fossil fuel energy use and implements Green Education. Provide resource use and disposal baseline quantities and track improvements. Submittal to demonstrate compliance a) Provide resource consumption baselines for a timeline that includes pre-event preparation and the event itself. b) Provide quantifiable improvements for the event using the same timeline as the baseline. Summary of project design approaches The Live Television Production is a temporary facility for an annual single evening event lasting 10 days. - SITES - Transportation: all participants (presenters and production staff) were provided with GM flex fuel and hybrid vehicles. - WATER Conservation: All urinals are waterless at the venue saving 7 million gallons per year. Lavatory sensors are provided for premium seating restrooms - ENERGY: 10% energy reduction with an incremental decrease of 1% per year for 10 year commitment: Production lighting is designed to reduce electrical usage. 2 million kilowatt-hours of Green Power was provided that met three times the electricity needs of the award broadcast 666,000 kwh were used for the broadcast. - MATERIAL: Reuse: 100 % of all building material on the production set is donated to non profit foundations and memorabilia. - MATERIAL: Recycled content - All paper products had recycled content - Invitations, Posters and Programs are printed on Endeavour Recycled Paper, which is 30% post consumer waste, 50% recycled and is Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. (1 LEED point for 50% FSC ) - Souvenir Telecast and awards celebration. Tickets are printed on stock that is 40% post-consumer waste and 60% recycled. - Tissue products 100% recyclable post-consumer napkins were used for five (5) full days of crew meals and craft services. vi) MATERIAL - Waste: 35% of waste is diverted from landfills by weight - Event generated 1,029 tons of trash, diverted 360 tons from landfill - Event is in compliance with assembly bill 2176 AB-2176. vii) IEQ -- Green Housekeeping: Venue uses two cleaning products that are green seal certified "Hillyard Chemicals. viii) Green Education - The promotion of all the "green" attributes of the event . Naras to confirm if the greening was indicated on any of the print material used for the event - Raise awareness of the availability and benefits of Green Power in Los Angeles and beyond. Green Volunteer Team responsible for placing recycling containers in key staff and public facing areas and educating people on what goes in the bins. In addition to managing the recycling stations, each volunteer had a document on hand to speak to the other aspects of the events that were green. ix) FOOD - Water sponsored by PRIMO, whose bottles are made from American grown corn oil, not petroleum - The 100% of food packaging is nature based and environmentally sustainable - 100% Sustainable Food for crew & parties - Regional, Organic, humane and environmentally-friendly food and food practices, including seafood, dairy, and produce - 100% Reusable service materials and accessories. Reusable service materials such as ceramic plates, glass tumblers and silverware included at crew meals and craft services. - Food Waste -- 100% food waste from the event was sorted, compacted and managed by New Market Waste Solutions for donation and composting. - Food Donation. Venue Concessionaire Partner donates edible left over food to the Angel Donation program at a local mission. Un-used food from the after-party (& crews) donated to local organization to feed the homeless in local shelters.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting confirmation on whether an innovation credit may be awarded based on sustainable practices relating to an annual event. Innovation credits are reserved for green building strategies that demonstrate innovative performance in green building that are not specifically addressed elsewhere in the rating system and/or demonstrate exceptional performance beyond existing credit requirements. While it is laudable that environmentally preferable practices be implemented for events, it does not appear that the proposed credit is related to green building practices and is therefore not eligible for an innovation credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/15/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are seeking an Innovation in Design credit for implementing a comprehensive water filtration system that will reduce occupants\' exposure to contaminants generally present in tap water. In the same way that Indoor Environmental Quality credits address the reduction of airborne contaminants found in building interiors, this system addresses waterborne contaminants that are commonly found in local water supplies. This system also obviates the need for occupants to purchase bottled water products, which can help reduce the over 60 million plastic bottles that are discarded everyday in the United States. The system we are considering combines an extremely water-efficient building-wide first stage water filter that removes 100% of particulates 10 microns or larger and approximately 50% of particulates smaller than 10 microns, with a secondary stage consisting of individual "point-of-use" filters in the apartment kitchens. The point-of-use filters use a multi-stage filtration system that includes pulverized activated carbon which significantly reduces organic chemicals and a membrane that removes particulates 0.5 micron and larger. By preventing particles larger than 10 microns from ever reaching the .5 micron kitchen filters, the primary filtration system significantly extends the effective life of the secondary filters (approximately a 300% increase in filtration cartridge longevity), thus reducing maintenance and ensuring a higher flow rate and quality of water. The secondary system has been tested and certified by NSF/ANSI to reduce VOCs and trihalomethanes (THMs) which the EPA classifies as a "probable human carcinogen," by 99.86 percent. Trihalomethanes are the byproduct of municipality-introduced chlorine interacting with organic material in the source water. It also has been shown to reduce cysts, such as Cryptosporidium, by 99.99 percent. A 1993 Milwaukee outbreak of Cryptosporidium left 400,000 ill and 70 dead. This is likely to become more important since water borne disease is seen as a probable consequence of the increasing hydrologic events and flooding caused by climate change. The following list of contaminant reductions has been certified by NSF/ANSI (42 & 53): - Chlorine: Avg. Reduction-96.8% - Volatile Organic Chemicals, including Trihalomethanes (THMs): Avg. Reduction-99.86% -Asbestos fibers >10 micrometers in length: Avg. Reduction-99.86% -Cysts: Avg. Reduction-99.99% -Chloroform (VOC surrogate chemical): 98.6% This combined filtration system improves occupant health and reduces the amount of resources typically required to achieve this level of water purity. Therefore, it should be eligible for an innovation point. Suggested Credit Title: Comprehensive Drinking Water Filtration Intent: Reduce the exposure to potentially harmful waterborne contaminants. Requirements: Provide building-wide water filtration that removes particulate contamination equal to or smaller than 10 microns AND Provide point-of-use water filtration that is NSF/ANSI tested to reduce Chlorine, VOCs, Asbestos fibers, Cysts and Chloroform by at least 95%.

Ruling:

While the potential health benefits of a water filtration system are laudable, water filtration systems are relatively common, and there is no precedent for rewarding ID for such a measure. It is possible that an ID credit could be earned for the reduction of waste/transportation impact/etc. due to the use of filtered water rather than individually purchased water or company purchased water cooler service. The applicant would have to submit defensible calculations demonstrating the quantities of waste and/or pollution averted through point-of-use water filtering, and provide a description of programs or policies that encourage facility users to take advantage of the filtered water rather than purchasing bottled water. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/23/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Low-Cost HVAC For Green Buildings According to the R.S. Means Square Foot Costs, 25th Edition, the HVAC cost for a single-story office building 7,000 to 20,000 square feet in size will be $13 to $17 per square foot. This cost range is for a typical HVAC system that meets minimum building code requirements, but can not meet ASHRAE Standards 62 or 55. Our intent was to provide an HVAC system that met ASHRAE Standards 62 and 55 and used less energy while costing at least 20% less than a standard system. Our design approach combined air-to-air energy recovery with furnace/air conditioning units. The air-to-air energy recovery units deliver 1,648 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of outdoor air at constant volume or 38 cfm for each building occupant. This ventilation rate is almost twice the rate required by ASHRAE Standard 62. In addition, the air-to-air energy recovery units allow moisture transfer between the exhaust and outdoor air streams, helping to meet ASHRAE Standard 55 for comfort all year long. The total cost of the HVAC system is just $99,120 or $8.30 per square foot which includes all overhead and profit. This cost is 35% less than the lowest figure published by R.S. Means. Furthermore, the system uses 30% less cooling energy and 10% less heating energy than a system that just complies with ASHRAE Standard 90, and the system uses non-chlorinated refrigerant. This system is green and very cost effective.

Ruling:

Your proposal is not sufficient for an innovation credit. However, the system contributes towards the achievement of various other LEED prerequisites and credits. The ventilation rates and thermal comfort criteria relates to EQp1 Minimum IAQ Performance, EQc1 Carbon Dioxide Monitoring, EQc2 Ventilation Effectiveness, and EQc7 Thermal Comfort. The efficiency of the air-to-air heat exchanger can be accounted for under EAc1 Optimized Energy Performance. With all verifiable environmental benefits of the proposed system accounted for in the existing credits of the Rating System, the cost savings of the system itself does not demonstrate additional environmental benefit, and would therefore not qualify for an innovation credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/5/2004
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Clerestory to bring natural light into subterranean space: exceptional IEQ Our project is a 250,000SF subterranean sports facility. Due to the site and security constraints, we are unable to incorporate windows in the space. However, the design team feels strongly about the importance of natural light, especially in a sports facility, where users are exercising and relaxing. Therefore, in the design, we introduce 4 clerestories, designed with internal reflectors, along the sports facility to bring in natural light. As a result, the daylight factors of the major interior spaces are as follows: Natatorium: 7% Indoor track: 29% Indoor basketball court: 14% This is remarkable results for an underground facility. the clerestories also serves as fresh air intakes for the mechanical systems, therefore reducing the need of constructing a separate aerial way. We strongly believe that this will be qualified for an Innovation and Design Credit.

Ruling:

The incorporation of daylight is a strategy which is addressed in EQc8 and is a design option in most building types, including underground facilities. It appears that the design strategy outlined will meet the criteria for EQc8.1 for natural light in 75% of regularly occupied spaces and does not warrant a separate credit for innovation. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/30/2001
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Innovation Question, Breaking Down Barriers to Mass Transit:The Block 225 project is part of a 5 building campus for the State of California. A portion of the response to the neighborhood in the EIR was that the State would contribute funds to the improvement of the local park, Fremont Park, for renovation and restoration. The funds are to be used for a specific function, that of restoring historic diagonal pedestrian links across the park. The benefit to the entire project, including Block 225, is that the contribution will be used to restore a connection from the project to the light rail system, thereby encouraging the use of mass transit. Without these links, a barrier to mass transit would exist.Question: Could this response to neighborhood concerns regarding open space and mass transit be considered an innovation credit?

Ruling:

It is possible to allocate portions of a campus project to its subservient buildings on a square foot basis. The two performance measures mentioned however are already part of the LEED Rating System, and would not constitute innovation, which can generally be taken to mean new and previously unthought of ideas. Use the open space features allocated on a square foot basis towards Credit SSc5.2 Site Preservation, Maximize Open Space, and apply for the Alternative Transportation Credit, Public Transportation Access.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/24/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We propose that a LEED Innovation & Design Process (IDP) point be awarded to any project that combines the two transportation strategies of public transportation and third party car sharing from a company like WeCar by Enterprise (http://www.wecar.com/) or an equivalent program. By providing the car sharing program MORE employees can utilize public transportation because employees will be less tempted to drive their own cars to work for out of office meetings/business that may not be accessible by public transportation and will also reduce parking demand in the vicinity of the tenant space. The tenant owner would pay for a monthly public transportation pass (or equivalent) to employees and also offer a third party car sharing program in which cars are strategically placed around the city; accessed electronically by participants; booked online; available 24 hours a day seven days a week and utilize hybrid cars. Below is an outline of the potential Innovation Credit. Intent: Reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use. Promote use of public transportation and car sharing. Proposed requirements for compliance: Tenant to promote use of public transportation by offering to employees a stipend to cover the cost of a monthly public transportation pass cost or equivalent. AND Offer a third party car sharing program to employees for business related travel. The car sharing program will utilize fuel efficient hybrid automobiles and demonstrate that there will be enough cars available in the area to supplement the need from the tenant space. Proposed submittals to demonstrate compliance: Car sharing lease agreement, area plan showing location of cars realtive to tenant space, and signed letter from owner stating that they will provide a stipend for employees to purchase a monthly public transportation pass or equivalent. Technologies and Strategies: Perform a transportation survey of potential tenant occupants to identify transportation needs. Choose a building near mass transit and located near a car sharing program. Considerations: Offering to pay for staff members public transportation cost will help promote use of public transportation and reduce carbon emissions. Car sharing is becoming a popular way to pool transportation resources and have access to an automobile without owning one.

Ruling:

The project team is inquiring as to whether providing transit passes and access to a car sharing service warrant an ID credit. If these actions are part of a Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan, similar to that outlined in LEED-NC v2.1, IDc1.1 CIR Ruling dated 5/9/2003, then credit achievement would be anticipated. In addition to meeting the requirements of the referenced CIR, two of the three SSc3 Credits must be awarded for CI projects. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
12/19/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We recognize that ID credits cannot be granted achievement via the CIR process, but request the review of this proposed approach for viability to support a project earning an ID credit by meeting these requirements. Please provide insight as to the type & level of documentation required to pursue such an ID credit. Title Use of new facility to promote enhanced waste recycling programs significantly beyond the LEED criteria Credit Intent The promotion of waste recycling programs beyond the requirements required by LEED. The new facility will allow expanded programs of recycling to be practiced at the facility. The company has implemented innovative donation and recycling programs to address the recycling of wastes generated by it\'s manufacturing operations. The new facility will provide the waste storage and processing capability to extend and improve these programs. Credit Requirements To extend the size of the facility to incorporate improved waste management facilities and provide expansion space for new recycling projects. Project Approach The operation of the current waste recycling programs is limited by the storage and processing facilities of the existing facility. Construction of the new facility will be used to enhance the existing programs and provide factory space to investigate new programs Programs Waste to Energy Project - conversion of previously land-filled carpet scrap into energy to fire Cement kilns Waste Yarn Donation Program - Donation of waste yarn to charitable organizations in North East Thailand to convert into Hammocks. Example: The yarn donation program has helped to develop economical income for those who previously were limited. On average the production of 2 hammocks per day earns approximately 200$ or 4,000 - 5,000 Baht per month per family. There are approximately 500 people involved in this program now. Waste Tile Donation - Slight seconds donations to charitable organizations; Temples, Schools etc. Cardboard Cone recycling - Reclaim and sale to supplier. Comprehensive documentation / metric results are available for all of these programs.

Ruling:

Adding square footage in the building is not enough by itself to warrant an innovation credit, and the proposed credit requirement language is unacceptably vague. However, the proposed activities may be still be eligible. To achieve an innovation credit, the LEED submittal must clearly demonstrate quantifiable exemplary performance. The NCv2.1 IDc1.1 ruling dated 9/6/05 provides a compliance path for you. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
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Requirements

Credit can be achieved through any combination of the Innovation in design and Exemplary performance paths as described below:

Path 1. Innovation in design (1-5 points)
Achieve significant, measurable environmental performance using a strategy not addressed in the LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors Rating System. One point is awarded for each innovation achieved. No more than 5 points under IDc1 may be earned through Path 1—Innovation in design. Identify the following in writing:
  • The intent of the proposed innovation credit.
  • The proposed requirement for compliance.
  • The proposed submittals to demonstrate compliance.
  • The design approach (strategies) used to meet the requirements.
Path 2. Exemplary performance (1-3 points)
Achieve exemplary performance in an existing LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors prerequisite or credit that allows exemplary performance as specified in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Interior Design, 2009 Edition. An exemplary performance point may be earned for achieving double the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold of an existing credit in LEED. One point is awarded for each exemplary performance achieved. No more than 3 points under IDc1 may be earned through Path 2—Exemplary performance.
Path 3. Pilot credit (1-5 points)
Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library at www.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant and complete the required documentation. Projects may pursue up to 5 pilot credits total.
Credit substitution available
You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.

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4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Below the text of the "PATH 2" section text, insert the following section:Path 3. Pilot Credit (1 point)Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library atwww.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant andcomplete the required documentation. Projects may pursue more than 1pilot credit; however, a maximum of 1 point will be awarded.(Please note that this section was updated on Februrary 2, 2011).
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the header, change "(1 point)" to "(1 - 5 Points)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Below the text of the "PATH 2" section text, insert the following section:Path 3. Pilot Credit (1 point)Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library atwww.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant andcomplete the required documentation. Projects may pursue more than 1pilot credit; however, a maximum of 1 point will be awarded.(Please note that this section was updated on Februrary 2, 2011).
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the header, change "(1 point)" to "(1 - 5 Points)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Replace the last sentence of the paragraph with "Projects may pursue up to 5 Pilot Credits total."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the last sentence of the paragraph with "Projects may pursue up to 5 Pilot Credits total."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/7/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The IT department proposes moving the current server network to a virtual server network. The move would produce immediate benefits to both the IT department and Harris construction as a whole. Virtualization is a proven software technology that is rapidly transforming the IT landscape and fundamentally changing the way that people compute. Today\'s powerful x86 computer hardware was originally designed to run only a single operating system and a single application, but virtualization breaks that bond, making it possible to run multiple operating systems and multiple applications on the same computer at the same time, increasing the utilization and flexibility of hardware. In essence, virtualization lets us transform hardware into software. The use of software such as VMware ESX will allow us to transform or "virtualize" the hardware resources of an x86-based computer-including the CPU, RAM, hard disk and network controller-to create a fully functional virtual machine that can run its own operating system and applications just like a "real" computer. Multiple virtual machines share hardware resources without interfering with each other so that you can safely run several operating systems and applications at the same time on a single computer. Power Consumption Energy consumption is a critical issue for Harris IT today, whether the goal is to reduce cost, save the environment or keep our datacenter running. In the United States alone, datacenters consumed $4.5 billion worth of electricity in 2006. Industry analyst Gartner1 estimates that over the next 5 years, most enterprise data centers will spend as much on energy (power and cooling) as they do on hardware infrastructure. Virtualization allows us to reduce our energy costs and consumption by 80%. Most servers and desktops today are in use only 8-15% of the time they are powered on, yet most hardware consumes 60-90% of the normal workload power even when idle. VMware virtualization has advanced resource and memory management features that enable consolidation ratios of 15:1 or more which increase hardware utilization to as much as 85%. Once virtualized, a new feature of VMware Distributed Resource Scheduler (DRS) called Distributed Power Management (DPM) monitors utilization across the datacenter and intelligently powers off unneeded physical servers without impacting applications and users. With VMware virtualization we can dramatically reduce energy consumption without sacrificing reliability or service levels. Reduce the Environmental Impact of IT For Harris this equates to every server virtualized, we can save about 7,000 kilowatt hours, or four tons of CO2 emissions, every year. This means our 12 servers could be reduced to 4 servers through virtualization. The reduction in servers along with the savings in electricity with the reduced cooling requirements equate to as savings of 49,000 kilowatt hours, or 28 tons of CO2 emissions every year. Currently 60 cents of every dollar spent for data center energy is used for cooling equipment and not powering it. Conclusion In short the five major reasons to virtualize the Harris IT servers are: Server Consolidation and Infrastructure Optimization: Virtualization makes it possible to achieve significantly higher resource utilization by pooling common infrastructure resources and breaking the legacy "one application to one server" model. Physical Infrastructure Cost Reduction: With virtualization, we can reduce the number of servers and related IT hardware in the data center. This leads to reductions in real estate, power and cooling requirements, resulting in significantly lower IT costs. Improved Operational Flexibility & Responsiveness: Virtualization offers a new way of managing IT infrastructure and can help IT administrators spend less time on repetitive tasks such as provisioning, configuration, monitoring and maintenance. Increased Application Availability & Improved Business Continuity: Eliminate planned downtime and recover quickly from unplanned outages with the ability to securely backup and migrate entire virtual environments with no interruption in service. Improved Desktop Manageability & Security: Deploy, manage and monitor secure desktop environments that end users can access locally or remotely, with or without a network connection, on almost any standard desktop, laptop or tablet PC. Virtualization is a technology that can benefit Harris Construction. The employment of virtualization solutions will reduce IT costs while increasing the efficiency, utilization and flexibility of their existing computer hardware.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting confirmation that the implementation of virtualization in data centers may be considered for an innovation in design credit. Virtualization is a software technology that allows servers to run multiple operating systems on one server at a time. The strategies outlined in the request primarily focus on increased resource utilization, increased operational and application flexibility, and improving manageability and security, among other things. Other savings are just a by-product of the technology. This is not eligible for innovation in design credit. A similar CIR has been posted related to data transfer media dated 9/30/2008, under NCv2.1. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

DESCRIPTION Proposed achievement of this credit involves production of a fifteen minute video overview of the resort\'s LEED and green features. INTENT Previous rulings have indicated a minimum of two of the following solutions were required to achieve a point for public education within the Innovation and Design category: - Comprehensive signage program - Development of a manual, guideline, or case study - Educational outreach program or guided tour It is the intent of this CIR to seek a ruling that would permit the use of digital media (i.e., video) to serve, as an alternate path to all of the above. REQUIREMENTS Utilize digital media to expand upon the delivery of public education through: - Providing context to the LEED plaque (to be located in the lobby) by playing back the video on a flat screen adjacent to the plaque. This will provide expansive meaning to a plaque that will be viewed by thousands of people each year - including many who are not familiar with USGBC or LEED. Additionally, this would also reduce the traditional use of lobby paper products to tell the green story. Such paper products can sometimes go underutilized and/or are quickly discarded. - Educating visitors on the LEED and non-LEED green attributes of the resort by the daily and multiple playbacks (minimum 4 times each day) of the video on the resort\'s dedicated in-room television channel. This would achieve USGBC\'s goal of educating visitors to the project. - Educating new employees by playback of the video as part of their initial training and orientation. This would achieve USGBC\'s goal of educating employees. - Reaching a larger audience beyond those traveling to the resort by featuring the video on the resort\'s website and the corporation\'s environmental initiatives website. In essence the video provides a virtual, as opposed to physical guided tour, of the project without expanding facilities unnecessarily in order to conduct tours of the back of house physical plant. This would complement USGBC\'s goal of sharing the successes of this project with others who may not have the opportunity to visit the project. SUBMITTALS LEED Design Application Milestone: - Proposed location of lobby LEED plaque and adjacent flat screen - Story treatment/synopsis LEED Construction Application Milestone submittals would include: - Shooting script - Shooting schedule - Schedule of daily playback on the in-room resort channel - Web address/proposed design for the resort and environmental affairs websites that would host the video.

Ruling:

The proposed innovation credit is based on using digital media, in the form of a video, which will provide information about the green features of the building. While commendable, this approach alone does not substantiate a comprehensive green education program to warrant achievement of an innovation credit. An additional strategy should be adopted, and must be actively instructional, such as an educational outreach program or guided tour, or a comprehensive signage program built into the building\'s respective spaces. Please refer to the established requirements for this as noted in the LEED-NC v2.1 CIR ruling dated 09/24/2001. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/3/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Design for Increased Physical Activity Credit Intent: The obesity epidemic is a major health crisis facing the American public, leading to the increased incidence of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease among other ailments. Increased physical activity, as little as two minutes of stair climbing each day, could significantly reduce the rate of obesity in the country. Extensive studies by the Center for Disease Control and other independent researchers* have shown that there are four major elements of building design which encourage greater physical activity: A) Stairs - Signage prompts encouraging the use of the stairs. - Improved stairwell aesthetics through use of color, artwork, music, etc. - Favored central locations for stairwells. B) Access to exercise facilities - Weekly exercise classes - On-site walking trails - Gym or exercise room C) Improved streetscapes - Sidewalks/traffic safety - Comfort lighting - Aesthetic landscaping D) Community location - Urban density - Mixed use - Connectivity of pathways to destinations *Full text of these reports is available via email as files cannot be posted with CIRs. Credit Requirements As LEED already accounts for the items listed in C & D, we propose that the ID credit be earned through meeting 4 of the 6 items listed in A & B. Submittal A LEED-Online letter template including the project compliance narrative and floor plans highlighting the design elements included. Project Approach The Riverside Health Center is a partial renovation and addition project that will provide the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene with a contemporary facility to serve their Health Academy, Nutrition, Primary Care Clinic, STD Clinic, Family Daycare, and School Health programs. The building design will include a centrally located stair, signage prompts containing info on the benefits of taking the stairs. The stairwell itself has been enlarged to encourage greater use, will feature added ventilation, operable windows, and is to be included as a site for expressing the project\'s 1% for the arts. The 1% for arts is a city funded program that matches 1% of a project\'s construction budget towards a public art project. In addition to fulfilling all three stairwell improvements, the building features an exercise room, will offer weekly yoga classes, and includes an on-site community garden with landscaped pathways to encourage outdoor exercise.

Ruling:

Along with statistical data, additions to your approach could earn you an innovation credit. Currently, while the overall intent is laudable, it is unlikely that the proposal described above would earn an innovation credit. To earn an innovation credit, project teams must demonstrate innovative performance in Green Building categories not specifically addressed by the rating system. An example to enhance the approach might include design of the site to ensure that there are sidewalks of some minimum width to promote walking. These innovations need to be comprehensive in nature and have significant, measurable environmental benefits. This proposal focuses on fitness, health, and lifestyle related issues that are generally considered outside the scope of the LEED Rating system; LEED does promote productivity and overall wellness of building occupants. In addition, as written, it is unclear how the project team would demonstrate quantitative performance improvements for environmental benefit (establishing a baseline of standard performance for comparison to the final design). Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/29/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Activated Carbon Filters for Low-Cost Demand Control Ventilation and Energy Efficiency This CIR proposes an innovation design credit for a suite of design features and a design procedure that will reduce the cost of demand controlled ventilation (DCV). The procedure is based on a combination of: scrubbing the air with activated charcoal (AC) filters to reduce the number of critical rooms in a building that will require CO2 sensors; using air-to-air heat recovery for the building air: using time-of--day control of ventilation for the building zones. The proposed design procedure will enable selecting the minimum number of CO2 sensors to control the amount of delivered outside air. This will reduce the initial cost as well as the annual cost of maintaining their calibration. The new Pacific Garden Mission building in Chicago will house an average of 800 homeless people on any given night. The design calls for using activated carbon filters in the main air handling unit for the entire building to help control the peculiarly strong body odors of the guests and to reduce the required outside air and associated energy use. Three "hot boxes" will also be used to disinfect by 180oF+ heat all the clothes of the incoming guests as part of the thorough laundry process. The activated carbon filters are capable of reducing these outdoor air rates by over 70%. This was determined by applying the Indoor Air Quality procedure described in Section 6.2 of ASHRAE Standard 62-1999 Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality1 To be conservative, we will assume that only a 50% reduction in outside air will be feasible because additional outdoor air may be necessary to control body odors by dilution. Besides reducing the cost of conditioning the ventilation air an additional benefit of the activated carbon filters will be to help reduce the number of CO2 sensors needed in the building for effective and affordable demand control ventilation. By reducing the required outside air by 50% the number of "critical rooms" is reduced. We define "critical rooms" as the rooms having a required minimum fraction of outside air, say 0.50, as calculated using the Ventilation Rate Procedure for multiple spaces and the Indoor Air Quality Procedure in ASHRAE 62,2-20012. The rationale for not installing CO2 sensors in rooms with outdoor air fractions below a specific number, say 0.50, is: 1. if regularly occupied rooms with outdoor air fractions above 0.50 are getting sufficient outside air, the rooms with lower fractions should automatically get sufficient outside air. 2. one air handling unit serves the entire PGM building. Therefore, a small number of CO2 sensors can control the outdoor air fraction throughout the building. (The air handler is equipped with multiple fans--their redundancy makes it acceptable to serve a building this size, approx. 118,580sf net interior floor area with one air handler.) 3. The design will also include air-to-air heat recovery at the main air handling unit using either run-around-coils or heat pipes. 4. For major parts of the day CO2 sensor control of the supply and outside air quantities for particular space will be overridden by direct time-of-day control by the central EMS. The building program is arranged so that during the daytime the lower two floors will be occupied and conditioned for occupancy. The upper two floors are dormitories that will be unoccupied and their environment will be kept at unoccupied settings, including just enough supply air to slightly pressurize these floors relative to the outside. Conversely during the evening hours, the lower two floors will be unoccupied and their environment will be kept at unoccupied settings with the minimal required supply air to temper the space and control building pressurization. The central EMS will be used to control the supply air to these large blocks of the building. (This will also allow using a very low diversity factor to size the main air handling unit since it will be used to condition about 1/2 of the building at any one time.) 5. The limiting factor in determining the minimum acceptable amount of outside air may very well be the perception of odors by the occupants. This may require higher amounts of outside for dilution of odors than what would be called for by the CO2 sensor. This will be determined empirically after occupancy begins. In summary, the above design features and program requirements make it possible to reduce the number of CO2 sensors at this job by at least 50%. This will be documented in the summary table of the Ventilation Rate Procedure analysis. As such, the use of activated carbon filters makes demand controlled ventilation economically viable. Our first question is whether the above package of design features and approach is acceptable for reducing the number of required CO2 sensors and the cost of DCV and whether this would be considered an Innovation in Design and suitable for receiving a a LEED credit. Our second question is whether we can calculate the energy savings due to the activated carbon filters using the same analysis method approved for demand control ventilation. The % reduction due to the DCV would be calculated by subtracting saved energy from DCV in the numerator and using the Base Case energy cost without DCV in the denominator. Our preliminary energy modeling indicates annual savings of at least $10,000 per year or about 5% of the projected energy costs of the Current Design. These savings would be included under EA Credit 1 Optimize Energy Performance. We look forward to the USGBC\'s comments on this potential innovation in design and on the savings calculation method for the activated carbon filters. 1. ASHRAE 62.2-1999 Section 6.2 and Appendix E 2. ASHRAE 62.2-1999 Section 6.1.3.1 Ventilation Procedure for Multiple Spaces

Ruling:

Based on the description provided, it does not appear that there are additional environmental benefits from this design approach that would qualify for an Innovation in Design credit, for the following reasons. LEED requires compliance with the Standard 62 using the Ventilation Rate Procedure (VRP). Reducing outdoor air rates is only allowed using the Standard\'s Indoor Air Quality Procedure. To comply with EQp1, outdoor air rates cannot be lower than those prescribed by the VRP, whether charcoal filters are used or not. Unfortunately the VRP tables do not have a category for "homeless centers." If they did, the rates would be quite high given the source strength. The closest occupancy in terms of body odor source strength is a "health club/weight room" which requires 20 cfm/p plus 0.06 cfm/ft2. In any case, the designers may have to request help from ASHRAE SSPC 62.1. Based on EQp1, the ASHRAE 62 Indoor Air Quality Procedure cannot be used to reduce ventilation rates. CO2 sensors should be used to monitor air quality; an alternative method for monitoring air quality has not been substituted outside of manual control in response to odors. EQc1 requires CO2 monitoring in densely occupied areas for air handlers serving multiple spaces with varying occupancy. As long as your design meets this requirement, then it will qualify for a point under EQc1. CO2 DCV must be customized to this application since the project requires a much higher ventilation rate compared to the activity level. The standard assumptions used in determining CO2 setpoints assume CO2 concentration tracks bio-effluent concentration and that bioeffluent/CO2 emission rate tracks activity level. This works for typical projects, but it would not be true for a homeless center. The project team may want to reconsider application of CO2/DCV for this project. Under EAc1, the ASHRAE 90.1 methodology calls for the same outdoor air rate for both the budget and proposed building. If DCV is used on this project, the energy savings can be demonstrated through the "exceptional calculation method" allowed by the standard. The energy cost savings would be included in EAc1. Strategies such as CO2 and humidity monitoring are addressed under existing credits within the LEED Rating System. Please note that another issue unrelated to Standard 62 is disease control. Homeless people are often carriers of disease (e.g. TB) and can be highly susceptible due to health conditions. In this case, the recirculation of any air in a homeless center may not be desirable. While very good particle filters (e.g. MERV 15) can remove most bacteria and droplet nuclei carrying viruses. 100% outdoor air with heat recovery may be a better solution. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/28/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Green Advantage certification

Ruling:

USGBC has assessed the Green Advantage certification program against our established requirements for recognition in LEED and found Green Advantage to be in compliance. As such, LEED project teams who comply with the following requirements are eligible for award of 1 Innovation point for LEED v4, and 2009 BD&C and LEED-NC v2.2 projects:1. Prior to and throughout the construction phase of the project, 30% of the General Contractor\'s or Construction Manager\'s personnel will be Green Advantage Certified. Personnel must be actively involved in the day-to-day activities and of the following classifications as applicable: a. Contractorb. Construction Manager including Project Executivec. Project Manager d. Project Engineer e. Quality Control Managerf. Mechanical/ Electrical/Plumbing (MEP) Coordinatorg. Superintendenth. Assistant Superintendent i. General Foreman2. Prior to and throughout the construction phase of the project, 30% of Subcontractor personnel will be Green Advantage Certified. Personnel must be actively involved in the day-to-day activities and of the following classifications: a. Project Managerb. Superintendentc. Project Engineerd. Quality Control Managere. General Foremanf. Trade Foreman(removed 4/1/2011: Architect\'s on site representative)Note that this LEED Interpretation is in line with the guidance for \'Recognition of Third Party Personnel Credentials and Certifications in LEED\', which can be found at usgbc.org and is also linked below.added 4/1/2011:Submittals:1. Provide a complete list, aggregating General Contractor\'s and Construction Manager\'s personnel, noting each person\'s role in the project and who is Green Advantage Certified. (For multiple-prime contracts, provide separate lists for the Construction Manager and each Prime Contractor.) Calculate the percentage of Green Advantage Certified personnel. 2. Provide a complete list, aggregating Subcontractors\' personnel, noting each person\'s role in the project and who is Green Advantage Certified. (For multiple-prime contracts, provide separate lists for each Prime Contractor\'s Subcontractors.) Calculate the percentage of Green Advantage Certified personnel. 3. For each Green Advantage Certified individual, provide a copy of the Green Advantage certificate. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/21/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project scope is unique in that the building owner will also be the primary tenant of building and is currently seeking certification under LEED Core & Shell for the overall base building tower, while simultaneously pursuing LEED for Commercial Interiors for the one-half portion within the building they will occupy. In this scenario it is unclear exactly how to address certain credit requirements for a Commercial Interiors project when the space will be located within a Core & Shell building concurrently pursuing the same related credits. There is a below grade parking structure is intended to serve the entire masterplan (not just our building) with 2,151 parking spaces. The total parking associated with both LEED projects is equal to 1,500 parking spaces, with 750 allocated to CS and the other 750 allocated CI. The LEED CS credit requires either preferred parking for 5%, OR refueling stations for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles for 3% based on the total parking capacity of the site. However LEED CI does not offer an equivalent credit for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles and therefore we are requesting that the calculations for this LEED CS credit to be based on the parking available only to the Core and Shell tenants of the building, or 750 spaces. Our goal is to not penalize the Core and Shell project since it is known that half of the parking is allotted to the LEED Commercial Interiors project, for which no such credit for low emitting & fuel efficient vehicles is offered. Alternatively, if we were to calculate this credit in accordance with the LEED NC v2.2 requirements it would require either 75 preferred parking spaces, or 45 stations (or a combination of the two) be incorporated into the total allocated parking. By addressing the equivalent LEED NC compliance path, would it be fair to assume that 1) the LEED CS project would earn this point, AND 2) the LEED CI project could earn a potential Innovation & Design point as well?

Ruling:

1. In order for the CS project (in its entirety) to achieve this credit, all 1,500 parking spaces dedicated to the project must be used for calculations. As the CS requirement take into consideration total vehicle parking capacity, the CI parking spaces cannot be taken out of the calculations, to determine either the number of preferred parking spaces for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles or the number of refueling stations. The requirements for these calculations are the same for LEED-CS and LEED-NC v2.2. 2. The CI project would potentially be able to earn an innovation point for the achievement of this credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/13/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This CIR is being submitted to assess whether this proposed ID credit may qualify for a point assuming that all proposed standards are met and all documentation is made. ID Credit Title: Low-Emitting Exterior Materials: Paints and Coatings Narrative Statement of Credit Intent: Reduce the quantity of air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers. Increase the demand for Low VOC materials for exterior applications. Narrative Statement Describing Credit Requirements: Paints and coating used on the exterior of the building shall comply with following standards: Architectural paints, stains and coatings. Do not exceed VOC limits set by Green Seal Standard GS-11 - Flats - 50 g/L - Non-Flats / Primers - 150g/L Anti-corrosive paints, stains, and coatings. Do not exceed VOC limits set by Green Seal Standard GS-03. - 250 g/L Clear wood finishes, floor coatings, stains, and shellacs. Do not exceed VOC limits set by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) Rule 1113 - Clear wood finishes: varnish 350 g/L; lacquer 550 g/L - Floor Coatings: 100 g/L - Sealers: waterproofing sealers 250 g/L; sanding sealers 275 g/L; all other sealers 200 g/L - Shellacs: clear 730 g/L; pigmented 550 g/L - Stains: 250 g/L Narrative Describing Project\'s Approach to the Credit: Require all exterior paint applications to meet the same standards as for interior paint applications. Exterior paint applications will include but are not limited to exterior hollow metal doors, soffits, fascias, metal roof touch-up, metal cap flashings, metal lintels, and vent grating. The coating for our metal roof will be a factory applied finish.

Ruling:

The strategy proposed for earning an Innovation in Design credit for Low-Emitting Exterior Materials: Paints and Coatings has merit. In order to achieve this credit, the approach must be comprehensive in nature and include VOC limits for concrete sealants and caulks, exterior paints, wood stains and sealers, and metal stains and sealers. Please refer to the LEED NCv2.2 IDc1.1 CIR ruling dated 10/23/2006 as well as LEED EB: Operations & Management SSc2 for further guidance on how to approach this credit in a comprehensive manner. The first item in the Materials Selection section of the LEED ID Credit Catalogue (Page 19) offers general guidance for VOC content in material selection when applying for an ID credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
3/15/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Prior to submitting the full Template and supporting documentation for this Innovation & Design Process Credit, we would like to request an evaluation to ensure we are on the right path for this credit. Our project is a mixed-use facility with residential units at 7 levels, retail at the ground level and parking below grade. We plan to integrate an Educational Outreach Program, following the guidelines as defined in IDc1.1 inquiry dated 9-20-01. The following is the Outline of our Program: I. Interpretive Signage Program A signage permanent signage program will be designed and installed to communicate the major sustainable design aspects of the project to the visitors and customers of the facility, highlighting the various sections of the LEED program - Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Materials and Resources, Energy & Atmosphere and Indoor Environmental Quality a. Retail - Signs to be located at the Paseo area between the two buildings and will highlight the sustainable design features of the project, including: 1. Water Efficiency - reduced water consumption and irrigation by captured ground water 2. Stormwater reduction and Heat Island reduction: Rooftop gardens and Green Roof - reduces Stormwater quantity, reduces heat islands at the roof and provides the residents with a gardening plot. 3. Recycled materials & low VOC materials as well as Construction waste diversion from landfills. 4. Alternative Transportation - preferred parking for HOV, secured bicycle parking for residents, adjacency to bus stops and ferry service. A signage program will be designed and installed to communicate energy and water efficiency data on a monthly basis to the residents. The intent is to encourage residents to make a concerted effort towards reducing energy and water consumption. b. Residential - Signs to be located at Residential Common Lobby Areas II. Project Manual for Sustainable Design features for the project a. Manual will include narratives and supporting graphics documenting the design approach for the 5 sections of the LEED NC v2.2 Submission b. The LEED Checklist and Templates submitted to the USGBC will be included in this Manual for reference by others. III. Educational Outreach Program a. The Home Owners Association will sponsor Educational Programs (Organic Gardening, Organic Cooking, Sustainable Living Practices, Energy Consumption Reduction) will be held at the facility in the meeting room for residents to further their awareness of sustainable living.

Ruling:

The provided description has met the precedent set forth in CIR Ruling dated 9/24/01. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/30/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

It appears that most data centers that have recently pursued LEED certification have been successful using a \'mixed use\' model, in which the data center is a component of a larger office building. Based on this model and the definition of \'Process Load\' in ASHRAE Standard 90.1-99 ("energy consumed in support of a manufacturing, industrial or commercial process other than conditioning spaces and maintaining comfort and amenities for the occupants of a building"), it is our interpretation that the energy required to power and cool the data center electronics is not included in the baseline energy calculation under the Energy & Atmosphere credit category. (Ref: CIR 4/11/2003 and Ruling 5/5/2003). This leads us to believe that an appropriate venue for credit contribution associated with data center energy reduction initiatives is in the Innovation & Design category. With the rise in bandwidth requirements, optical fiber versus copper has significant energy savings advantages. Energy savings associated with power and cooling of a 10Gbyte/s optical network vs. 10G copper network can range from 75-85% depending on port count. Further, innovative high fiber count pre-terminated optical solutions vs. traditional patch-cord solutions reduce cabling congestion and optimize air flow in the server racks and raceways further reducing cooling energy requirements. Will Innovation & Design credits be considered for the following? 1. Installed cabling infrastructure that provides improved energy efficiency over another. 2. A Pre-Terminated high fiber count optical solution vs. Patch-Cord optical solution.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting confirmation whether the installation of more efficient network components (i.e., high fiber count pre-terminated optical connections) in data centers may be considered for an innovation in design credit. Copper based data transfer media is increasingly being replaced by fiber optic lines in the data transfer industry. As such, the proposed strategies are not innovative strategies for energy savings, and are therefore not eligible to achieve an innovation in design credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/26/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The commercial office project is designed and constructed to achieve various LEED NC 2.2 credits. The project is located in Providence, Rhode Island. We are seeking an innovation in design credit (ID) for a Comprehensive Transportation plan based on the ID credit previously approved on 5/9/2003 The INTENT of this innovation credit is to provide occupants of the building additional options for Alternative Transportation and reduce the drive alone trips through the use of a Transportation Management Plan set forth by the Owner. The project is currently pursuing three SS 4 baseline credits including: a. Project is located within 1/4 mile of Bus service and directly across the street from train station. Direct route into Boston also. b. Bicycle Storage and shower facility is provided for employees. c. Preferred Parking is provided for low emitting/ fuel efficient vehicles. Please note that the project locations offers bus service beyond 2 lines [ >50 lines available from this location ]. In addition, the train station offers a direct line to the airport. The Comprehensive Transportation Plan will include the following additional elements: a. The employer is providing free bus passes to 30% of the employees [equivalent of 300 passes]. b. The Rhode Island Public Transportation Authority [RIPTA] provides a number of transportation amenities/ alternates for its residents and information on the same will be available through the employer\'s intranet. Information and amenities include: 1. Maps/ schedules/ contact info for Public Transportation 2. Information on incentives provided by RIPTA includes: a. RIPTA/Google Trip Planner b. Carpools: carpooling options c. Commuter services Submittals will include: a. Copy of RIPTA pamphlet outlining available public transportation amenities. b. Commitment letter from the employer to provide 300 public transportation passes.

Ruling:

Innovation credits are awarded during the certification process, not through the CIR process. This ruling is to provide guidance about the likely measures and documentation that would need to be included in the credit application. This CIR is being submitted based on the merits of a Transportation Management Plan that will be instituted by the administration of the building. The program is part of the owner\'s efforts to reduce drive alone trips. This inquiry has utilized IDc1.1 CIR ruling dated 5/9/2003 as a basis for its program requirements. As presented in this inquiry, the Transportation Management Plan does not meet the standards established in the referenced CIR. The CIR of 5/9/2003 presented a comprehensive TMP that included the following elements: Rideshare Matching Assistance, Subsidized Regional Transit Pass ( In lieu of providing 3% with Alternative Fuel Vehicles ), Bike Subsidy and User Groups, Amtrak Subsidy, and a Guaranteed Ride Home Program. The above noted program provides a less comprehensive package, providing only bus passes for a percentage of total employees and information on nearby mass transportation options. Additional provisions should be included, such as passes for a larger percentage of employees, rail transit subsidies and programs for carsharing, bikesharing, and vanpools. In order to meet the standards of CIR 5/9/2003 the existing program would need to be expanded. Alternatively, the project team could investigate an exemplary performance Innovation & Design credit for SSc4.1 As described, the project is in the direct vicinity of multiple mass transit options. The exemplary performance guidelines for SSc4.1 are available in the LEED v2.2 reference guide. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/27/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

AMD\'s new Austin Campus will include a "Halo Studio", a virtual meeting room that is equipped with the latest telepresence technology and is optimized for video collaboration between globally dispersed teams. AMD\'s telepresence system will utilize broadcast-quality cameras and optics to deliver seamless, no perceived delay collaboration around the world, eliminating the need for airplane and automobile travel for in-person meetings. Telepresence recreates face-to-face meetings virtually so employees and partners can build relationships, review products and documents and make decisions faster without leaving their offices. Halo users can interrupt one another, express their emotional reactions when they feel them, and otherwise, act as they would in a regular face-to-face meeting. The end result: everyone feels as if they are in the same room, when in reality, they may be thousands of miles away on different continents. By reducing employee travel, these systems minimize the greenhouse gas footprint for Halo-enabled buildings while improving worker productivity, satisfaction and health. In addition, Halo rooms use US EPA Energy Star rated plasma displays and revert to standby mode when not in use, reducing energy use by 40%. AMD\'s offices are spread around the country and around the world. "Americans make more than 405 million long-distance [over 50 miles] business trips per year, accounting for 16% of all long-distance travel" (from "America on the Go", U.S. Department of Transportation Bureau of Transportation Statistics, October 2003). Halo rooms have the potential to significantly reduce the number of long-distance trips made by business travelers and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions. Bill McGee writes in USA Today of a Consumer Reports study on carbon footprints for air travel: "We used 11 leading carbon calculators to assess our footprint using the standard measurement of pounds of CO2. For a flight from New York to Los Angeles, we found that one passenger generated anywhere from 1,924 pounds to 6,732 pounds." (from "On the Road with Bill McGee", USA Today, online: http://www.usatoday.com/travel/columnist/mcgee/2008-01-30-fuzzy-math_N.htm) These statistics indicate that a single "Halo Studio" meeting with a mix of attendees from around the country and within Austin can divert roughly 15,512 lbs. or 7.8 tons of CO2. Over the course of a year, this single "Halo Studio" could divert hundreds or even thousands of tons of CO2. (Calculation: 4 cross-country round trip plane flights= 1,924 lbs. CO2 x 2 trips x 4 attendees = 15,392 lbs. CO2; 4 short distance car trips = 15 lbs CO2 per mile x 2 trips x 4 attendees = 120 lbs. CO2; total = 15,392 + 120 = 15,512 lbs. CO2) Telepresence systems are offered by several companies including Hewlett-Packard, Cisco, Teliris and Polycom. AMD\'s Halo system was developed by Hewlett-Packard. These systems are distinct from traditional videoconferencing due to the immersive quality of communication provided by the telepresence solutions. For example, the offerings from HP utilize multiple display screens, broadcast quality cameras, a fiber optic network and include technology that enable people to connect to multiple sites around the world at the same time, offering everyone a "same-room" communication experience. There are up front investment requirements, including the cost of the studios (pricing varies depending on the type of telepresence solution, but top of the line HP studios, for example, list for $349,000 USD per studio) and some systems also have a monthly service fees. We would like to establish a precedent Innovation in Design credit that recognizes telepresence technology and significant efforts to reduce the ecological footprint of meetings in standard business practice. Is this an appropriate innovation credit?

Ruling:

The concept of virtual meetings, either via conference calls, or other technological means, has become common practice for organizations located in multiple locations. While the telepresence technology is a superior way to facilitate meetings remotely, it does not directly relate to design and construction, but addresses operational practices for a company. Innovation credits are awarded to projects for exceptional performance above the requirements set by the LEED Rating System, or innovative performance in green building categories not specifically addressed by the LEED Rating System. As the use of this technology appears to be a core part of the organization\'s normal business practice, it would not warrant an innovation credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/16/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Please advise on the viability of the following Innovation and Design Process credit: Intent The intent of this Innovation Credit is to reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of building materials and products, and increase the market demand for climate neutral products and materials. Products and materials are climate neutral when there is zero net greenhouse gases (GHG), such as CO2, from the entire life cycle of the product. The manufacturer calculates the total GHG impact utilizing life cycle analysis and then obtains carbon emission reduction credits (ERCs) such as through green power off-set purchases or carbon sequestration projects. The offsets must equal or exceed the GHG produced during extraction, processing, manufacture, transport and end use of a product, and be certified by a recognized third party using sound scientific and accounting principles. Climate neutral products must also deliver climate benefits "above and beyond" the standard version of these building materials, thus making them distinct and separable from all other sustainability features that these materials might also possess, such as recycled content. The development of market demand for climate neutral products provides several environmental benefits: Reduce the GHG impact of building materials, and thus address the embedded climate impacts inherent in a building or interior fit-up materials. Support USGBC\'s desire to move towards a more life-cycle based approach. Reward proactive suppliers who take a climate leadership position with their products. Ensure that climate benefits can be delivered on a credible, measurable and transparent basis. Support the emerging market for carbon and other GHG trading. Requirements Specify 5% of the project\'s total material value with products or materials, which are third party certified as climate neutral. Submittals Provide a spreadsheet indicating the total material value of the project, including furniture and list each climate neutral material or product, indicating its material value in dollars, manufacturer and third-party certification. Calculate the percentage content of the climate neutral products and materials in relationship to the overall project material value. For products in which a portion of the total product is certified climate neutral, the calculation is based on the percentage of the climate neutral material in relationship to the total material or product cost. The percentage of climate neutral products must be greater than or equal to 5% of the total project value. See formula below: Total climate neutral material value ($) / Total project material value ($) = Project percentage of climate neutral materials (%) Provide cut sheets or other documentation demonstrating climate neutral compliance for each product. Potential Technologies & Strategies Research and specify products and materials that are climate neutral and have third party life cycle analysis and certification, which has determined that there is no net addition of greenhouse gases CO2, from their from their extraction, processing, manufacture and end use. Establish a project goal for climate neutral products and identify suppliers that can achieve this goal. Select products, which met all other project performance criteria including other environmental benefits, such as recycled content, distance from project site to place of manufacturer and extraction, VOC content and other measurable criteria. Supporting Documentation This innovation credit recognizes that tools are becoming available to more clearly state the environmental benefits of product and materials which offer a climate neutral stance in regard to greenhouse gas impact. For the purposes of this credit climate neutral products and materials are climate neutral when there is no net addition of greenhouse gases, such as CO2, from their extraction, processing and/or manufacture, or the manufacturer has purchased carbon or other greenhouse gas offsets such as through green power purchases. The Climate Neutral Network (www.climateneutral.com) is an independent non-profit organization which certifies climate neutrality under its Climate Cool brand mark for products, materials, processes and enterprises. The process of certification is rigorous, quantitative and based on established, clearly stated and repeatable standards and principles, similar to the rigor of the Greenguard and Forest Stewardship Council, although with a difference emphasis. Based on the particular products and/or amount of material specified, manufacturers can calculate the amount of CO2 permanently retired by the specific use of a Climate Cool product or material. The achievement threshold for this proposed innovation credit is 5% of total project material cost. Given the current limited amount of climate neutral products available on the market, this threshold is significant in that to achieve this level a designer will need to seek out and consciously choose these products and materials over their non-climate neutral counterparts. This threshold is the same as the current LEED-CI threshold for rapidly renewable materials, which currently represent a similar sized share of the building material market.

Ruling:

NOTE: This CIR and ruling can apply to projects registered in other rating systems other than LEED-CI. Your innovation credit proposal for use of climate neutral products is acceptable provided that: 1. Each third-party certifier of climate neutral products is a reputable, independent entity. An example of a climate neutral product certifier is the Climate Neutral Network. Purchases from carbon offset retail programs must be of the quality explained in Appendix A, below. Any credible environmental claim certifier can utilize the path described in Appendix B to certify climate neutral products. 2. The product\'s entire line of supply and manufacture must be climate neutral. It is not sufficient that a manufacturer purchase offsets solely for the units that are purchased and installed in a specific building; the continuous process that enables a specific product\'s availability to the market must be climate neutral. Minor variables such as color choices do not constitute a separate product. As already stated in your proposal, the full lifecycle of the products needs to be addressed and the products must also deliver climate benefits "above and beyond" the standard version of these building materials, making them distinct and separable from other sustainability features that these materials might also possess, such as recycled content. To demonstrate a product\'s climate neutral status, include in your submittals the certifier\'s verification of climate neutral product status with a summary of the carbon footprint formulation and means used to achieve climate neutral status. Include a copy of the inventory summary used by the USEPA Climate Leaders program. USGBC recognizes that this is a rapidly evolving field and so this ruling may not have long standing as a precedent for other requests. The ruling will be revised as the standards of quality and certification advance. ----------------------------- APPENDIX A There must be a 100% offset of Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions.* The following is acceptable for Scope 1 and 3 emissions*: Emission reduction ("ERs") offsets must be generated from acceptable project categories which must be independently verified by a recognized verification entity. The manufacturer must provide full disclosure on the type of emission reduction offsets applied. Allowances should be excluded as should any "business as usual" ERs where additionality is questionable. Acceptable offsets are as follows: 1. Any project that is determined to be an eligible Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) provided by article 12 of the Kyoto Protocol. 2. Any project sanctioned by a U.S. State, group of U.S. States (e.g., RGGI), or the Federal Government, where the carbon reduction is assigned or otherwise stated. 3. Any project that is verified and registered as a Gold Standard project (www.cdmgoldstandard.org). 4. Any approved Joint Implementation (JI) project as provided by article 6 of the Kyoto Protocol. 5. Any approved European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) project. 6. Any project that is verified to meet the Voluntary Carbon Standard (www.v-c-s.org). 7. Carbon offsets certified by Center for Resource Solutions (www.green-e.org) or Environmental Resources Trust (www.ert.net). 8. California Climate Registry carbon credits or offsets. 9. All types of offset projects are allowed except for HFC-23 destruction. 10. Acceptable offsets from a demonstrated equivalent (for guidance on showing equivalency, see LEED-EB EAc2 credit ruling from May 2006). The following is acceptable for Scope 2 emissions,* considered indirect electricity emissions: Any direct offsets acceptable for offsetting Scope 1 emissions as well as renewable energy certificates (RECs) certified by Center for Resource Solutions\' Green-e program, Environmental Resources Trust\'s EcoPower program, or demonstrated equivalent (for guidance on showing equivalency, see LEED-EB EAc2 credit ruling from May 2006). -------------------------------- APPENDIX B An environmental claim certifier can use robust and verifiable internationally accepted standards to classify a product as carbon neutral. Use ISO 1404x series of standards for life cycle assessment (LCA) as necessary to formulate the product\'s carbon footprint. Use guidance from USEPA Climate Leaders program, the WRI/WBCSD Greenhouse Gas Protocol, or ISO 14064** as needed for accounting and reporting of emissions and offsets. Complete a copy of the inventory summary used by the US EPA Climate Leaders program. Account for the complete lifecycle (including the product\'s anticipated lifespan). The product\'s entire line of supply and manufacture must be climate neutral. It is not sufficient that a manufacturer purchase offsets solely for the units that are purchased and installed in a specific building; the continuous process that enables a specific product\'s availability to the market must be climate neutral. Minor variables such as color choices do not constitute a separate product. Once this inventory of the product\'s carbon footprint is completed, there must be a 100% offset of Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions.* The following is acceptable for Scope 1 and 3 emissions*: Emission reduction ("ER") offsets must be generated from acceptable project categories which must be independently verified by a recognized verification entity. The manufacturer must provide full disclosure on the type of emission reduction offsets applied. Allowances should be excluded as should any "business as usual" ERs where additionality is questionable. Acceptable offsets are as follows: 1. Any project that is determined to be an eligible Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) provided by article 12 of the Kyoto protocol. 2. Any project sanctioned by a U.S. State, group of U.S. States (e.g., RGGI), or the Federal Government, where the carbon reduction is assigned or otherwise stated. 3. Any project that is verified and registered as a Gold Standard project (www.cdmgoldstandard.org). 4. Any approved Joint Implementation (JI) project as provided by article 6 of the Kyoto Protocol. 5. Any approved European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) project. 6. Any project that is verified to meet the Voluntary Carbon Standard (www.v-c-s.org). 7. Carbon offsets certified by Center for Resource Solutions (www.green-e.org) or Environmental Resources Trust (www.ert.net). 8. California Climate Registry carbon credits or offsets (www.climateregistry.org). 9. All types of offset projects are allowed except for HFC-23 destruction. 10. Acceptable offsets from a demonstrated equivalent (for guidance on showing equivalency, see LEED-EB EAc2 credit ruling from May 2006). The following is acceptable for Scope 2 emissions,* considered indirect electricity emissions: Any direct offsets acceptable for offsetting Scope 1 emissions as well as renewable energy certificates (RECs) certified by Center for Resource Solutions\' Green-e program, Environmental Resources Trust\'s EcoPower program, or demonstrated equivalent (for guidance on showing equivalency, see LEED-EB EAc2 credit ruling from May 2006). SUBMITTALS: Submit the certifier\'s verification of climate neutral product status with a summary of the carbon footprint formulation and means used to achieve climate neutral status. Include a copy of the inventory summary used by the USEPA Climate Leaders program. ------------------------------------------------ * DEFINITIONS: (Source: WRI/WBCSD GHG Protocol. See the GHG Protocol for expanded definitions.) Scope 1 emissions: Emissions from sources under direct control, i.e. at premises under your control or in your vehicle fleet, etc. Scope 2 emissions: Emissions from electricity that is generated elsewhere (i.e., independently, off-site). Scope 3 emissions: Other indirect emissions that are not from owned emission sources, e.g. from the related supply chain, business travel, transportation of purchased fuels, and use of sold products and services. ------------------------------------------------ ** REFERENCED STANDARDS

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
12/18/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We propose that a LEED Innovation & Design Process (IDP) point be awarded to any project that uses only carpet products designated as Environmentally Preferable Products (EPPs) by achieving either \'Gold\' or \'Platinum\' certification as per NSF Standard 140-2005 - Sustainable Carpet Assessment Standard (a draft Standard developed by NSF International, presently in its trial use and comment period) Specifically, we intend to use a Collins & Aikman ER3 Modular Tile product for our LEED-CI (Commercial Interiors) Project. The entire line of ER3 Modular Tile products are SCAS NSF-140 \'Platinum\' certified. The Sustainable Carpet Assessment Standard (SCSA) is the first nation-wide certification program that evaluates all measurable aspects of the environmental performance of carpet products. SCSA seeks to promote products that provide comprehensive environmental, economic, and social benefits while protecting and enhancing the needs of future generations, public health, welfare and the environment over their full commercial cycles, from raw materials extraction to final disposition, and ensuring that such products are also equivalent in performance and quality to other carpet products. Carpet products that carry SCSA \'Gold\' and \'Platinum\' level certification have the added credibility of being subject to regular, independent third-party audits. Upon completion of the trial use and comment period, SCSA will be revised as necessary and submitted to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for approval as an American National Standard. In the baseline LEED Rating Systems, carpet products are evaluated per their indoor VOC emissions, plus the extent to which they might have some recycled content, regional material content, and/or rapidly-renewable material content, thus contributing to the associated Materials & Resources credits. While valuable, such criteria are somewhat limited in scope. By contrast, SCSA takes a broad, life-cycle-based approach to product evaluation, thoroughly examining such varied issues as the environmental impact of the manufacturing processes, social concerns such as the rights and working conditions of company employees, and what happens to carpet products at the end of their useful lives. The draft Sustainable Carpet Assessment Standard consists of the following major categories: Safe for Public Health and Environment Addresses the reduction of inventory pollutants that adversely impact public health and the environment, over the entire supply chain of any given carpet product. Energy & Energy Efficiency Addresses energy use and greenhouse gas emissions associated with carpet production and recognizes the use of renewable energy sources and implementation of conservation and efficiency measures. Bio-based, Recycled Content or Environmentally-Preferable Products Addresses more environmentally-benign feedstocks used to manufacture carpet products and is applicable to either natural or synthetic fiber construction. Manufacturing Addresses company-wide environmental stewardship via reporting and certification protocol, such as adoption of an environmental policy, use of an environmental management system (EMS) and public declaration of performance as per ISO 14001. Reclamation and End-of-Life Management Addresses product reuse and reclamation opportunities as well as installation and maintenance procedures that extend product system life. We feel that this strategy warrants a LEED IDP point because SCAS sets a high benchmark for environmental accomplishment, is comprehensive in nature, and specifically references many other third-party standards to set specific performance criteria. Furthermore, there is precedence for acceptance of such holistic standards for IDP points. In recent CIR Rulings, USGBC has favorably recognized whole product evaluation standards such as MBDC C2C, the California Gold Standard and the Climate Neutral Network Climate Cool Certification. The Project Team hopes that adoption of such a rigorous standard in the carpet industry will stimulate development of similar standards to guide other industries involved in the manufacturing of building products and materials. NSF Standard 140-2005 - Sustainable Carpet Assessment Standard can be accessed on-line at: http://www.nsf.org/business/standards_and_publications/pdf/NSF_140-05-DS....

Ruling:

The suggested criterion encourages innovation through product improvement and is thus acceptable for an innovation point, given that the specific threshold listed below is met and proper documentation is provided upon LEED application. However, the point system proposed does not align with LEED Innovation Points (1/2 Innovation Points cannot be rewarded, and only 1 ID point may be awarded per each green strategy attempted.) The threshold for attaining one (1) Innovation Point is as follows: - use NSF/ANSI 140-2007 certified carpet for all carpet products installed in the project, AND - When silver level carpet is used and carpet represents at least 5% of the value of the project OR - When gold level carpet is used and carpet represents at least 2.5% of the value of the project OR - When platinum level carpet is used and carpet represents at least 1.25% of the value of the project. Please see NCv2.2 CIR Ruling dated 6/6/2007 (for IDc1.1) for additional information on the intended direction of the LEED Rating System. **The USGBC has updated the ruling to this CIR as of 1/22/10 to state that the 1 year sunset provision established in the original Credit Interpretation Ruling related to the NSF/ANSI 140-2007 carpet certification program is hereby extended to all pre LEED-2009 projects , pending the development and adoption of criteria and processes for recognition of third party certification programs in LEED. Said criteria will apply to all currently recognized and proposed future programs. Note: this ruling does not apply to Core and Shell projects. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/19/2002
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Grants for PV Panels The Design Build Team for a government office building in California was given a stipulated sum for the entire scope of the project. In an effort to incorporate green strategies to the project that would otherwise not have economically feasible with the limited budget, the Design Build Team sought out new sources for funding, outside the Project stipulated sum, including federal, state and local grants and industry incentive programs. One identified source was a local utility that would donate photovoltaic panels under the stipulation that the panels had to be incorporated into the architecture, and not just added onto the building. The design team re-designed parts of the exterior, and worked with the exterior building envelope sub-contractors and the PV panel suppliers to develop systems to incorporate the PV panels directly into the exterior curtain wall. As a result, over 300 PV panels were incorporated into the project at no cost to the Owner. The PV wall system includes both structural butt-glazed panels and captured panels, which kept intact the original design intent. Question: Would the seeking out of funding sources for green features be considered an innovation point?

Ruling:

No, securing additional funding for green building features does not constitute an innovation. Rewarding projects that buy down first cost through incentive programs is contrary to the LEED objective of demonstrating green building performance within conventional cost assumptions. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/20/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This project is a laboratory building being constructed in an existing building. As part of the design process, the Labs21 EPC and the LEED Draft Application Guide for Labs were used as a guideline for sustainable design features of the labs. Towards that end, we are proposign the following for ID Credit 1.1: ID CR 1: Laboratory Safety: Intent: Insure the health and safety of laboratory employees Requirements: Design laboratories to ensure contaminants are contained and workers are protected (relates to AGL EQ Pre-Requisite 3 and Credits 9.1 and 9.2) 1. Ensure minimum requirements for safety and worker protection are met through compliance with ANSI / AIHA Z9.5 latest version. 2. Conduct Fume Hood commissioning including ASHRAE-110 method for testing performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods (latest version). This includes field testing each of the new fume hoods as well as each of the existing fume hoods scheduled to remain in the new construction. 3. Design all alarm systems in the laboratory to be inherently self-identifying and fail-safe Submittals will be 1. Letter certifying ventilation design is in compliance with ANSI / AIHA Z9.5 latest version 2. Specifications and Fume Hood Commissioning report 3. Fume hood controls and alarm system diagrams and schematics from design documents Please advise if this suggested point will meet the requirements of the Innovation in Design Credit 1 and will be likely to be awarded to this project.

Ruling:

ASHRAE 110 commissioning of fume hoods is acceptable for an ID credit on your project. To meet the requirement, ALL fume hoods on the project must be commissioned, and commissioning must occur with permanent HVAC systems in place and operating. Your team should be aware that ASHRAE 110 commissioning requires tracer gas testing, which may require the discharge of relatively large quantities of Sulfa Hexafluoride, a climate change gas. Teams using ASHRAE 110 are encouraged to seek alternative testing methods involving other gases, or the use of higher sensitivity sensors so that lower quantities of gases can be used. *Please note a previous ruling to this CIR was posted and has since been revised by the IEQ TAG.* Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/22/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Intent: Implement a "Green Office Program" for building tenants who commit and prove they are operating as a "Green Office". The program will encourage tenants to operate more sustainably even if they are not performing a renovation (LEED-CI) for their office space. The goal is to provide method for tenants to move into the direction of sustainable operation, and with supporting documents showing achievement, be rewarded by the property management office. This will also encourage tenants to perform conduct cost-benefit analysis for improvements that can be achieved at nominal and/or no cost. Even credits that have a cost may still have that cost returned through reduced operating expenses. The "Green Office Program" is promoted through the building tenant guide and distributed by building managers, which encourages tenants to identify and implement no-cost and low-cost alternatives to operating in a standard indoor office environment. Scored on a scale of 100, offices are evaluated in seven categories: Energy Efficiency, People & Atmosphere; Travel & Commuting; Reduce, Reuse & Recycle; Cleaning; Remodeling & Construction; and LEED. When a specific strategy or improvement has been implemented, participating tenants earn "Leaf Credits." If an office achieves "70 Leaf Credits", it is then designated as a GREEN OFFICE. Here are a few items (entire program will be submitted with ID): Energy: - Set computers to "energy save" mode - Lower blinds in summer; raise blinds in winter - Install occupancy light sensors - Replace End of Life computer monitors with Energy Star Equipment - Set "sleep mode" for office equipment - Install compact fluorescent/low mercury light wherever possible People and Atmosphere: -Organize office employees to participate in a sustainability-focused community project once per year -Keep you local office employees updated quarterly about what green efforts you have achieved, your future sustainable goals, and how they can assist in reaching those goals Travel & Commuting: - Instead of traveling for meetings, reduce emissions by encourage teleconferencing and videoconferencing when possible - Ensure 25% of employees carpool or use mass transit to commute to work Reduce/Re-use/Recycle: - Use mugs and tumblers to save waste on disposable cups and plastic bottles - Participate in E-recycle Day for buildings annual e-recycle drive - Transition from petroleum-based or non-compostable products (ex: Styrofoam) to biodegradable products - Do not order any bottled water. Procure bottle-less water coolers to provide cool and hot filtered municipal water Remodeling & Construction: - Certify your office space as LEED-CI - Standardize workspace configuration to accommodate future change that will minimize remodeling and construction - Shift from "closed single offices" to efficient "open-office work plans" Requirements: Every 2 years, the tenant office manager would submit a scorecard to the property manager listing "green opportunities" achieved. Supporting documentation must be provided to achieve the credit. The tenant representative would also be required to attend quarterly building management/tenant meetings to updates to "Green Office Tenant Guidelines" and how they can promote sustainable office/business operation. As you can see, our goal is not to replace LEED-CI. Our program will not only encourage tenants seek LEED-CI, but also help grow our sustainable culture among building occupants beyond the built environment. Many tenants want to operate more sustainably. This program will be their guide.

Ruling:

The described approach would qualify for an Innovation in Operations point due to the comprehensive and extensive education and outreach to building occupants and tenants around sustainability issues. Please note that this initiative falls under the umbrella of green education, and only one education-related IO point can be awarded per project. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/27/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

ID Credit Title: DIGITAL FACILTY MANUAL Credit Intent: Implement an electronic documents tool that will provide for easy access to all record documents of the facility. This paperless tool shall assist the facility manager in maintenance productivity since the documents will available for view in seconds. This tool will be provided at project turnover and the manual will aid the facility group in long term efficiency in energy and systems operations. Requirements for Compliance: Develop and implement a digital facility manual which will be used for facility operation and maintenance in lieu of traditional three-ring binder and as-built drawings. It shall also incorporate guidance on operating metrics and testing frequency. This tool shall include all divisions of work and provide hyperlinks between the equipment submittals and drawings so the facility operators can access record documents easily and thoroughly. The digital facility manual shall include: - All as-built drawings - All approved equipment submittals - All test records and reports - Preventative maintenance tasks and schedules Submittal: Confirm that a digital facility manual is being used and has replaced the need for hard-copy operations and maintenance documentation. Confirm that all as-built drawings, equipment submittals, test records and reports, preventative maintenance tasks and schedules are accessible through the digital facility manual. Provide letter from facility manager or owner the digital facility manual is being used.

Ruling:

The project team is proposing an Innovation in Design credit based on the merits of creating a digital facility manual to be used by facility operation and maintenance staff, in lieu of the traditional three-ring binder and as-built drawings. While this is commendable, the reduction of paper for this facility manual is relatively insignificant compared to the quantity of paper over the duration of the project\'s design and construction phase. As comprehensive, significant environmental benefits have not been identified, this proposal does not meet the requirements of an innovation credit. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/27/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent of credit: ---- Reduce operations related carbon footprint and encourage organizations associated with LEED projects to do likewise. Requirements for compliance: ---- Identify operational sources of carbon emissions not otherwise addressed by LEED. Establish the operational carbon footprint of the occupants of the LEED project verified by a recognized authority. (See CIR dated 6/29/06 for list of authorities). Obtain carbon offsets for the carbon footprint associated with operational sources of carbon emissions equal to or greater than 50% over 2 years**. Submittals: ---- 1. Signed letter template declaring that offsets equivalent to at least 50% of operational carbon emission loads associated with air travel, car travel, and natural gas for a period of at least two years have been obtained. 2. Narrative describing the project\'s approach to addressing carbon loads. 3. Calculation used to determine carbon emissions, resulting equivalence data, and quantity of offset measures required. 4. Certification document from a recognized source of carbon offset credits. Design Approach (Strategies) / Narrative: ---- Reliable analysis of construction related life cycle carbon emissions is difficult to obtain and verify at this time. Emissions data related to operations are more readily available and recognized authorities exist that can quantify the carbon emissions related to operations based on established metrics. This credit addresses carbon emissions other than those addressed by LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power. The following steps describe the actions needed to achieve this credit: Research currently available carbon emission measurement standards and offset options. Identify recognized service providers. (See CIR dated 6/29/06 for list of recognized authorities) List carbon emission sources specific to operations associated with the project in question. Run calculations on offset measures needed. Obtain carbon offset credits at least equivalent to 50% of operational carbon emission loads associated with natural gas, air travel, and car travel for a period of at least two years. This innovation credit meets the three basic criteria for innovation credits as described in the LEED Reference Guide: 1. Quantitative performance improvement: A baseline evaluation of the operational carbon footprint using methods specified by a recognized authority (Green-e for instance) establishes a starting point and is used to calibrate the quantity of carbon offset measures needed. 2. Comprehensive program: The program addresses business related carbon emissions related to air travel, car travel, and natural gas, not covered by LEED and augmenting similar efforts related to electrical loads achieved by meeting LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power requirements. 3. Applicability to other projects: This innovation credit provides an outline for any organization interested in addressing their operational carbon footprint. Similar ID credits related to post occupancy efforts are listed in the USGBC\'s Innovation & Design Credit Catalog (1 December 2007), including credits addressing: Green Cleaning; Monitoring Threatened & Endangered Species; Donation and Protection of Open Space (not assoc. with project site); Alternative Transportation Management Plan; Employee Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions; Food composting; Occupant recycling program; Waste reduction operations; Work at home program; LEED post-occupancy performance evaluation; Employee wellness; Educational program; Student report; Carbon offset; Environmentally preferable services; and Off site environmental benefit. ** Time period and % based on those established for the LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power credit.

Ruling:

The applicant submitted a CIR proposing an innovation and design credit in which projects would offset the emissions associated with tenant space operations. While this proposal does demonstrate environmental benefits, it cannot be approved at this time due to the complexities surrounding carbon accounting. USGBC is performing research in this area and will update this CIR ruling as necessary. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/23/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following proposed innovation in design credit language is intended to demonstrate accomplishment of Comprehensive Exterior VOC Emitting Materials Reduction above and beyond requirements set forth in existing LEED credits. We recognize that an ID credit cannot be granted achievement through the CIR process, but request the review of this proposed approach for viability and appropriateness as written to support a project earning an ID credit by meeting these requirements. Proposed Title: Comprehensive Exterior VOC Emitting Materials Reduction Intent: Provide a safe and healthy outdoor environment for both construction teams and building occupants. Reduce outdoor pollution resulting from construction practices and material selection. Requirements: Significantly reduce the amount of VOCs released to the outdoor air through construction practices and materials selection by specifying low VOC emitting products for each of the following if/as incorporated in the project: ? Factory applied cool roof coating (rather than field applied) ? No added urea-formaldehyde composite wood exterior doors ? Low VOC siding materials (composite wood and cement product) ? Low VOC pesticides and vegetation care products ? Heat island effect: roof- meet LEED-NC SS7.2 credit requirements Submittal: In addition to all corresponding submittal requirements for existing LEED credits, document specific efforts to reduce VOCs external to the building, and describe how a comprehensive exterior VOC reduction that address control and mitigation has been realized. Design Approach: ? Source Control: minimize VOC sources from being installed/used in the exterior building and site construction ? Mitigation: maintain outdoor air quality to minimize VOC presence ? Identify sources of VOCs within the exterior building and site design, and specify low VOC or VOC free alternatives. ? Locate site in area accessible to existing public transportation networks, provide bike storage and showering facilities, provide preferred parking for low emitting and fuel efficient vehicles, and base parking capacity on actual user needs rather than code or precedent for building type. ? Green Seal Standard GC-03 exterior paints, primers, and coatings ? SCAQMD Rule #1168 compliant concrete sealant ? Low VOC exterior caulks and adhesives ? Separate pedestrian traffic flow patterns from vehicle flow patterns ? Heat island effect: non-roof- meet LEED-NC SSc7.1 credit requirements ? SCAQMD Rule #1168 compliant wood stains and wood sealers ? Low VOC decking materials (composite wood and cement product)

Ruling:

The proposed requirements and approach to an ID credit have merit. In order to justify an ID credit, the requirements would need to be more comprehensive than stated, and you would need to provide additional environmental context. To be comprehensive, the requirements should include the VOC limits for concrete sealants and caulks, exterior paints, wood stains and sealers, and metal stains and sealers. Also, the project should describe the regional air quality context to justify the restriction of outdoor emissions of VOCs. For example, the importance of man-made VOC emissions in smog formation varies between regions. If you decide to pursue an ID credit for this approach, be sure to include the full component of chemical products in the requirements and to quantify both the health and environmental benefits. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/10/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Office Furniture and Equipment Recycling Program Seattle Public Utilities, the owner of the Operations Control Center project, operates a number of facilities in Seattle. Instead of procuring furniture and equipment separately for the OCC project and other facilities, SPU has contracts with a limited number of suppliers so that individual items can be recycled and shared between facilities. Is it likely that this program would be approved as an Innovation in Design credit?

Ruling:

The applicant is presenting a potential innovation credit for an Office Furniture and Equipment Recycling Program. Furniture reuse can be applied toward MR Credit 3.3 Resource Reuse, 30% Furniture and Furnishings. An innovation credit for this will be awarded if the next incremental threshold is met, i.e. the credit calculations must demonstrate achievement of a minimum of 60% (based on cost). Please refer to the LEED-CI v2.0 Reference Guide, page 227 for more information on this. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are seeking an Innovation in Design credit for implementation of innovative, environmentally beneficial measures through active intervention in the zoning and land development process of the larger community. In the end, a 16,000 s.f. project was able to leverage over 200,000 s.f. of LEED Gold. Background While St. Stephen\'s was in the design process for its LEED project, a local developer proposed to build on the vacant lot located one property lot away to the south. The project team learned that the developer was preparing to present the building design drawings at an upcoming Harrisburg Planning Commission meeting, during which variances would be requested for significantly exceeding the height and setbacks allowed by city zoning code. St. Stephen\'s publicly opposed providing a variance for these excesses primarily because the neighboring building would cut off access to sunlight that the St. Stephen\'s project team was planning to collect for day lighting and PV arrays. Given the developer\'s and St. Stephen\'s prestige in the community, St Stephen\'s requested a meeting with the developer to discuss the issues to see if the height could be lowered or setbacks aligned with zoning requirements. The outcome was that the developer agreed to meet with the St. Stephen\'s team. Initially the developer brought in his architect to explain the designs. The St. Stephen\'s team also presented its sunshade studies. The developer agreed to examine stepping the new building back between the 5th and 8th stories so that the St. Stephen\'s complex would not be in shadow so often. Ultimately, no accommodations for setbacks were provided and it was acknowledged that the developer had no intention of making it a sustainable or LEED building. Soon thereafter, the developer divulged that the tenant would be Pennsylvania Housing and Finance Authority (PHFA). Resulting LEED Achievement During the time period that followed, St. Stephen\'s thought that there was an opportunity in this to leverage their position and negotiate a greater good by supporting the proposed zoning variances. At the time in 2002, very few PA state agencies were pursuing LEED certification for their buildings, with the exception of DEP. The project team thought that fighting the developer and PHFA might ultimately gain the 16,000 s.f. St. Stephen\'s school daylight, but rather than be "penny wise and pound foolish" the project team realized that there would be a much greater benefit if they could convince a public agency to make greater accommodations that would benefit the larger Harrisburg and Pennsylvania community in the name of environmental responsibility. They believed this could be especially important given that the agency is the PHFA that would deal with the future housing in the state. As a result, the St Stephen\'s project team invited the PHFA representatives to join in the discussions with the developer. During the subsequent meetings, the St. Stephen LEED design team educated the building\'s developer and its tenant, the PHFA, about sustainable design buildings and negotiated a formal agreement. This agreement accomplished 1) a minimum silver rated building for a state agency, 2) a smaller building that was "stepped back" so that it would relate better to the surrounding small and historic buildings within the neighborhood and not leave them all in shadow, 3) higher density in the neighborhood by allowing a smaller setback and taller building than zoning permitted, and 4) greater access to solar energy for the Episcopal school by granting St. Stephen\'s rights to harvest solar energy from the PHFA roof, which is much larger than St. Stephen\'s and would see more daylight than St Stephen\'s would otherwise due to surrounding buildings and trees. As a result of the St. Stephen\'s project team efforts, the developer and PHFA were prompted to enlisted their architect to redesign their project to include sustainable design features and achieve the minimum LEED silver rating that St. Stephen\'s demanded as part of the negotiated agreement, which is why sustainable design became one of the inherent development goals of the PHFA building. The PHFA building ultimately received LEED Gold Certification in September 2005.

Ruling:

The USGBC does not consider this proposal alone to merit an innovation credit. However, a comprehensive public education program on LEED rating system and the benefits of green building is a laudable strategy worthy of an innovation credit. A green education program must meet the requirements of CIR ruling dated 9/24/2001. The proposed narrative outlining the educational outreach program undertaken by the project, can contribute as one of the educational elements. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/6/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

INQUIRY: To help stimulate the development of sustainable product evaluation and certification tools by building professionals, we are seeking to establish an innovation point for specification of products certified under the SMART & California Gold Sustainable Product Programs explained at: http://mts.sustainableproducts.com/SMART_Building_Product_Standard SMART & California Gold provide manufacturers with a transparent measure of sustainable product achievement through consensus based standards. They help customers purchase and specify products that are pursuing a broad definition of quality. Through SMART and California Gold, this broader definition of quality means using products and materials safe for public health and environment as measured by LCA and 12 life cycle impacts; using renewable energy and energy efficiency; using recycled and biobased organic materials with EPA best management practices; increased water conservation; facility and company achievements; social equity; and product reuse and reclamation. SMART & California Gold meet all 24 Sustainable Product Certification Criteria (SPC Criteria) found here: http://sustainableproducts.typepad.com/Sustainable_Product_Certification.... To qualify for this CIR, SMART Gold & California Gold must have at the manufacturing facility 60% Green-e Power or 60% conventional energy reduction from the baseline. SMART & California Platinum must have 80% Green-e or 80% conventional energy reduction for both the manufacturing facility and suppliers. Eighty percent of all SMART & California Gold credits reduce climate change pollution. If a candidate product achieves the necessary criteria, it is certified as a Silver, Gold or Platinum Sustainable Product and must complete independent third party global auditing requirements of manufacturer and supplier facilities. The following Intent, Requirements and Submittals for this Innovation in Design application are suggested: Intent: Help stimulate the development of certified sustainable products for use by building professionals. Requirements: Use SMART or California Gold Certified building materials and products for 2.5% of the total value of all building materials and products used in the project, based on cost. The "cost value" of products for the purposes of this calculation will be discounted by 50% for Silver level products, and doubled for products certified at the platinum level: Cost value of products = (Silver x 0.5) + Gold (1.0) + (Platinum x 2) Submittals: Spreadsheet matrix with the following information: DEFAULT MATERIALS VALUE Total construction costs (hard costs for CSI Master Format 1995 Divisions 2-10 and 12** only): _______ Default materials cost (total Divisions 2-10 and 12** construction cost x 0.45): _______ OR ACTUAL MATERIALS VALUE Actual materials cost (excluding labor and equipment) hard costs for CSI Master Format 1995 Divisions 2-10 only): _______ - Material Name/Description - Manufacturer - Total Material Cost ($) - Percent Of Product SMART or California Gold Certified (% by Weight) - Compliant Product Value - Adjusted value (Silver x 0.5, Gold x 1.0, Platinum x2) Total "cost value" ($) of SMART or California Gold certified materials: _______ SMART or California Gold certified material value as a percentage of total materials cost*: _______ *To qualify for this ID credit the percentage of SMART or California Gold certified materials must be at least 2.5% of the total materials cost. **CSI Master Format 1995 Division 12 may be included in calculations if materials from Division 12 are used consistently with calculations in credits MRc3-7 in LEED-NC or MRc3-6 in LEED-CS. LEED-CI projects are required to include Division 12 components in the calculation of this ID point, as these components are required for calculations in CI credits MRc4-7. Please refer to the LEED-CI Reference Guide\'s credit calculation instructions for guidance in calculating these credits.

Ruling:

Yes, the suggested criterion encourages innovation through product improvement and is thus acceptable for an innovation point, given proper documentation upon LEED application. Note that the MR TAG and others intend to work towards establishing a set of criteria for product evaluation and certification tools that are referenced in LEED, whether in innovation points or in rating system credit language; and once those criteria have been established, it will be necessary to revisit whether or not proposed innovation points based on this draft language should continue to be approved. Regardless of the state of above-mentioned process, this CIR proposal\'s approval sunsets one year from the ruling posting date, at which time it is to be considered for renewal. **** The USGBC has updated the ruling to this CIR as of 9/28/09 to state that the 1 year sunset provision established in the original Credit Interpretation Ruling related to the SMART and California Gold sustainable product certification programs is hereby extended to all pre LEED-2009 projects, pending the development and adoption of criteria and processes for recognition of third party certification programs in LEED. Said criteria will apply to all currently recognized and proposed future programs. **** Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/22/2005
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

PULSED POWER TECHNOLOGY [Alternative Process Water Treatment] Intent: Reduce the impact of potentially hazardous chemical discharges to the environment by eliminating conventional means of process water treatment in HVAC equipment. Reduce amount of water consumption from conventional recirculating water systems such as cooling towers, hydronic HVAC systems, or process water systems by decreasing the need for make-up water caused by evaporation and system blowdown (or bleed). Requirements: Provide an integral chemical-free water treatment technology in place of conventional water treatment which uses potentially toxic chemicals which may also produce potentially hazardous chemical byproducts. Provide documentation in the form of a letter from the project engineer that includes a narrative description of the chemical-free water treatment system used and how the system works. The narrative shall specifically state the environmental benefits of using the chemical-free process in place of the conventional chemical water treatment system; state specific chemicals and their estimated quantities eliminated by substituting the chemical-free process; state the methods and quantities of process water discharge as an estimate of potential water savings. Rationale: Recirculating water systems used in building mechanical processes such as HVAC heat rejection in cooling towers and hydronic heating and cooling systems often use chemical infiltration using manual or automatic injection processes in order to chemically treat the water contained in them. Chemical treatment is typically used for a wide range of functions such as the prevention of mineral scale formation, control of microbiological populations, and to inhibit corrosion. These functions may be equally served by the introduction of an electronic process known as pulsed power technology. Environmental benefits of the pulsed power technology are achieved simply with the elimination of potentially hazardous chemicals and their toxic byproducts used to prevent formation of mineral scale, control of microbiological populations, and inhibit corrosion. Conventional chemical treatment systems often ultimately cause the release of potentially hazardous substances into the environment through water discharge such as evaporation, spills, spray, and drift. In conventional process water systems such as open cooling towers chlorine or other biocides are used to control biological activity which is rapidly discharged to the atmosphere as chlorine gas. Corrosion inhibitors such as zinc, molybdenates, and phosphates are discharged in the drift from the cooling tower and spray settling to the ground as well as through the sewer system through blowdown draining. Water softeners, not needed in pulsed power processes, are typically used to prevent scaling and discharge quantities of salt brine as part of the softener process. The use of an alternative means of process water treatment in HVAC equipment such as the pulsed power technology is estimated to yield the following benefits and savings when applied to our building project: - the elimination of potentially hazardous chemicals and their toxic byproducts with the elimination of conventional chemical water treatment processes - saves the use of approximately 186 gallons per year of industrial strength chlorine bleach, 5 to 6 gallons of isothiazine, and 115,000 gallons of water containing 2 ppm zinc and 20 ppm phosphate from being discharged into the environment - saves the requirement for approximately 90 lbs. of chlorine per year (most of which is evaporated to the atmosphere) - Annual water usage savings of approximately 67,275 gal/yr when compared to a typical open system water cooling process (cooling tower) of the same capacity with conventional chemical treatment processes Please confirm attainability of this credit.

Ruling:

The environmental benefits presented are worthy of an innovation credit. However, the type of technology you are referencing may be one that has been controversial in regards to actual results. Your LEED documentation must provide the information above, plus proof that the technology truly works: a copy of a third-party analysis and/or letters from at least two of the vendor\'s previous clients (building engineers or facility managers) that confirm the equipment is operating successfully. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/5/2004
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ozone System in Lap Pool and Spa: exceptional IEQ Our project is a sports facility with a 6-lane, 25m swimming pool and 2 spas. Instead of the conventional chlorine system, we are using an ozone system to treat the water. The Ozone system has the following advantage: - Destroys bacteria, mold and mildew - Eliminates spores, yeasts, fungus and inactivates viruses - Aids the removal of minerals such as iron and manganese - Water is softer and has neutral pH - Leaves no unpleasant chemical or smell, no chloramines build-up, the by-products of ozone are heat and pure oxygen - No irritation to the eyes, nasal passages or throat - Will not cause dry skin, bleached hair or faded swimwear - Reduce chlorine consumption to a minimum, saving money on maintenance, and avoid storing such toxic chemical on site. To summarize, the system reduces the use of chlorine greatly (50-75% depending on splash limit). Unlike chlorine, ozone leaves no unpleasant odors or residual chemicals in the pool and spas. It eliminates the problems of red and irritated eyes, dry skin, faded swim wear and other problems associated with chlorine. We believe that this system has significantly increased the indoor environment quality of the project, especially when the pool and spas are frequently used being in a sports facility instead of a private residence. And a large amount of occupants will be benefited. Therefore, we would like to use this for one of our Innovation and Design Credits. Please advice on the feasibility.

Ruling:

The proposed strategy, if incorporated properly, may warrant an innovation credit. The use of an ozonation system that is properly sized and integrated into the swimming pool treatment system will allow ozone to act as the primary oxidizer and disinfectant. Since there is no uniform standard which has been established for ozonation of pools, ozone design criteria for disinfection in the United States is based primarily around US EPA Drinking Water Guidelines. Dose rate values between .4 mg-O3/l are normally cited and .8 mg-O3/l is commonly used. While LEED encourage approaches that reduce the use of toxic chemicals, additional information is required to provide a complete assessment of credit achievement in this case. Please describe limited reduction of chlorine (e.g., state if regulations require a minimum level of chlorine), and provide detailed explanation and proof of substantial environmental benefits (quantified as much as possible). See IDc1.1 CIR review dated 5/21/2003 for further guidance on this issue including appropriate documentation. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/24/2001
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Title: Green Building EducationINTENT: To provide public education focusing on green building strategies and solutions.REQUIREMENTS AND SUBMITTALS: Credit 1.1 (1 point) Provide permanent educational displays illustrating at least one component of each of the five major green building categories in the LEED rating system:Sustainable SitesWater EfficiencyEnergy and AtmosphereIndoor Environmental QualityMaterials and Resources- Provide narrative to describe the intended green building education program that will use the displays.- Provide narrative to describe the selected green building educational displays.- Provide design drawings of the educational displays and their locations in the building.Credit 1.2 (1 point) Provide educational outreach focusing on sustainable living and building practices to serve the general public.- Provide education program with identifiable tasks and outcomes geared toward sustainable living and building practices.- Develop an ongoing education program to provide access to practical methods for homeowners and others for sustainable living and building practices.SUMMARY OF REFERENCED STANDARDS: There are no such referenced standards for this credit.GREEN BUILDING CONCERNS: Public education is necessary to encourage green building practices in public programs, private development, and residential communities. The purpose of this innovative credit is to encourage public education in green building projects and provide a strategy to meet that goal.Mission Statement: To inspire people to live more sustainably, using flexible and achievable standards for building and landscaping practices in such a way as it will protect our local and regional natural resources.DESIGN APPROACH: Even though this credit is designed with an environmental education center in mind, the principles of public education can be applied to either public or private structures. For example, office buildings, although a private enterprise, have employees coming and going each day. A building that is didactic and is reinforced with clearly defined educational displays can have a significant impact on the user\'s understanding of the built and natural environment. Transforming thoughtful design solutions into educational opportunities is the intent of this credit. Also, disseminating effective and practical information on sustainable living and building practices to the general public is a fundamental way to make changes in our society.

Ruling:

To take advantage of the educational value of the green building features of a project and to earn a LEED point, any approach should be ACTIVELY instructional. Two of the following three elements must be included in the educational program:1) A comprehensive signage program built into the building\'s spaces to educate the occupants and visitors of the benefits of green buildings. This program may include windows to view energy-saving mechanical equipment or signs to call attention to water-conserving landscape features.2) The development of a manual, guideline or case study to inform the design of other buildings based on the successes of this project. This manual will be made available to the USGBC for sharing with other projects.3) An educational outreach program or guided tour could be developed to focus on sustainable living, using the project as an example. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/10/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following proposed innovation in design credit is intended to demonstrate that Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST) designed for distribution of natural gas and LPG (propane Gas) systems saves time, reduces cost, and is environmentally friendly where integrated in a holistic approach to a building project. This innovative technology is the only standard based natural gas and LPG (propane gas) system manufactured, designed sized and installed under the ANSI LC1 certification process. CSST is IAPMO, ICC and CSA listed; IFGC, UPC and NFPA-54 approved as a gas-piping material. This system is installed with fewer fittings eliminating leak paths in the natural gas or LPG (propane gas) system, thus making the system safer within a structure. The inherent flexibility and light weight will reduce costs and help prevent job related accidents. Most manufactures\' of CSST incorporate a fitting which uses a metal to metal seal with no gaskets or O-rings and features which allows for maintaining of the integrity of the Polyethylene jacket protecting the system from corrosion and harsh environments. The Polyethylene jacket, as required by ANSI LC1, is constructed to meet the ASTM E84 requirement for Fire /Smoke (25/50) making the system safer in the event of fire. This innovative technology eliminates the need for welding of natural gas and LPG piping and the dangers associated with such procedures, such as toxic fumes from welding gases, flux and brazing rods and smoke and soot caused by welding. This technology reduces respiratory problems associated with inhaling the toxic fumes resulting from welding of natural gas and LPG piping and eliminates the dangers of fire associated with welding of natural gas and LPG piping. It also eliminates personal injury associated with the use of welding and threading equipment. It is our intent to submit for this credit as a system which exceeds the LEED-NC performance as related to a safer environment during construction and safer system within a structure, for the life of the structure.

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification as to whether the use of Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing for distribution of natural gas and LPG warrants the award of an Innovation in Design credit. While the benefit of reduced exposure for construction workers and building occupants are laudable, this concern is addressed in EQ Credit 3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan - During Construction. As stated on page 325 of the NCv2.2 Reference Guide, "This credit is not eligible for exemplary performance under the Innovation in Design Section". Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/24/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Innovation & Design Process: Exemplary Performance in Alternative Transportation - Hybrid Vehicle Reimbursement Program Intent Reduce pollution and energy impacts from automobile use. Requirements To receive an innovation point, the project team will demonstrate that a comprehensive hybrid vehicle reimbursement program is in place with clear performance goals, including: 1. A statement of purpose describing what the program is trying to achieve from a health and environmental standpoint, focusing on reduced carbon emissions. 2. Procedural requirements for employees who participate in the program to comply with the guidelines. 3. A clear set of acceptable performance metrics by which to measure progress or achievement, such as a sample request for reimbursement form stating all data gathered (i.e. miles driven, vehicle purchased, vehicle replaced, vehicle fuel consumption, etc.), and calculated statistics, including equivalent pounds of carbon dioxide NOT released, compared to the baseline (vehicles driven, fuel consumed, and emissions released, prior to the program). 4. Documentation of the program\'s vehicle and procurement specifications, including a list of approved vehicles, and employee eligibility guidelines. Demonstrate that the vehicles purchased and miles driven result in improved environmental impact. Submittals 1. Copy of program guidelines and eligibility requirements. 2. Copy of request for reimbursement form. 3. Calculations illustrating number of participating employees, vehicles purchased, vehicles replaced, miles driven each week for commuting purposes, and whether the program influenced the decision to purchase a hybrid. 4. Calculations quantifying equivalent pounds of carbon dioxide NOT released. Design Approach As part of a corporate commitment to reduce its environmental impact, as well as a comprehensive effort to improve its leadership on environmental issues, including LEED-CI certification of its Corporate Center interiors, Bank of America announced on June 7, 2006 that it will reimburse Associates living within 90 miles of Charlotte, Boston, and Los Angeles and purchasing a new hybrid vehicle $3,000. Available to more than 49,000 associates, the program addresses a correlation between air quality, limited travel options (other than single-rider vehicles), and commute length. As of September 7, 2006, 200 Bank of America associates, including 118 in Charlotte, have taken advantage of the program and the Bank expects up to 100 more will participate by the end of 2006. The program is available to all associates working in the Bank of America Corporate Center and it is possible to monitor how many of those associates take advantage of the program. We request a ruling on whether implementation of this program would achieve an Innovation & Design credit, since it is available to ALL Bank of America Associates living within 90 miles of Charlotte, where the Bank of America Corporate Center Renovation Pilot Project is located.

Ruling:

The applicant is proposing an innovation and design credit for Exemplary Performance of SSc4.3, Alternative Transportation based on an incentive program for those employees purchasing new hybrid vehicles. The USGBC would like to clarify that under LEED-CI there is no credit titled SSc4.3. In LEED-CI, Alternative Transportation credits fall under SSc3.1, SSc3.2 and SSc3.3 with no direct correlating credit to LEED-NC SSc4.3, Alternative Transportation: Low-Emission & Fuel Efficient Vehicles. The LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide states that projects may be awarded one innovation point for Exemplary Performance in alternative transportation, SSc4, by instituting a comprehensive transportation management plan that demonstrates a quantifiable reduction in personal automobile use through the implementation of multiple alternative options. Following this criteria under LEED-CI, an innovation point could be awarded for the incentive program, as long as it is part of a comprehensive transportation management plan that takes into account other modes of alternative transportation. The incentive program would also need to be redefined to align with the LEED-NC v2.2 definition of low-emission and fuel-efficient vehicles which are either classified as Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEV) by the California Air Resources Board or have achieved a minimum green score of 40 on the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide. Based on LEED-NC v2.1 CIR ruling dated 5/9/2003, components of a transportation management plan that might be useful toward achieving an innovation credit include: active use of a regional carpool database; a "guaranteed ride home" program for carpoolers; transit trip planning assistance; and subsidizing regional transit passes, Amtrak commuter train tickets, and bicycle purchases for bicycle commuters. Please note that the achievement of credits SSc3.1, SSc3.2 and SSc3.3 will increase the likelihood of achievement of an innovation credit for exemplary performance of Alternative Transportation. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/20/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

For our multifamily project, we propose the following approach to earn an ID point for transportation management. Please confirm whether this strategy is likely to earn an ID point if appropriately implemented and documented, and if not, what additional activities would be necessary to earn the credit. We propose to implement a two-part program to encourage bicycle use and reduce automobile use. Due to our suburban community\'s lack of a comprehensive, convenient public transportation system, we believe biking will be residents\' preferred alternative transportation mode. (Please note that this means we may not meet SSc4.1 requirements for public transportation access, but will meet 4.2, 4.3, and 4.4). (1) Implement a bicycle check-out program by which the apartment community loans bikes to residents to use for free. We expect the bikes would be used for errands and other periodic trips (when public transportation may not be practical), reducing automobile use for these trips. The bikes would also be used for recreation/exercise, contributing to a healthier community. For a 500-person community, we would purchase 5 bikes. (2) Subsidize residents\' purchase of bicycles for daily commuting. The check-out program would not be able to serve regular bike commuters. For these residents, the property will subsidize 10% of the purchase cost (up to $100) of a bicycle. Per LEED CIR ruling IDc1.1-5/9/2003, the program will continue for at least 5 years or 50 bicycles, whichever comes first.

Ruling:

Innovation credits are awarded during the certification process, not through the CIR process. This ruling is to provide guidance about the likely measures and documentation that would need to be included in the credit application. The intent of the comprehensive transportation management innovation credit is to implement multiple measures towards achieving a reduction in single passenger vehicle usage and the associated emissions. The proposed bicycle sharing and subsidies will contribute towards a comprehensive transportation management plan, but are not sufficient to qualify on their own. To develop a comprehensive transportation management plan the project team should incorporate measures to increase the use of carpooling and low-emitting vehicles similar to those listed in CIR ruling IDc1.1-5/9/2003. Furthermore, the bicycle subsidy program should offer a discount of at least 20% per CIR ruling SSc4.3-7/5/2007. Although, this CIR refers to parking discounts the same incentive would be necessary to be meaningful in all potential markets. The project team may also want to consider pursuing an innovation credit for exemplary performance under SSc4.2. This credit may be achieved in a residential development by providing covered storage facilities for at least 30% of the building residents, and by demonstrating adequate demand for the additional bicycle storage capacity and the existence of nearby destinations accessible by bicycle and/or the existence of bicycle infrastructure such as bike lanes or bike paths.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
3/11/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

BACKGROUND Under LEED EB EQ Credit 3.9, a point can be earned for achieving Green Cleaning: Integrated Indoor Pest Management. As LEED EB has identified the requirements for Integrated Indoor Pest Management, it does provide a point of reference and reduces the amount of invention/discovery required to create a green pest management program, particularly in light of the absence of a comparable foundation on this subject within the existing NC Reference Guide and CIRs. INTENT Award a point for achievement of an Integrated Indoor Pest Management program by adoption and execution of the intent, requirements, and submittals of EB EQ 3.9 for the purposes of achieving an Innovation and Design Credit under NC 2.2.

Ruling:

A project may earn an innovation credit based on an applicable credit in another LEED rating system, provided the specific requirements of that credit are met, and the appropriate documentation is provided during the submission process. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/27/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This innovation credit is being sought by addressing a significant environmental benefit that the Lutron Quantum system provides. The Lutron Quantum system is a complete-project light and energy management system that will be installed in the confidential client\'s space. The Quantum system provides the following:

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting a potential ID credit for the use of an advanced building lighting and energy management system. Many of the benefits that this system provides are accounted for in other LEED credits, such as energy conservation, daylighting, and measurement and verification. However, based on the description of the lobby/entryway real-time energy consumption display, it seems like this strategy may be considered as part of a comprehensive educational ID credit. Refer to the LEED-NC v2.1 IDc1.1 CIR Ruling dated 9/24/2001 for more information on the requirements for a Green Building Education ID credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/29/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Integrated HVAC for Building & Greenhouse This CIR proposes an innovation design credit for a design to integrate the HVAC system between the greenhouse and the main building of the new Pacific Garden Mission (PGM) facility in Chicago. The intent of the proposed design innovation is to: 1) use the greenhouse vegetation to help improve the air quality in parts of the main building; 2) pass the building exhaust air through the greenhouse to provide carbon dioxide enriched air to help in plant growth in the greenhouse. The new PGM facility includes a men\'s and a women\'s greenhouse attached to the south wall of the facility. The design calls for an HVAC system that can operate in the following three modes modes: 1)Exhaust building air from the adjacent 1st floor rooms through the greenhouse to help heat and cool the greenhouse, keep it positively pressurized to avoid infiltration. Our preliminary energy modeling indicates that this mode of operation will result in annual avoided heating costs of at least $2,500 or over 1% of the projected energy costs for the current building design. Exhausting building air through the greenhouses will promote plant growth by supplying greenhouse with CO2-enriched building exhaust air. 2)Draw air through the greenhouse so that it can be tempered and supply part of the make-up air required for the dining/kitchen area. 3)Divert the air from the adjacent rooms through the greenhouse to clean, humidify it, and enrich it with oxygen before it returns back to the building. Our approach is to include the energy saving aspects of these design features in the energy model of the building that has been prepared for EA Credit 1 Optimized Energy Performance. Therefore, our proposed Innovation Design Credit is for the environmental benefits of this design that integrates the HVAC systems of the greenhouse and main building. We look forward to the USGBC\'s guidance on this exciting potential innovation in design.

Ruling:

It is not clear that circulating air through the greenhouse will improve IEQ. It is equally as likely that the greenhouse could introduce allergens. Some of the supposed benefits (humidity control) are already addressed by existing credits. To better understand the air quality benefits of exhausting building air into the greenhouse, and more importantly, drawing recirculated air through the greenhouse for use in the occupied building, the team would have to provide additional evidence to earn an Innovation in Design Credit. Modes 1 and 2 above will provide energy savings and should be included in EAc1. Mode 3 would require evidence, such as monitoring, demonstrating that the air returning to the building is cleaner and enriched. As to humidification of the air, humidity sensors, awarded under EQc7.2, would be required to substantiate the claim and ensure that the air does not have too high of a moisture content. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2003
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Transportation Management Plan The INTENT of this innovation credit is to provide occupants of the building additional options for Alternate Transportation through the use of a Transportation Management Plan. The proposed REQUIREMENTS are to include the following features in the Transportation Management Plan: Rideshare Matching Assistance, Subsidized Regional Transit Pass ( In lieu of providing 3% with Alternative Fuel Vehicles ), Bike Subsidy and User Groups, Amtrak Subsidy, Guaranteed Ride Home Program. The required SUBMITTALS would require all features listed in the Requirements to be summarized in a narrative and in the form of the LEED letter templates. Possible DESIGN APPROACHES would include working with the local Transportation Management Association or local agency to figure out which options are best suited for the occupants of the building. The following paragraphs further explain of how the requirements will be met. Per the Transportation Management Plan filed with the City of Sacramento, and DPR\'\'s subsequent commitment to participate in and financially support the South Natomas Transportation Management Association (TMA), the following programs and services will be available to all DPR South Natomas employees as well as employees of any subtenant occupying 2480 Natomas Park Drive. Rideshare Matching Assistance The South Natomas TMA supports and uses the regional carpool database, www.1800COMMUTE.org to provide matches for short-term emergencies or long term carpool arrangements. Additionally, we will provide personalized transit trip planning assistance, providing employees a detailed explanation of how to take the bus from home to work, and back again. Prior to DPR relocating to the new South Natomas facility, all occupants will provide their names and nearest cross streets, so that carpool database will generate a personalized transit trip and/or carpool matchlist for each occupant of the building. Subsidized Regional Transit Passes We have a cooperative agreement with Regional Transit to provide photo identification Regional Transit passes to ALL member employees. This is similar to the requirement in SS4.3 to provide alternate fuel vehicles for 3% of the building. By subsidizing the Transit Pass for ALL occupants we feel that we are meeting the intent of the Alternate Transportation credits. This RT pass is valid on Regional Transit light rail and buses for both commute and non-commute trips. YoloBus, Placer County Transit and also accept this pass. Bike Subsidy and Users Group The Bike Users Group is a result of the Bucks for Bikes Program, which provides South Natomas TMA members commute bike purchase subsidies. The South Natomas BUG also provides a voice for cyclists throughout the South Natomas area, advocating safer trails and road conditions, and supporting education for current bicycle commuters and encouragement for fellow cyclists new to commuting by bike. DPR\'\'s bike lockers will complement the employees\'\' participation in our bike-related activities and support bicycle commuting. Amtrak Capitol Corridor Subsidy We offer up to 10 monthly subsidies of $28 each, or the full fare, whichever is lower, to member employees for reimbursement of an Amtrak Capitol Corridor monthly pass or multi-ride ticket. Employees have the option of either transferring to RT # 88/87 (with their Regional Transit pass) to connect to/from the Amtrak station and South Natomas or riding a bike through Discovery Park. (Amtrak has generous facilities for riders to bring bikes on board). Guaranteed Ride Home Program This program provides employees who rideshare two or more days per week and experience a mid-day emergency, or who have to work unexpected overtime, with a free guaranteed ride home using a taxi or rental car service up to 6 times per year.

Ruling:

**Update 7/1/2015: removed reference to LEED Interpretation 1547
Innovation credits are awarded during the certification process, not through the CIR process. This ruling is provided as guidance about the likely outcome if accomplishments are proven by the certification submittals. The applicant is inquiring about the potential for achieving an innovation point for exemplary performance in alternate transportation by instituting a comprehensive Transportation Management Plan (TMP). The project is likely to be awarded the innovation point as long as: (1) SS Credits 4.1, 4.2, and 4.4 are achieved; (2) the commitment requirements listed below are met; and (3) all commitments are adequately and officially documented. Components of the TMP that were found useful toward achieving this innovation credit include: active use of the regional carpool database; a "guaranteed ride home" program for carpoolers; transit trip planning assistance; and subsidizing regional transit passes, Amtrak commuter train tickets, and bicycle purchases for bicycle commuters. Specific details and additional requirements are as follows: Use of the regional carpool database contributes toward exemplary performance, if personalized carpool match lists are provided for all current occupants, as well as for new occupants, and the "guaranteed ride home" program is implemented. Official documentation (e.g., a signed letter, or an excerpt from company policy or employee manuals) must show at least a 5-year commitment to these programs. Please note that the practice of subsidizing regional transit passes and Amtrak tickets for occupants IS NOT equivalent in SS Credit 4.3\'s requirement to provide alternate fuel vehicles (contrary to your assertion), even though it displaces vehicle use. However, the transit subsidization program can count toward exemplary performance in relation to SS Credit 4.1, Public Transportation access, if a 5-year (or longer) agreement has been signed and a copy of the agreement is submitted with the LEED application. Transit trip planning also counts toward exemplary performance. State the number of employees that are initially provided personalized trip information and document the policies/procedures that ensure the same service for new employees. Bicycle locker installation is standard practice for SS Credit 4.2. Bike purchase subsidies for bike commuters contribute toward exemplary performance, if a commitment for at least 5 years or 50 bicycles (whichever comes first) is shown via LEED application submittals.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
9/6/2005
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We request a Credit Interpretation for an Innovation and Design credit for Exemplary Recycling Performance. In a CIR Ruling dated 3/8/04, you state that a recycling ID credit can be achieved if there is a ".substantial and measurable environmental benefit." You mention that previous projects have achieved an innovation credit by calculating the amount of material recycling achieved by MRp1 and then calculating the percent improvement over that recycling rate they achieved by recycling/reusing additional materials.Our question relates to applying this credit to a university campus where many of the facilities are shared. Our project is a renovation of a residence hall. In addition to recycling the basic recyclables required in MRp1, we offer collection of wooden pallets, old electronic equipment, furniture, batteries and other materials. We also have an extensive, university-wide composting program that collects organic cafeteria scrap and landscaping waste. The cafeteria is a separate building that serves students, faculty and staff on campus. The landscaping waste is collected from the entire campus, including our project site. In fiscal year \'05 every building on campus collected the basic recyclables mentioned in MRp1, collecting 195 tons of material (173 tons paper, 11 tons cardboard, and 11 tons cans and bottles). We recycled an additional 453 tons of other materials (167 tons landscaping waste, 186 tons food waste, and 100 tons other recyclables), for a 233% increase in our overall recycling rate.We understand that ID credits are not awarded through the CIR process, but we would like to know if an ID credit can be achieved for campus-wide exemplary performance. The students who will live in our residence hall are also using our cafeteria and using the landscaped common areas that contribute to the composting collection. The residence halls, classrooms, libraries, cafeteria, and common spaces within our campus collectively represent one community and our recycling efforts are geared towards this community. We would also like to know the target percentage for exemplary performance in recycling. By how much must a project increase their recycling collection compared to what is collected for MRp1 to achieve an ID credit?

Ruling:

According to the IDc1.1 ruling on 3/8/04, the concept in your proposal is viable. In addition to the doubling of the Prerequisite 1 minimum materials benchmark (by weight, volume or recycling rate), an overall campus-wide recycling rate of 40% must be achieved in order to qualify for the point (40% is taken from LEED-EB MRc5). Landscape waste must not be factored into the volume of waste collected, as it is standard practice (and often regulated) to compost landscaping waste instead of sending it to landfill. All regulated wastes must also be excluded. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/19/2002
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ecologically Based Landscape Design and Pest Control: The project site is an urban infill site located in Sacramento, California. The project is an office building for the State of California, housing the Department of Education. Prior to the design and construction of the new office building, the site was a surface parking lot with a few trees surrounding the site on the perimeter. Adjacent to the project is a six-story apartment building and across from the site is the California State Capitol mall, a park like setting, with many differing plants and tree species represented. Contained within the project is a small pocket park, which separates the office building from the adjacent apartment building. The park was selected as a site for the State Arts in Architecture program, and a nationally known artist was selected for the art commission. In response to community outreach efforts, and in response to neighborhood concerns about open space, the Design Team for the project worked with the artist to develop a unique response. The team worked on the development of the landscape design using specific features listed below, coupled with the strategy of an ecologically based landscape management and maintenance program. The team also sought to use the project landscape as a means to educate and promote the use of organic based urban landscaping and agricultural farming and the use of beneficial insects as a substitute for pesticides. Features of the Ecologically based Landscape Design and Pest Control include: - An interpretive fountain and sculpture that uses gray water and that reflects the culture and environs of the Sierra Foothills; - Native plant materials, selected for their appropriateness to the climate, low water requirements, adaptation of the native cultural landscape of the region, and aesthetic appeal. Plant material was also selected for its ability to provide habitat for beneficial insects; - Organic landscape specifications including soil mix management, sub-surface drip irrigation, gray water and organic fertilizers; - An irrigation system that utilizes high efficiency drip technology and reduces water consumption by 63%; - A fertilizing and feeding plan, which includes a biological nutrient management using compost tea, injected into the irrigation system; - The project also has a retail component, designated as restaurant space. Once restaurant tenants are identified, the Design Team will work with the tenants to develop a composting process to recycle organic waste streams from the building and the restaurant tenants, including food waste, landscape pruning, etc. - Training of the building and grounds maintenance staff to monitor for insect pests and plant disease. Training the staff to release beneficial insects as the primary means of pest control, and training the staff to use soft pesticides and to avoid toxins. - Educational stations with plaques and graphics delineating the ecological methods utilized, beneficial insect and plant identification and their symbiotic relationships. - Consultation on pest problems and supplying beneficial insects to the project for the duration of the two-year warranty period. Question: Could this interpretive pocket park, developed with neighborhood concerns, educational goals and coupled with organic practices be considered an innovation point?

Ruling:

Yes, this project could attempt an innovation credit by addressing the education value of the "green" features of the park. A previous LEED Interpretation on the issue of an educational program in relation to buildings to achieve an innovation credit: please see Inquiry Number 0121-IDc11-092801. To summarize the earlier ruling, your project must be ACTIVELY instructional by including two of the three following elements: 1) comprehensive signage program to educate; 2) manual, guideline or case study to inform the design of other projects; 3) educational outreach program or guided tour focusing on sustainable living. As outlined in your inquiry, most of these elements are planned or already incorporated into the program in a very comprehensive way that reaches across many credit categories. Rather than focusing on a sustainable building education program as described in the previous inquiries, this project could focus on a sustainable site educational program that highlights green features throughout, as suggested in your narrative. You must be vigilant in your documentation of the measures described and provide adequate photos/drawings and other documentation along with narratives explaining your intent, the requirements, the submittals and the design approach, as directed in the Reference Guide. The opportunity to achieve innovation credits is designed for just such projects that either lie outside the existing LEED credits or exemplify exceptional performance in sustainability.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/19/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We recognize that ID credits cannot be granted achievement via the CIR process, but request the review of this proposed approach for viability to support a project earning an ID credit by meeting these requirements. Please provide insight as to the type & level of documentation required to pursue such an ID credit. Title Pursuit of Company\'s Mission Zero objectives through the application of sustainability programs to new building construction and operation. Credit Intent To incorporate the building into the Owner\'s Company Mission Zero objectives, the new facility has been designed & will be operated under the site\'s ISO systems. This includes the application of the Owner\'s unique corporate programs; QUEST, EcoSense and Ecometrics, to ensure the new facility is operated to high standards of sustainable practice. These proprietary programs form part of the Owner\'s Mission Zero program to reduce the footprint of a manufacturing facility to a virtual zero point by 2020. The project is the first in Asia to operate under such programs, covering all aspects of waste, materials & utility reduction as well as addressing less tangible social aspects of sustainability. Credit Requirements Consideration of the requirements of operating the new facility under the Company\'s Mission Zero programs has been applied in a holistic manner to the design. The choice of pursuing the LEED certification for the building was a key aspect of this approach, other considerations were the overall building design to incorporate a natural ventilation system, submetering of utilities, drainage system, improved staff facilities, etc Project Approach The building & all operations will be under the company\'s ISO systems and Mission Zero initiatives. These programs have been operating since 1998 for the current factory. The programs to be applied under Mission Zero are: ISO9000 Internationally recognized Quality Assurance program ISO14000 Internationally recognized environmental management system where all environmental aspects are encompassed, managed for environmental responsibility, audited & verified. The management system is used to administer all the sub-programs as follows: Ecometrics Comprehensive monitoring of the utilities / materials usage of activities in the facility & relating these to output of the plant. The program facilitates benchmarking, driving & verify of results in the pursuit of the Mission Zero goal. It is utilized to drive, monitor & demonstrate reduction in resource usage for the output of the operation and target of reducing the footprint of the operation to virtually zero by 2020. Materials usage & percentage recycled content Utility Usage & percentage renewable usage Waste generated & percentage recycled Transportation Energy costs QUEST System of financial accounting of the waste reduction programs which operates from a benchmark point to reduce costs of waste by 10% per annum The program monitors performance in the following areas Internal Off-Quality External Off-Quality Correction Costs Process Waste Material Usage Variances Energy Costs - Renewable / Nonrenewable Inventory Losses Packaging Costs Non-Quality related correction costs EcoSense A program to drive less measurable but important aspects of sustainability addressing areas such as Operation to recognized Quality & Environmental standards (ISO9000 & ISO 14000) Sustainability Awareness of Shareholders; Employees, Customers, Suppliers, Neighbors Safety standard improvements Transportation impacts - commuting/business travel/supply chain Sociometrics - monitoring of the efforts to improve the social aspects of sustainability Waste & Energy Reduction Projects - encouraging both large & small scale improvement projects to reduce Emissions Reduction - auditing of all facility emissions Life Cycle Assessment programs The intent of all of these company initiatives area a comprehensive strategy w/ triple bottom line quantifiable benefits beyond the manufacturing industry standard - documentation of metric results are available for all of these programs.

Ruling:

It is not clear how the requirements outlined in the proposal demonstrate quantitative environmental benefits beyond the requirements set by the LEED NC Rating System, and thus do not qualify for an innovation credit. Green strategies related to operations and maintenance policies are addressed through the LEED EB Rating System. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
3/21/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 296,000 sf medical center. We are requesting consideration and guidance for a potential Innovation and Design point for the inclusion of a Healing Garden and Outdoor Place of Respite in the design of the building and site. Using criteria from the Green Guide to Healthcare Guideline system we have created a Healing Garden on site that provides patients, visitors, and staff accessible outdoor Places of Respite that takes into account: security and safety, supervised, sun orientation and other microclimatic factors, direct connection to the natural environment and garden spaces, noise of mechanical equipment, accessibility, way finding and orientation, strength and stamina of patients, activity and interest, privacy and security and proximity to building entries and restrooms. The Garden also provides choices and variety in the design of spaces, engaging the senses of sight, sound, touch, smell and is integrated with native plantings and garden elements. The intent of the garden is to provide places for quiet reflection that assist in the process of healing of patients and provide for the physical, emotional and spiritual well being of all users. The garden is sized appropriately to meet the needs of patients. Interior lobbies and public spaces adjacent to the garden space allow for viewing of the garden in passing throughout the day as well as during inclement weather. A growing body of research shows that patients, medical staff and other care givers experience positive health benefits from access to daylight, landscape views and garden spaces. Providing a variety of spaces for people to pause and experience their natural surroundings is an important design and whole-healthcare objective. The spaces are universally accessible and provide a variety of seating areas for both ambulatory and wheelchair users. Suggested Documentation includes: Area Tabulations and ratios that show: - Net program summary. - Site Plan(s) highlighting public outdoor places of respite equal to 5% min. of project net program area. - Floor Plans and site plans highlighting indoor and outdoor places of respite dedicated for staff/occupants use equal to an additional 2% of project net program area. - Garden Plans and sections illustrating orientation, accessibility, proximity to interior services, Plant material types and quantities, hardscape material types, textures, etc.

Ruling:

Although Innovation in Design credits are not awarded through the CIR process, the proposed strategy is similar to LEED for Healthcare SSc9.1 Places of Respite. An innovation credit would be considered based on the requirements of this LEED credit. In addition to the requirements outlined in the inquiry above, please note that there are some additional requirements under LEED for Healthcare. For the complete credit requirements, please see http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=3468.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
3/11/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are seeking an Innovation in Design credit for the use of low-emitting insulation material. Intent Reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, potentially irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and wellbeing of installers and occupants. Requirements All insulation used in the building interior (defined as inside of the weatherproofing system) shall meet one of the testing and production requirements below: Option A: California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for The Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scaled Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda. OR Option B: GREENGUARD Children & Schools Certification (requirements are more stringent than those set forth by the Cal DHS Standard Practice for Testing of VOCs from Building Materials Using Small-Scaled Environmental Chambers) Submittals Provide the LEED-CI Letter Template, signed by the architect, interior designer or responsible party, listing all the insulation used in the tenant space and stating that they meet or exceed the applicable testing and product requirements. Background The basis for our request is that within LEED for Homes MRc2.2 Insulation is awarded 0.5 points if it complies with California Practice for Testing of VOCs from Building Materials Using Small Chambers. The effective use of insulation to minimize energy costs and improve control of environmental comfort with placement in the walls and above drop- ceilings of high-performance buildings has led to insulation being a highly utilized individual material in many LEED-CI buildings. Therefore, now more than ever, the assurance that insulation is not off-gassing harmful chemicals is an important step in assuring the health of all building occupants. Insulation is listed as one of a three component system under Option 6 - Ceiling and Wall Systems (LEED for Schools EQc4). We are proposing to have insulation identified as a stand-alone material due to its abundant use within a building. It is understood that LEED for Schools EQc4 allows up to 4 points for low-emitting materials. It is requested that insulation, by itself, as allowed in LEED for Homes MRc2.2 be eligible as an ID credit. To be consistent, this would be an option only if the project has not already received 4 points for low-emitting materials.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting confirmation that an innovation credit can be awarded for projects using building insulation that meets the California Practice for Testing of VOCs from Building Materials Using Small Chambers and/or is GREENGUARD Children & Schools certified. This strategy is acceptable for projects when the LEED project scope includes the installation of all roof, floor and wall insulation, and where all building insulation meets the indicated criteria. For CI projects where any roof, floor, or wall insulation is installed outside of the LEED project scope, and where all building insulation meets the indicated criteria, this strategy is only acceptable under SS Credit 1, Option L: Other Quantifiable Environmental Performance.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/8/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The purpose of this CIR is to request approval for one ID credit for an innovative approach to material reduction by using QuietRock soundproof drywall in lieu of multiple layers of traditional drywall. INTENT: To minimize the total quantity of new gypsum wallboard (drywall) used in acoustically sensitive buildings through accurate performance specifications, enhanced materials, and efficient design. The innovative approach will be applied to walls and partitions specified as acoustically high performance for interoffice privacy and/or noise control (sound transmission class 50 or higher). In some cases, a single layer of soundproof drywall can be used to replace up to five layers of traditional drywall. This product and design approach will result in a significant reduction in the total embodied energy of the materials used in the building. (The BEES software from NIST has reported that a single panel of drywall represents between 150,000 to 300,000 Btu\'s of embodied energy). REQUIREMENT: Minimize amount of building materials used by designing walls meeting the sound isolation requirement with QuietRock soundproof drywall. Demonstrate at least a 20% savings in the quantity of gypsum wallboard used compared to the baseline design using conventional, techniques and materials. SUBMITTALS: Architectural plans, details and specifications, a letter signed by the architect or acoustical engineer outlining the acoustical performance requirements identified in the design, the measures implemented in the approach, photographs of soundproofing measures under construction, bills of sale of soundproofing drywall materials purchased, and calculations demonstrating at least a 20% savings in the quantity of drywall used compared with conventional, baseline construction techniques and materials. DESIGN APPROACH: For a two-story multi-purpose commercial building, areas of the floor plan require additional noise control (due to amplified lecture halls or private workspaces). Well established performance specifications required that these walls perform to an STC 50 or higher. These partitions have been designed using QuietRock, an innovative soundproof drywall, so that an over 20% material reduction is achieved. The process was as follows: 1. All walls with a sound isolation requirement have been reviewed by a qualified professional to assess/confirm minimum performance requirements and alternate, material-optimized assemblies were recommended. 2. Acoustical walls requiring multiple layers of gypsum drywall have been redesigned using layer(s) of soundproof drywalls in their place. 3. Architectural details have been added that address acoustical seal and closure best practices for optimal sound isolation. 4. Per CIR 12/6/2002 and 1/9/2003, the basic steps for Boeing to achieve an ID Credit for Material Reduction will be: - Provide documentation, such as a narrative and drawings, to prove on the validity of the baseline to which the project is compared. - Provide a convincing and thorough analysis of this condition by a knowledgeable professional, such as an acoustical engineer or an architect. - The actual bill of materials purchased and a spreadsheet comparing quantities & costs. - A letter signed by a responsible party enumerating and certifying the product and building methods. Should this credit be audited, the applicant also should be prepared to provide photographs of the soundproof wallboard installation in the field.

Ruling:

It should be noted that innovation credits can not be awarded in the CIR process. The approach with one material is not enough to warrant an ID credit. If the project team can submit a holistic approach which includes walls, ceilings, etc., we would consider granting an ID credit. Please note that USGBC does not certify, endorse or promote any products, services or companies, nor do we track, list or report data related to products and their environmental qualities. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/29/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Title: Educational Outreach Program Intent: To broaden the public\'s knowledge and awareness of green building strategies from a lessons learned perspective and to use the facility as a full scale example. The intent of the design team is to submit for an Innovation and Design Credit for an Educational Outreach Program. The project is a Car Wash & Maintenance Facility (hereafter referred to as the Facility) for a major Metropolitan Transit Agency. Due to the nature of the Facility the building is not generally open to the public. Use of the facility is limited to staff and organized visitations, thus onsite general public education would not be lucrative. Instead of an onsite educational program the Agency has accomplished / will be accomplishing the following: Educational Outreach: Project was featured in the Agency\'s "Going Green" brochure that was distributed on Earth Day. The use of captured rain water at the new Facility was a component of the Agency\'s "Earth Day" car posters distributed throughout the car fleet. The Agency\'s web site prominently features the Facility and has an animation of the Car Washer showing the captured / recycled rain water feature. Also, this website has recently been upgraded, as required by an Executive Order of the Governor, to be "accessible" to the hearing/visually impaired. Educational flyers on the Building will be available at the main lobby to visitors. Presentations: Presented a paper on the project at the Railroad Environmental Conference at UIUC in 2002. (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) "Green" features of the new Maintenance Facility and Car Washer were part of the Transit Agency\'s "Building for Tomorrow" brochure and presentation at the UITP Conference on Sustainable Design. This was also presented at the APTA conference on the environment given in NYC. Tours: A delegation from MetroVal (Valencia Metro, Venezuela) went on a tour through the facility. There are also additional plans for a group of engineering students from Colombia University to tour the Facility. Awards: Applied for and received a "Green Apple" award (honorable mention) from NYC/DOB and the US-EPA for Green Building Design. Design Guidelines: Established Design Guidelines for "Sustainability" for implementation throughout the Capital Program that were a direct result of the Green Design efforts on this project. We propose to submit copies of all the brochures created as part of this outreach program as well as website information for viewing. This project is not the typical project for which LEED NC was originally designed. As a major Metropolitan Transit Agency - the project is very high profile and thus contributes to the expansion of green building into the mainstream. As such, we feel that these efforts should obtain an Innovation & Design credit. Please let us know if these efforts will garner us an additional credit and if not, what we may do to accomplish this under this specific type of facility and ownership. Additionally, we would also like to know what submittals will be necessary to establish sufficient evidentiary information for the USGBC review.

Ruling:

Your education and outreach program is eligible for an innovation point. It meets the general requirements established in the credit ruling dated 9/24/01. To document these strategies in your LEED certification submittal, please include the information from your CIR narrative and provide a copy of the Design Guidelines for Sustainability and other materials. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/2/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 26,000 square foot tenant space for a confidential client, a news provider. We will be utilizing LEED-CI. We\'re wondering if our limited-wall office space qualifies for an Innovation Credit. The space plan for the office will not include walls/partitions. The entire space will utilize an open office furniture system. Obviously there will be walls for restrooms and mechanical spaces but private offices and kitchen areas will not have hard walls. Intent Minimize materials and construction waste due by avoiding the construction of walls for private offices and kitchen area. Requirements We will calculate the amount of material (gypsum, metal studs etc.) our project will save (as well as construction waste avoided) based on the assumption that other offices similar to ours consist of 25% hardwalled areas. We will quantify the amount of CO2 saved from the extraction, manufacturing, and shipping of material which we will be saving by not constructing any hard walls.

Ruling:

The applicant is proposing an innovation in design credit for limiting constructed walls within a 26,000 square foot tenant space. While space planning such as this has clear advantages, it is simply good facilities management practice where "churn" is inevitable. The proposed strategy, while laudable, does not warrant the award of an innovation credit. Please refer to IDc1.2 CIR ruling dated 11/3/2006. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/23/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a three story laboratory facility in the city of Port St. Lucie Florida. The project has used an exterior coating system with a higher heat reflectance value than the values of conventional coatings. This credit interpretation request is to inquire about submitting the coating system used, to apply for a credit for reduced heat island effect for non-roof surfaces. The Total Solar Reflectance (TSR) values of the exterior coatings used in the building were tested using a D&S reflectometer according to ASTM C1549-04. The TSR value of the BML-01 "White" color used was 82.9% and the TSR value for the PPG522-3 "Water Chestnut" color used was 74.5%. To prove merit for one point under LEED, we have followed the guidelines of the LEED reference guide to document Sustainable Sites Credit 7.1-Heat island effect non-roof. The baseline case and design case were calculated using the exterior wall surface area and 50% of the site hardscape area. The baseline case was calculated using 43.7% solar reflectance for conventional beige paint to match the color used in the building and 35% for new gray concrete hardscape. The design case was calculated using 74.5% solar reflectance for the Water Chestnut coating used and 5% for new asphalt hardscape. Using Ecotect and site specific data the building was modeled with the correct north orientation. Ecotect calculated the incident solar radiation that strikes the north, south, east and west walls, and the hardscape surfaces annually in Wh. The incident solar radiation value for the four facades and the hardscape were added, and multiplied by the solar reflectance values to determine the site reflected solar energy. The analysis showed that 61% of solar energy would have been reflected using conventional paint and new gray concrete, but instead we are reflecting 77% of the total solar energy incident on the site using a coating with a higher heat reflectance value. We would like to know if this approach of using exterior coatings with higher reflectance values to lower heat island effect on non-roof surfaces will be acceptable to document one innovation in design point.

Ruling:

The project is proposing to earn an innovation point for using high heat reflectance value exterior wall surfaces. Please note that Innovation & Design points are not awarded through the CIR process. As described, this approach is not eligible for an ID credit at this time. Currently, no standard methodology, metric, or baseline assessment exists for exterior wall heat island effect reduction. The proposed methodology (EcoTect modeling), metric (solar reflectance), and baseline do not address heat island effect reduction as currently outlined in the LEED Rating System (using solar reflectance index - SRI). Furthermore, as this proposal is suggesting a modified exemplary performance compliance path, the requirements of SSc7.1 would first need to be met. Based on the details provided above, it is not clear if SSc7.1 would be achieved. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/24/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Green Building Educational Component This project intends to provide a two-part educational package as part of its process. This will consist of the following: 1. A display system comprised of small iconographic signs throughout the facility highlighting where green strategies have been employed. These icons will then be complemented by a display panel in the main cafeteria space which highlights what the green building strategies are, and some of the impacts. Rather than put text-based signs throughout the facility, the icons will remind people as they move through the space that there is something green there. All employees go to the cafeteria several times a day, and this way the centralized panel can highlight the environmental impact of each piece of the building. For example an icon at the parking lot can highlight how much the hybrid vehicle parking spaces are reducing emissions. An icon at the toilet rooms can highlight how many gallons of water are going to be saved each year. By having the icons spread throughout the facility we can illustrate how pervasive our green strategies are. 2. A case study book or website, tied in to graphics of the building, which will highlight materials and strategies used throughout the facility. It will be cross-referenced with synergistic efforts made in the owner\'s corporate office center, also under construction and also seeking LEED certification. This resource will include both materials used, design strategies employed, and local suppliers and professionals involed in the project, such as construction entities, local waste recyclers, etc. This case study book or website will be shared with the USGBC and the Pittsburgh Green Building Alliance (GBA). Please review and let us know if this approach will meet the intent of the CIR from 9/24/2001 regarding educational programs for Innovation in Design points, and whether this approach is likely to be awarded a point if submitted.

Ruling:

To meet the requirements for an innovation credit for education, as outlined in previous CIR rulings, signage must be built into the building\'s spaces and comprehensively addresses the green building strategies employed in the project. A case study must inform the design of other buildings based on the success of this project. The strategies described meet this intent. Credits are not awarded through the CIR process and achievement will be based on the documents formally submitted. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/3/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

LEED CI Version 2.0 does not address energy associated with domestic water heaters. (water heaters are not rated by energy star and are not part of HVAC in EAc1.3) Our CI project is a laboratory and preliminary energy models indicate the domestic water heating energy could be as much as the lighting energy. Lighting energy is allotted several points under EAc1.1. We propose the following innovation point: Intent: Achieve increasing levels of energy conservation beyond the prerequisite standard. Requirements: Increase water heater efficiency to 85% or higher (when the ASHRAE 90.1-2004 mandatory value is 80%) Submittals: Provide cut sheets of all water heaters indicating they are greater than 85% efficient Please let us know if this approach seems acceptable for an innovation point.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting approval of a proposed Innovation in Design (ID) credit for energy savings associated with water heaters. Commercial water heaters are currently not rated by the EnergyStar system and, therefore until such time, residential water heater efficiency may be included in the calculations for EAc1.4. To be eligible for an ID credit, calculations should show a minimum of 15% reduction in domestic hot water energy use over code. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/22/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Title: Whole Building Double Water Filtration to Obviate the Need for Bottled Water Intent: To minimize or eliminate the use of plastic water bottles in buildings by providing the purity levels afforded by bottled water through comprehensive building water filtration. The bottled water industry has grown substantially in the past decade. About 74% of Americans drink bottled water; one in five drinks only bottled. Demand is outstripping recycling capacity. According to the Container Recycling Institute, each year an ever smaller proportion of plastic bottles are recycled; from 2 out of 5 in the mid \'90s, to only 1 out of 7 today. Seventy million water bottles are disposed of each day, with 60 million going into landfills, oceans or incinerators. Our project plans to implement a two-stage water filtration system that provides water purity equal to or better than bottled water. Implementing water filtration technology is an answer to the severe environmental impact of bottled water, because it reconciles people\'s desire for pure, safe drinking water with the imperative of reducing waste. By installing two-stage water filtration - first at the main (point-of-entry, POE) and then downstream within kitchen cabinets (point-of-use, POU) -- and educating our occupants about the health and environmental advantages of the system, we anticipate a dramatic reduction in the purchase of bottled water in our building and associated waste. The two-stage configuration, and the specific equipment selected, are designed so as to minimize environmental impact by 1) at POE using negligible water for self-cleaning, and 2) at POU achieving significant filter cartridge longevity. Requirements: - Provide building-wide point-of-entry water filtration that removes particulate contamination equal to or smaller than 10 microns; AND - Provide point-of-use water filtration at 0.2 micron (fine enough to remove bacteria) and NSF/ANSI Standard 42 and 53 certified. AND - Educate building occupants about the system, how it works and its substantial environmental benefits. Benefits: - Obviate the need for bottled water by providing high performance and low impact two-stage water filtration that will substantially reduce the amount of plastic water bottles going to waste from our building. - Reduce the exposure to potentially harmful waterborne contaminants for the entire population through universal access to filtered water. - Reduce the energy required to heat water by screening out particulates that over time negatively impact system efficiency. - Reduce the amount of pollutants released in the manufacture and transportation of bottled water attributable to our building. There are 70 million bottles of water consumed in the US per day. Dividing that number by the total population of approximately 306,000,000, means that 23% of the US population is drinking one bottle of water a day. We believe this estimate to be conservative and that widespread adoption of two-stage water filtration could have a much bigger impact, especially in areas with known water quality problems. We estimate that our 1200 apartment project will have 2130 occupants. Therefore, 23% of 2130 = 479 people drinking one bottle of water a day times 365 days/yr = 174,835 bottles for this one building resulting in a reduction of 149,858 (6 out of 7) bottles going to landfill, oceans or incineration. New occupants will be given an orientation session at the time of lease by the property manager explaining the dual system, the POU maintenance requirements and why the cost and environmental impact of bottled water can be avoided in the building. The tenant environmental guideline will also detail the environmental impact of bottled water and describe the system benefits and performance. The filtration system will be a highlighted feature on all leasing and green building tours.

Ruling:

Installation of a water filtration system, with the intent of eliminating the use of plastic water bottles is an acceptable effort for achieving an Innovation in Design credit, as long as calculations and policy/program descriptions are provided as required by posted CIR ruling dated 11/15/2007, showing the quantifiable benefits that may result from the reduction of waste and transportation. Please provide the policy/program document which details the environmental impact of bottled water use and describes the system benefits and performance. Policy/program descriptions must also confirm that the building?provided filtered water will be available at 100% of kitchen sinks throughout the building, and that maintenance of all filtration system components and point?of?use filter replacement will be provided by the building owner per manufacturer\'s guidelines. For core and shell projects, these requirements will need to be part of a legally binding agreement with the tenants, such as a tenant lease or sales agreement. As part of the program/policy document project team will be required to outline an orientation program to educate building occupants about this sustainable feature of the building and the expected use of filtered water from sinks instead of bottled water; consider adding other green features on the building to this orientation. Documentation of the filtration system, education policy, and sales or lease agreement will need to be provided for certification. ***This CIR Ruling has been updated on 9/14/2009*** Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/19/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 320,000 s.f. mixed-use project being designed and constructed to achieve various LEED NC 2.2 credits. The mixed use components consist of residential units, residential parking and commercial tenant space (shell only). The project is located in Solano County, CA. We are seeking an innovation credit for a Comprehensive Transportation plan based on the ID credit previously approved on 5/9/2003 The INTENT of this innovation credit is to provide occupants of the building additional options for Alternative Transportation and reduce the drive alone trips through the use of a Transportation Management Plan. The project is currently pursuing three SS 4 baseline credits including: a. Project is located within 1/4 mile of Bus service. b. Bicycle Storage is provided for residents and retail customers and employees. c. Preferred Parking is provided for low emitting/ fuel efficient vehicles . The Comprehensive Transportation Plan will include the following additional elements: a. The developer will provide free conferencing facilities to accommodate flexible work schedules and reduce the drive alone trips. A conference room with infrastructure for video conferencing/ telecommuting will be provided for use by residents. b. The Solano County Transportation Authority provides a number of transportation amenities/ alternates for its residents and information on the same will be displayed in the lobby and included in the Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions. Information and amenities include: i. Maps/ schedules/ contact info for Public Transportation ii. Information on incentives provided by Solana County Transportation Authority including: 1. Emergency Ride Home Program 2. "Bucks for Bikes" program (Up to 60% -$100 max of the cost of a bicycle) 3. Commuter Check Program 4. Carpool/ Vanpool incentives (Up to $100 Gas Card) c. The developer will provide 10 free bicycles for the use of residents. Bicycle maintenance and replacement will subsequently be part of the Home Owner\'s Association Submittals will include a. A floor plan showing conferencing facility within residential development. b. Copy of CCRs outlining available public transportation amenities. c. Commitment letter or receipt from developer for 10 bicycles.

Ruling:

This CIR is requesting that the project\'s listed transportation management measures be evaluated for compliance with an innovation in design credit. Innovation credits are awarded during the certification process, not through the CIR process. This ruling is provided as guidance about the likely outcome if accomplishments are proven by the certification submittals. The project is likely to be awarded the credit if the following items are clearly documented: 1) Achievement of SSc4.1, 4.2, and 4.4. 2) Access to the on-site workspace for all occupants for at least five years. 3) Construction and maintenance of the transportation information kiosk, including information on: rideshares, commuter checks, local transit options, and guaranteed ride home programs for at least five years. 4) Bike purchase or subsidies for 5 years, or 50 bicycles, whichever comes first. This ruling assumes that the mixed use project is essentially residential for the purposes of the credit. Per the SSc4.4 CIR ruling of 4/4/2005, the project is considered residential if the commercial square footage is less than 10% of the entire building. For further reference, a number of transportation management compliance strategies have been outlined in the "Innovation in Design Credit Catalog" available at http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=3569 in addition to the precedent identified in the CIR ruling of 5/9/2003 cited. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/23/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following proposed innovation in design credit language is intended to demonstrate accomplishment of Comprehensive Formaldehyde Reduction above and beyond requirements set forth in existing LEED credits. We recognize that an ID credit cannot be granted achievement through the CIR process, but request the review of this proposed approach for viability and appropriateness as written to support a project earning an ID credit by meeting these requirements. Proposed Title: Comprehensive Formaldehyde Reduction Intent: Provide a safe and healthy environment for both construction teams and building occupants. Requirements: Meet the requirements of existing LEED credits associated with formaldehyde reduction AND comply with the additional measures outlined below in order to obtain a comprehensive formaldehyde reduction in the building. To accomplish this, the following are required: ? Specify low formaldehyde emitting products/appliances for each of the following if/as incorporated in the project: o Composite wood and agrifiber- meet LEED-NC EQc4.4 credit requirements o Formaldehyde free insulation ? Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control- meet LEED EQp2 credit requirements ? Thermal Comfort: Design- meet LEED-NC EQc7.1 credit requirements Submittal: In addition to all corresponding submittal requirements for existing LEED credits, document specific efforts to reduce formaldehyde, and describe how a comprehensive formaldehyde reduction throughout the building that address control and mitigation has been realized. Design Approach: ? Source Control: minimize formaldehyde sources from being introduced to the building interior ? Mitigation: maintain indoor air quality with low formaldehyde presence ? Identify sources of formaldehyde within the building design above and beyond insulation, and specify low formaldehyde or formaldehyde free alternatives. ? Consider appropriateness and occupant need for mechanical and/or natural ventilation while evaluating site conditions and building design. Avoid venting to areas of heavy traffic, nearby polluting industries and neighboring waste management sites. ? Minimal use of foamed in place insulation ? Wash durable-press fabrics before installation (e.g.: drapes) ? Systems furniture and seating- meet LEED-CI EQc4.5 credit requirements ? Increased ventilation- meet LEED-NC EQc2 credit requirements ? Maintain moderate temperature and humidity levels o Controllability of systems: Thermal Comfort- meet LEED-NC EQc6.2 credit requirements ? Minimize gases from combustion sources from entering interior spaces o Combustion venting- meet LEED-H IEQc2 credit requirements o Vehicles emissions protection- meet LEED-H IEQc10 credit requirements ? Monitor air quality o Outdoor air delivery monitoring- meet LEED-NC EQc1 credit requirements o Install formaldehyde sensor

Ruling:

The proposed requirements for an ID credit related to formaldehyde would not justify achievement of an ID credit. The proposed requirements add insulation to the materials regulated in EQc4.4 and require simultaneous achievement of a prerequisite (EQp2) and EQc7.1. These proposed requirements do not represent a comprehensive approach to control of formaldehyde contents and emissions. Items mentioned in the "Design Approach" do, however, represent potential ID credits. For example, projects may earn an ID credit for using systems furniture and seating that meets LEED-CI EQc4.5. Also, an enhanced indoor air quality monitoring system that includes formaldehyde and other VOC measurements may justify an ID credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/30/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent: "To provide design teams and projects the opportunity to be awarded points for exemplary performance above the requirements set by LEED-CS Green Building Rating System and/or innovative performance in Green Building categories not specifically addressed by the LEED-CS Green Building Rating System." We are presenting this CIR in order to receive guidance about the likely outcome of the proposed Innovation Credit if accomplishments are proven by the certification submittals. INTENT To educate tenants on lifestyle changes that can improve their physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing; build a sense of community; enhance the work environment; and promote alternative modes of transportation. REQUIREMENTS Provide tenants with access to a Working Well Program (WWP) for a minimum of three years. Provide a WWP coordinator on site three days per week. He/she shall be responsible for; organizing all activities, marketing events, conducting monthly special events, and recruiting other wellness experts as required, preparing regular reports for evaluation by management and an annual executive summary highlighting participation and tenant feedback, and delivering a wellness activities plan to the tenants on a monthly basis. SUBMITTALS Provide the letter template signed by the developer declaring that a WWP coordinator has been engaged for a minimum of three years. Provide a copy of the agreement between the Developer and WWP coordinator demonstrating that the Program will be provided for at least three years. If an audit is requested during the certification process: Provide a copy of the annual activity plan, including a brief description of each event and schedule. Provide a copy of tenant agreement sections or information package outlining the structure and costs of the WWP available to the tenant. DESIGN STRATEGIES The Program will serve to educate employees on the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Seminars and activities should be used to promote alternative modes of transportation such as walking and cycling for increased fitness and reduced pollution. The public transportation and bicycle storage and shower facilities available to tenants will be promoted through the WWP, thus increasing their use and furthering the intent of the Sustainable Sites credits. The health and wellness information and activities should be selected such that they increase productivity through improved morale, reduced sick-time, and reduced workplace injuries. Communication between the WWP Coordinator and the Tenant should be ongoing to assess the demand for certain activities and information sessions to increase employee involvement. A tenant representative should be appointed to ensure that the needs of the tenant are being met by the WWP. Environmentally-friendly activities should be emphasized and specialists in sustainable living should be included in the education aspect of the Program. Sample WWP activities and features include:

Ruling:

The applicant is asking whether the proposed Working Well program is likely to be accepted as an innovation credit. Although innovation credits are not awarded through the CIR process, this proposal does not provide adequate justification of the environmental benefits of the program, and the human health benefits do not directly relate to the design, construction or operations of the building, which are the focus of the LEED-CS rating system. As stated in the CIR, the program is provided as an option for all tenants - there is no requirement or guarantee that any will participate. Further, the benefits of alternative transportation are already awarded through existing SSc4 credits. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following Innovation & Design CIR is being submitted to assess whether the following criteria could qualify for an ID credit if all standards are met and documentation received: Intent - To provide a mechanism to support novel ideas to improve the environment at Union College. Through a competitive grant-based initiative, members of the Union College community have access to a $16,000 per year pool of funding to either make Union operations more sustainable or to conduct research that will make specific contributions to sustainability at the regional, national or global scale. Grant proposals are required to detail rationale, a project/research plan, anticipated outcome, detailed budget, and timeline, and are rated based on the benefit to environmental sustainability and feasibility. In the 2008-2009 academic year, ten different projects proposed by students, staff and faculty were awarded between $500 and $2000. With the opening of a new USustain headquarters located in Wold Science Center, the office of President Stephen Ainlay has committed to funding for two more academic years. Projects that directly impact the design and operations of the Wold Science Center or research projects that would be undertaken at the Wold Science Center will be especially encouraged. Requirement - Union will support grassroots sustainability ideas for the period 2009-2011. Supported projects will include specific reporting guidelines and communication procedures. The period of funding shall cover a period of no less than two academic years, for a total monetary amount of $48,000. Submittals - Presidential Green Grant RFP (Sept. 2008); Summaries of 2008-2009 proposals funded by Presidential Green Grants.

Ruling:

The innovation credit is based on the merits of the Union College providing funding in support of grassroots sustainability ideas that can impact the operations of the Union, or support research that contributes to sustainability at the regional, national or global scale. While the grant program is clearly focused on environmental issues and is commendable, it is unclear how this directly correlates to the design, construction or operations of the LEED project itself. It should be noted that for the LEED for New Construction rating system, innovation credits are awarded for green building strategies (not covered in the rating system) that demonstrate a comprehensive approach with significant, measurable environmental benefits. If the grant program was specifically (and only) focused on making the operations of the LEED project more sustainable, it may be possible to earn an innovation credit if specific measures were adopted based on the LEED for Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance rating system for example. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/9/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

EDITED 5/7/07 to include CSI Masterformat 1995 Division 12 in calculations. INQUIRY: In an effort to help stimulate the development of environmentally focused product evaluation and certification tools for use by building professionals, USGBC is seeking to establish an innovation point for specification of products certified under the Cradle to Cradle (C2C) program. This program is explained at http://www.mbdc.com/certified.html. C2C Certification provides manufacturers with a means to measure achievement in environmentally intelligent design and helps customers purchase and specify products that are pursuing a broader definition of quality. Through C2C, this means using environmentally safe and healthy materials; design for material reutilization, such as recycling or composting; energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy; efficient use of water, and maximum water quality associated with production; and instituting strategies for social responsibility. If a candidate product achieves the necessary criteria, it is certified as a Silver, Gold or Platinum product or as a Technical/Biological Nutrient (available for homogeneous materials or less complex products), and can be labeled as Cradle to Cradle. USGBC suggests the following Intent, Requirements and Submittals for this Innovation in Design application: Intent: Help stimulate the development of environmentally focused product evaluation and certification tools for use by building professionals. Requirements: Use Cradle to Cradle Certified building materials and products for 2.5% of the total value of all building materials and products used in the project, based on cost. The "cost value" of products for the purposes of this calculation will be discounted by 50% for Silver level products and those identified only as "technical or biological nutrients", and doubled for products certified at the platinum level: Cost value of products = ((Silver & nutrients) x 0.5) + Gold + (Platinum x 2) Submittals: Spreadsheet matrix with the following information: DEFAULT MATERIALS VALUE Total construction costs (hard costs for CSI Master Format 1995 Divisions 2-10 and 12** only): _______ Default materials cost (total Divisions 2-10 and 12** construction cost x 0.45): _______ OR ACTUAL MATERIALS VALUE Actual materials cost (excluding labor and equipment) hard costs for CSI Master Format 1995 Divisions 2-10 and 12** only): _______ - Material Name/Description - Manufacturer - Total Material Cost ($) - Percent Of Product C2C Certified (% by Weight) - Compliant Product Value - Adjusted value (Silver and nutrients x 0.5, Platinum x2) Total "cost value" ($) of C2C certified materials: _______ C2C certified material value as a percentage of total materials cost*: _______ *To qualify for this ID credit the percentage of C2C certified materials must be at least 2.5% of the total materials cost **CSI Master Format 1995 Division 12 may be included in calculations if materials from Division 12 are used consistently with calculations in credits MRc3-7 in LEED-NC or MRc3-6 in LEED-CS. LEED-CI projects are required to include Division 12 components in the calculation of this ID point, as these components are required for calculations in CI credits MRc4-7. Please refer to the LEED-CI Reference Guide\'s credit calculation instructions for guidance in calculating these credits.

Ruling:

RULING by the MR TAG (April 6, 2007): The MR Technical Advisory Group has determined that the proposal encourages innovation through product improvement and is thus acceptable for an innovation point, given proper documentation upon LEED application. In approving this proposal, the TAG notes the following: 1) The TAG has concerns about the lack of transparency in the C2C certification process; 2) There are other product evaluation and certification tools that may be considered for similar acknowledgment through the CIR process; 3) The TAG and others intend to work towards establishing a set of criteria for product evaluation and certification tools that are referenced in LEED, whether in innovation points or in rating system credit language; and 4) Once those criteria have been established, it will be necessary to revisit whether or not proposed innovation points based on this draft language should continue to be approved.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can a project earn ID credit for being in a LEED ND neighborhood? What level of certification or stage or review must the project have completed?

Ruling:

Yes, a project can earn ID credit for being in a LEED for Neighborhood Development certified project. The LEED-ND project must be certified, not just registered. LEED-ND projects at any certification level (Certified through Platinum) and any stage of certification (Stage 1, 2, or 3) are eligible.
**Update October 1, 2013 - The ruling below is no longer valid for project registered after 7/1/2013. As many prerequisites and credits within LEED-ND and LEED-NC address similar concepts, simply locating a NC project within LEED-ND neighborhood is not considered innovative and in some cases, can lead to double-counting the use of the same strategy in both Rating Systems.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/20/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The goal of this CIR request is to confirm that it is viable for a project filing under LEED-NC v.2.2 to look to credits and credit requirements under LEED-EB v.2.0 (specifically three credits under the heading of Building Operation & Maintenance) as the basis of one of its ID credits. Specifically, a large private university in the mid-west has a growing commitment to sustainability and green design. It is currently constructing several new dormitories and student support/activity spaces (5 buildings total) which are targeting LEED-NC v. 2.2 Silver at a minimum. This university realizes that sustainable practices don\'t end when construction of these new dormitories and buildings is complete and they receive their LEED certification. Consistent with their plans to use the LEED for Existing Buildings program in the future to enhance campus operations and maintenance of buildings, this university plans to extend sustainable practices into the life and maintenance of these new dormitories and student support/activity buildings by adapting "appropriate operations and maintenance of buildings and building systems so that they continue to deliver target building performance goals over the long term." (LEED for Existing Buildings v 2.0 Reference Guide, page 213.) Also important, this university is looking to its experiences building and implementing a long-term Building Operation and Maintenance Plan at these new dormitories and student support/activity buildings as a test case for all five of its campuses. Basis of Building Operation & Maintenance at these new Dormitories and Student Support/Activity Buildings: This university looks to LEED-EB v. 2.0 for the basic standards in it Building Operations and Maintenance Program: Specifically: 1. LEED-EB, v 2.0 EA Credit 3.1: Building Operation & Maintenance, Staff Education; 2. LEED-EB, v2.0 EA Credit 3.2: Building Operation & Maintenance, Building Systems Maintenance; and 3. LEED-EB, v2.0 EA Credit 3.3: Building Operation & Maintenance, Building Systems Monitoring; This university also looks to LEED-NC v. 2.2 standards and monitoring criteria. Specifically: 1. LEED-NC, v2.2 EA Credit 3: Enhanced Commissioning; 2. LEED-NC, v2.2 EA Credit 5: Measurement & Verification; and 3. LEED-NC, v2.2 EQ Credit 1: Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring. Action Plan: Within the context of the above LEED-EB v. 2.0 and LEED-NC v. 2.2 standards, Building Operations and Maintenance at this university will follow the following four basic strategies: 1. Commissioning, through design and 10 months into occupancy; 2. Maintenance & Operations Staff Continuing Education and Training; 3. Building Systems Maintenance; and 4. Building Systems Monitoring (M&V, Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring, Johnson Controls). In terms of the ID credit filing for this project, the project team describes how this university and this new dormitory and student support/activities spaces project meets and, in some cases, exceeds the credit criteria for the above three LEED-EB EA Credits 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3. Is this a viable ID credit for its LEED-NC v. 2.2 filing?

Ruling:

The project team has proposed an ID credit for meeting or exceeding the credit criteria for the three LEED-EB v2.0 EAc3 Building Operation & Maintenance credits: EAc3.1 Staff Education; EAc3.2 Building Systems Maintenance; and EAc3.3 Building Systems Monitoring. The project is purposing to integrate the design with the operations and maintenance of the building to continue good practice and promote energy efficiency during operations. The proposed credits from LEED-EB 2.0, have been modified for the current version. And the credits are now awarded for strategies that would receive credit under LEED-NC EAc5 Measurement and Verification. Therefore meeting the requirements of LEED-EB EAc3.1 & 3.2 is not sufficient for achievement of an ID credit. The proposed building staff education is a required component for LEED-NC EAc3 Enhanced Commissioning, and therefore also not sufficient for achievement of an ID credit. However, if the project wishes to implement other strategies from the current LEED-EB rating system for which credit is not already awarded under LEED-NC, the project is encouraged to do so. In addition, please note the LEED EB rating system has been upgraded as LEED EB: Operations and Maintenance. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/30/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This request seeks ID credit approval for an energy- and resource-saving, paperless, Web-based collaboration solution for architecture, engineering and construction project team members from multiple organizations (i.e. owner, construction management firm, general contractor, architecture firm, engineering firm, subcontractors, suppliers, etc.): our Virtual Project Office. We have used our experience with delivering consulting services and training on project management technologies to develop this customizable, easy-to-use Microsoft SharePoint-based tool; it is a private, secure, project-specific Web site. Our innovative solution helps project participants efficiently share and process vital documents like drawings, RFIs and contracts--all while slashing printing, shipping and travel energy- and resource-usage. Owners and contractors from multiple organizations can collaborate to make informed and timely decisions when they exchange and store data in a project\'s own secure, neutral, Web-based \'office,\' rather than using paper to print draft after draft of large files (i.e. drawings, specs, contracts, change notices, payment estimates, submittals, RFIs, correspondence, safety bulletins, contact directories, schedules, calendars, announcements, transmittals, progress photos, progress reports, meeting minutes, etc.) Any and every process our project requires can, and will, be incorporated into our Virtual Project Office. For example, when the project team is ready to request bids from contractors, we will use our paperless, Web-based Virtual Project Office to issue Requests for Proposals (RFPs), provide bidding instructions, and announce up-to-date questions and answers. We will be able to post downloadable construction documents such as drawings and project specs. Contractors will then upload their bids electronically, automatically notifying the bid manager--via e-mail--of their submission. Housing all bidding information in one secure, collaborative online workspace dramatically reduces the typical energy and resource consumption of the bidding process, supports confident contract-award decisions, and gets the project off to a successful start. We will use our collaboration solution to: Connect team members across organizational and geographic boundaries so they can collaborate regardless of their time and place of work--without spending energy, resources, money or time on paper, shipping or travel. Streamline review-and-approval processes (i.e. RFPs, RFIs, submittals, change notices, payment estimates, etc.) and make them electronic, eliminating the energy costs and delays of printing and shipping multiple copies of paper documents back and forth among project participants. Notify collaborators automatically via (paperless) e-mail when virtual documents are added and updated. Reduce energy- and resource-consuming litigation by mitigating all parties\' risk exposure with automatic auditing of revisions, ball-in-court requests, and responses. Protect private information using our secure, neutral collaboration platform, limiting each party\'s vulnerability to energy- and resource-consuming claims. Take advantage of seamless interoperability, configuration, training and support--eliminating potential energy and resource expenditures associated with printing and shipping training manuals and/or booking travel for consultants, instructors and attendees. Archive automatically--online--to incorporate Best Practices and Lessons Learned as standards, and build on the project team\'s successes.

Ruling:

The project team is proposing an Innovation in Design credit based on the merits of using a Web-based platform for document management, reducing the energy and resources consumed on administration and communication during the design and construction process. While it is agreed that this has the potential to reduce resource and energy use over the conventional project administrative process, it is not considered innovative as many project teams have adopted this technology. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
8/4/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ergonomics Strategy

Ruling:

Intent: To create and maintain a flexible ergonomic environment that properly accommodates building users and promotes healthy, comfortable and productive work.
Requirements: Develop and implement a comprehensive ergonomics strategy that will have a positive impact on human health and comfort when performing daily activity for at least 75% of Full Time Equivalent building users. This strategy must include the four components listed below.
1. Identify activities and building functions for which ergonomic enhancement (i.e., ergonomic strategies which exceed standard industry practice) is both possible and desirable through education and equipment. -. Building users should be consulted on their preferences wherever possible. NOTE: Project teams are encouraged to consult one or more of the existing ergonomics standards and guidelines when identifying ergonomic enhancement opportunities. For computer workstations, these include the BIFMA G1, the ANSI/HFES 100-2007, and CSA Z412-00. The US Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has developed ergonomic guidelines specifically for the following industries: Shipyards, Poultry, Retail Grocery Stores, Nursing Homes, and Meatpacking. OSHA also provides helpful information for many other industries in addition to those listed here (please see the Resources section below).
2. Define a set of performance goals and expectations for the ergonomics strategy that address productivity, comfort, and health. Develop a plan and design process to meet them. Provide procedures to track and report the results of the ergonomics strategy, ensure that the performance goals have been met, and identify areas of potential improvement. These should include the following actions: a) Make the performance goals and ergonomics plan available to building users b) Provide a feedback system to collect anonymous responses and respond to them. This should be informal and ongoing. c) Maintain ongoing building user access to appropriate ergonomics METWA's, furnishings, and accessories and education. d) Conduct a survey of user satisfaction. This should be more formal than the feedback system, and occur periodically. The survey must be collected from a representative sample of building occupants making up at least 30% of the total occupants.
3. Provide machine, equipment, tools, work-aids (METWA's), furnishings, and accessories that reduce the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and are acceptable to a wide range of building users. In a setting where building users that spend 50% or more of their time at computer workstations, the following four areas must be addressed: display, computer peripherals (keyboard/mouse), work surface, and chair. Computer workstations include areas in which workers interact with screens or monitors of any kind.
4. Provide ergonomics education to building users Provide at least two opportunities for building users to understand and take advantage of ergonomic features in their environment. At least one of these opportunities must be interactive, and at least one must include an explanation of the provided METWA's and furnishings, preferably by the manufacturer. Post-education evaluations must be conducted. Education opportunities may include, but are not limited to: a) Participatory classroom sessions conducted by an ergonomics professional b) Access to literature on products and basic ergonomic knowledge relevant to the building user's tasks c) Repetitive or regularly-scheduled workstation evaluations d) Interactive internet-based products such as assessment and training tools e) Hands-on experiences, such as access to the showroom of an ergonomic furnishing supplier
Submittals:
1. Provide a narrative that speaks to the requirements listed above. It should include: - descriptions of the steps the project team has taken to identify ergonomic enhancement opportunities. - a sentence or two verifying that it is possible to exceed standard industry practices to achieve an ergonomically superior workplace. - descriptions of the performance goals and expectations, and the steps the project team has taken to meet them - descriptions of the procedures put into place to track and report the results of the ergonomics strategy. Describe how each of the required actions, listed in #5 of the requirements section, will be take place. Describe the collaboration with the management team that will carry out these procedures. - description of how purchased METWA's and furnishings will benefit the building users as they conduct routine tasks and activities, the selection criteria used for choosing the products (i.e., how the safety and health of the building user was considered), and how the products will accommodate a wide range of size needs. Size needs can typically be met by buying products that come in 'families' (small, medium, large) or are highly adjustable. - descriptions of two ergonomics education opportunities made available to building users, including the objectives and content.
2. Provide a list of purchased METWA's and furnishings that minimize the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Include cut sheets and manufacturer information for each. For project certifying under LEED for Existing Buildings : Operations and Maintenance, at least one survey must be conducted during the performance period, and documented survey results and corrective actions to address issues identified through the surveys must also be provided.
Potential Technologies and Strategies: In general, consider METWA's and furnishings that will: - reduce awkward, non-neutral work postures (e.g. neck, shoulders, hands-wrist, low back, elbows, lower extremities) - reduce duration of sustained/static work postures (e.g. leaning forward, elevated arms, continuous grip) - reduce grip and pinch forces associated with required tasks (e.g. correct tools) - reduce the repetition and duration of tasks, especially those with non-neutral postures and/or higher forces - reduce contact stress - resting soft tissues of the body on hard or sharp surfaces. To address the four required areas for building users that spend 50% or more of their time at computer workstations, consider the following strategies: Display adjustability - The display centered directly in front of the body. - The top of the display screen placed no higher than the eyes. - The ability to place the display screen 18 to 36 inches from the eyes - Control over the tilt angle of the screen and its' position on the work surface - The capability to position the display low enough to accommodate individuals with bifocals or progressive addition lenses (PALs). This may be significantly lower than eye height reduced glare - The use of technologies such as flat-screen or anti-glare devices - The display positioned such that light sources will not create glare Peripherals - Paper documents placed on a document holder immediately to the left, right or below the display - The keyboard positioned so the home row (row with F and J keys) is no higher than the elbow - The ability to adjust the keyboard angle and set the slope of the keys flat, if so desired - Enough room for the mouse or pointing device to be used adjacent to the keyboard (left, right or in front). If a separate adjustable keyboard support is used it must have space specifically designed for using a mouse or pointing device; preferably the mouse pad should have the capability to be positioned flat if the keyboard is tilted - The arm used to control the pointing device supported, either on the work surface or armrest of the chair - Ergonomically correct keyboards, mouse, phones and other supporting peripherals purchased when possible Surface - Enough work surface to properly support the computer and peripherals. Provide a surface with minimum dimensions of 28 inches wide by 24 inches deep - Enough clear space under the surface to allow the legs and feet to be positioned in multiple postures - Furnishings in multi-occupant workstations that allow the user to control surface and support heights, with surface height initially at proper seated elbow height. If workstations are single-occupant it is acceptable for facilities management to adjust the heights of surfaces Chair - Range of chair types or chair features that optimize employee fit and task requirements. - Chairs with a wide range of adjustibility For building users that work in an industrial setting, consider: - Height adjustable work-surfaces (e.g. desks, work benches, fume hoods) - Pneumatic vs. electric vs. manual tools, material handling aids, such as lifts, height adjustable pallet jacks and hand trucks. - Range of hand and power tools sizes and weights that improve employee fit and function while reducing ergonomic risk factors, for example: grip diameter, multi-finger activation and vibration isolation For ergonomics education provided to building users, consider including information on: - The possible causes of musculoskeletal discomfort - Changing the workstation or work habits if discomfort is experienced during or after work - Benefits of taking work breaks either through altering tasks performed or leaving their workstation - Benefits of resting the eyes every 20 minutes - How to properly position and adjust display height and angle, keyboard height and angle, mouse location, use of task light and chair adjustments - Acceptable postures for the head, neck, shoulders, upper arms, wrists, back, legs and feet - Benefits of regularly changing posture either through adjusting the furnishings or altering the tasks performed - How to manage glare on the computer screen - A point of contact if discomfort becomes frequent (multiple times per week)
References: Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/ergonomics/index.html, Human Factors and Ergonomic Society http://www.hfes.org, Canadian Standards Association http://www.csa.ca, The Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturer's Association http://www.bifma.org/, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists http://www.acgih.org/, International Organization for Standardization www.iso.org please reference the ISO 9241 standard, The Hewlett Packard Safety and Comfort Guide http://www.hp.com/ergo/ HealthyComputing.com, http://www.healthycomputing.com/office/setup/, 'Effect of Office Ergonomics Intervention on Reducing Musculoskeletal Symptoms ' Amick B., Robertson, M., Derango, K., Bazzani, L., Moore, A., Rooney, T., Harrist, R., , Spine 2003, 23: 24, pp 2706-2711. This study demonstrates that an office ergonomics intervention can reduce a workers perceived level of pain and increase their productivity. 'A Prospective Study of Computer Users: II. Postural Risk Factors for Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Disorders' Marcus, M., Gerr, F., Monteilh, C., Ortiz, D., Gentry, E., Cohen, S., Edwards, A., Ensor, C., Kleinbaum, D., , American Journal of Industrial Medicine 2002, 41: pp 236-249 This landmark study reports on the body postures and work practices that increase or decrease the odds of computer users experiencing musculoskeletal discomfort and disorders.
Definitions: METWA : machine, equipment, tools, work-aids.
**Update October 1, 2013: There are only four required components, the text previously mentioned five. Applicable credits were also updated.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/3/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Innovation & Design Process: Exemplary Performance in Materials & Resources - Planning Chassis Intent Extend the life cycle of existing building materials, finishes, and furniture, conserve resources, reduce waste, and reduce environmental impacts of interior construction and renovation as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport. Requirements To receive an innovation point, the project team will demonstrate that a comprehensive planning chassis design is in place with clear performance goals, including: 1. A statement of purpose describing what the planning chassis design is trying to achieve from a health and environmental standpoint, focusing on reduced material consumption, waste, time, and cost related to "churn". 2. Retention of interior non-structural components, including furniture, through various phases of projected renovation, re-configuration, and churn. 3. A clear set of acceptable performance metrics by which to measure progress or achievement, including plans illustrating extreme variety in terms of configuration, density, function, and work style without the demolition of walls or significant modification of the architecture or finishes. 4. Documentation demonstrating that the planning chassis design results in improved environmental impact, and meets the criteria set forth in #2 above. Submittals 1. Current floor plan showing architectural and furniture elements (standard planning module) that will remain constant, even as the workplace evolves. 2. Projected variations on current floor plan, showing what impacts (demolition, construction, waste, inventory) would be required to achieve each variation. 3. Calculations (similar to MR 1.2 and 1.3) illustrating that each variation would result in compliance with guidelines. Design Approach Based on the program requirements of diverse lines of business within Bank of America, and the projected rate and nature of change within those lines of business, the design team proposed an interior infrastructure, or chassis, that will remain constant from floor to floor, among various lines of business, over time and with an inherent flexibility that allows each line of business to absorb the impact of change and to meet new demands through streamlined modifications. This infrastructure consists of a zoned space plan, modularity of all products, systems and materials, moveable walls, limited hard construction, and a systems and loose furniture "kit of parts". Much like an automobile chassis, the proposed planning concept meets diverse programmatic and work-style requirements, while allowing evolving future work environments to occur with speed and at a minimum cost over a long life cycle. The intent, in addition to meeting the above aesthetic and change management goals, is designed to meet environmental impact objectives, through reduced demolition and construction related to "churn". This strategy is comprehensive in that it will be implemented on all 23 associate floors being renovated in the Bank of America Corporate Center. We request a ruling on whether implementation of this design would achieve an Innovation & Design credit.

Ruling:

The applicant is proposing an innovation and design process credit for strategic architectural and furniture product choices and future scenarios planning which will maximize adaptability over time and minimize waste caused by heavy churn rates; an interior infrastructure that will remain constant over 23 floors, among various lines of business, and over time for the project. This infrastructure consists of a zoned space plan, modularity of all products, systems and materials, moveable walls, limited hard construction, and a systems and loose furniture "kit of parts". While this strategic space planning has clear advantages, it is simply good facilities management practice for a tenant such as this where "churn" is inevitable. The proposed strategy does not warrant the award of an innovation credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
8/13/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This project involves the construction of a land mark addition to one of the world\'s premier art museums. As such a world famous architect based out of Paris, France was contracted to design the 260,000 square foot addition. We would like to propose an innovation in design credit based on electronic transmission of submittal review packages with the assumption that we will be saving sending hardcopies back and forth to Europe. Would the following be considered for an innovation credit? Credit Intent: Reduce the project\'s carbon footprint Credit Requirements: 1. Document the total number of submittal packages reviewed by the architect. For the purposes of the calculations, we will assume a standard submittal package size of 10 pages of 11x17 paper, and five copies of each submittal 2. Based on the above assumption, calculate a total weight of submittal packages that would have been sent to Europe. 3. Provide evidence of the weight capacity and fuel use of a standard aircraft used to ship packages to Europe. 4. Indicate the total savings of harmful emissions from NOT shipping hard copies of the submittal packages. As a side note, the use of electronic transmission not only reduces the project\'s carbon footprint, but has the added benefit of faster review of the submittals, likely reducing the overall time of construction.

Ruling:

While the practice of electronic transmission of submittal review packages is laudable, it does not warrant an innovation credit. The electronic transmission of submittal review packages is not only becoming common practice, but it is a relatively small part of the larger impacts of an international team, e.g. travel, other shipping, etc. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent To utilize a comprehensive Sustainability Plan for a televised event that extends LEED guidelines from building to an annual event. Proposed Requirements Develop and implement a Sustainability Plan that reduces consumption, increases recycling and reuse, offsets fossil fuel energy use and implements Green Education. Provide resource use and disposal baseline quantities and track improvements. Submittal to demonstrate compliance a) Provide resource consumption baselines for a timeline that includes pre-event preparation and the event itself. b) Provide quantifiable improvements for the event using the same timeline as the baseline. Summary of project design approaches The Live Television Production is a temporary facility for an annual single evening event lasting 10 days. - SITES - Transportation: all participants (presenters and production staff) were provided with GM flex fuel and hybrid vehicles. - WATER Conservation: All urinals are waterless at the venue saving 7 million gallons per year. Lavatory sensors are provided for premium seating restrooms - ENERGY: 10% energy reduction with an incremental decrease of 1% per year for 10 year commitment: Production lighting is designed to reduce electrical usage. 2 million kilowatt-hours of Green Power was provided that met three times the electricity needs of the award broadcast 666,000 kwh were used for the broadcast. - MATERIAL: Reuse: 100 % of all building material on the production set is donated to non profit foundations and memorabilia. - MATERIAL: Recycled content - All paper products had recycled content - Invitations, Posters and Programs are printed on Endeavour Recycled Paper, which is 30% post consumer waste, 50% recycled and is Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. (1 LEED point for 50% FSC ) - Souvenir Telecast and awards celebration. Tickets are printed on stock that is 40% post-consumer waste and 60% recycled. - Tissue products 100% recyclable post-consumer napkins were used for five (5) full days of crew meals and craft services. vi) MATERIAL - Waste: 35% of waste is diverted from landfills by weight - Event generated 1,029 tons of trash, diverted 360 tons from landfill - Event is in compliance with assembly bill 2176 AB-2176. vii) IEQ -- Green Housekeeping: Venue uses two cleaning products that are green seal certified "Hillyard Chemicals. viii) Green Education - The promotion of all the "green" attributes of the event . Naras to confirm if the greening was indicated on any of the print material used for the event - Raise awareness of the availability and benefits of Green Power in Los Angeles and beyond. Green Volunteer Team responsible for placing recycling containers in key staff and public facing areas and educating people on what goes in the bins. In addition to managing the recycling stations, each volunteer had a document on hand to speak to the other aspects of the events that were green. ix) FOOD - Water sponsored by PRIMO, whose bottles are made from American grown corn oil, not petroleum - The 100% of food packaging is nature based and environmentally sustainable - 100% Sustainable Food for crew & parties - Regional, Organic, humane and environmentally-friendly food and food practices, including seafood, dairy, and produce - 100% Reusable service materials and accessories. Reusable service materials such as ceramic plates, glass tumblers and silverware included at crew meals and craft services. - Food Waste -- 100% food waste from the event was sorted, compacted and managed by New Market Waste Solutions for donation and composting. - Food Donation. Venue Concessionaire Partner donates edible left over food to the Angel Donation program at a local mission. Un-used food from the after-party (& crews) donated to local organization to feed the homeless in local shelters.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting confirmation on whether an innovation credit may be awarded based on sustainable practices relating to an annual event. Innovation credits are reserved for green building strategies that demonstrate innovative performance in green building that are not specifically addressed elsewhere in the rating system and/or demonstrate exceptional performance beyond existing credit requirements. While it is laudable that environmentally preferable practices be implemented for events, it does not appear that the proposed credit is related to green building practices and is therefore not eligible for an innovation credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/15/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are seeking an Innovation in Design credit for implementing a comprehensive water filtration system that will reduce occupants\' exposure to contaminants generally present in tap water. In the same way that Indoor Environmental Quality credits address the reduction of airborne contaminants found in building interiors, this system addresses waterborne contaminants that are commonly found in local water supplies. This system also obviates the need for occupants to purchase bottled water products, which can help reduce the over 60 million plastic bottles that are discarded everyday in the United States. The system we are considering combines an extremely water-efficient building-wide first stage water filter that removes 100% of particulates 10 microns or larger and approximately 50% of particulates smaller than 10 microns, with a secondary stage consisting of individual "point-of-use" filters in the apartment kitchens. The point-of-use filters use a multi-stage filtration system that includes pulverized activated carbon which significantly reduces organic chemicals and a membrane that removes particulates 0.5 micron and larger. By preventing particles larger than 10 microns from ever reaching the .5 micron kitchen filters, the primary filtration system significantly extends the effective life of the secondary filters (approximately a 300% increase in filtration cartridge longevity), thus reducing maintenance and ensuring a higher flow rate and quality of water. The secondary system has been tested and certified by NSF/ANSI to reduce VOCs and trihalomethanes (THMs) which the EPA classifies as a "probable human carcinogen," by 99.86 percent. Trihalomethanes are the byproduct of municipality-introduced chlorine interacting with organic material in the source water. It also has been shown to reduce cysts, such as Cryptosporidium, by 99.99 percent. A 1993 Milwaukee outbreak of Cryptosporidium left 400,000 ill and 70 dead. This is likely to become more important since water borne disease is seen as a probable consequence of the increasing hydrologic events and flooding caused by climate change. The following list of contaminant reductions has been certified by NSF/ANSI (42 & 53): - Chlorine: Avg. Reduction-96.8% - Volatile Organic Chemicals, including Trihalomethanes (THMs): Avg. Reduction-99.86% -Asbestos fibers >10 micrometers in length: Avg. Reduction-99.86% -Cysts: Avg. Reduction-99.99% -Chloroform (VOC surrogate chemical): 98.6% This combined filtration system improves occupant health and reduces the amount of resources typically required to achieve this level of water purity. Therefore, it should be eligible for an innovation point. Suggested Credit Title: Comprehensive Drinking Water Filtration Intent: Reduce the exposure to potentially harmful waterborne contaminants. Requirements: Provide building-wide water filtration that removes particulate contamination equal to or smaller than 10 microns AND Provide point-of-use water filtration that is NSF/ANSI tested to reduce Chlorine, VOCs, Asbestos fibers, Cysts and Chloroform by at least 95%.

Ruling:

While the potential health benefits of a water filtration system are laudable, water filtration systems are relatively common, and there is no precedent for rewarding ID for such a measure. It is possible that an ID credit could be earned for the reduction of waste/transportation impact/etc. due to the use of filtered water rather than individually purchased water or company purchased water cooler service. The applicant would have to submit defensible calculations demonstrating the quantities of waste and/or pollution averted through point-of-use water filtering, and provide a description of programs or policies that encourage facility users to take advantage of the filtered water rather than purchasing bottled water. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/23/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Low-Cost HVAC For Green Buildings According to the R.S. Means Square Foot Costs, 25th Edition, the HVAC cost for a single-story office building 7,000 to 20,000 square feet in size will be $13 to $17 per square foot. This cost range is for a typical HVAC system that meets minimum building code requirements, but can not meet ASHRAE Standards 62 or 55. Our intent was to provide an HVAC system that met ASHRAE Standards 62 and 55 and used less energy while costing at least 20% less than a standard system. Our design approach combined air-to-air energy recovery with furnace/air conditioning units. The air-to-air energy recovery units deliver 1,648 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of outdoor air at constant volume or 38 cfm for each building occupant. This ventilation rate is almost twice the rate required by ASHRAE Standard 62. In addition, the air-to-air energy recovery units allow moisture transfer between the exhaust and outdoor air streams, helping to meet ASHRAE Standard 55 for comfort all year long. The total cost of the HVAC system is just $99,120 or $8.30 per square foot which includes all overhead and profit. This cost is 35% less than the lowest figure published by R.S. Means. Furthermore, the system uses 30% less cooling energy and 10% less heating energy than a system that just complies with ASHRAE Standard 90, and the system uses non-chlorinated refrigerant. This system is green and very cost effective.

Ruling:

Your proposal is not sufficient for an innovation credit. However, the system contributes towards the achievement of various other LEED prerequisites and credits. The ventilation rates and thermal comfort criteria relates to EQp1 Minimum IAQ Performance, EQc1 Carbon Dioxide Monitoring, EQc2 Ventilation Effectiveness, and EQc7 Thermal Comfort. The efficiency of the air-to-air heat exchanger can be accounted for under EAc1 Optimized Energy Performance. With all verifiable environmental benefits of the proposed system accounted for in the existing credits of the Rating System, the cost savings of the system itself does not demonstrate additional environmental benefit, and would therefore not qualify for an innovation credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/5/2004
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Clerestory to bring natural light into subterranean space: exceptional IEQ Our project is a 250,000SF subterranean sports facility. Due to the site and security constraints, we are unable to incorporate windows in the space. However, the design team feels strongly about the importance of natural light, especially in a sports facility, where users are exercising and relaxing. Therefore, in the design, we introduce 4 clerestories, designed with internal reflectors, along the sports facility to bring in natural light. As a result, the daylight factors of the major interior spaces are as follows: Natatorium: 7% Indoor track: 29% Indoor basketball court: 14% This is remarkable results for an underground facility. the clerestories also serves as fresh air intakes for the mechanical systems, therefore reducing the need of constructing a separate aerial way. We strongly believe that this will be qualified for an Innovation and Design Credit.

Ruling:

The incorporation of daylight is a strategy which is addressed in EQc8 and is a design option in most building types, including underground facilities. It appears that the design strategy outlined will meet the criteria for EQc8.1 for natural light in 75% of regularly occupied spaces and does not warrant a separate credit for innovation. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/30/2001
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Innovation Question, Breaking Down Barriers to Mass Transit:The Block 225 project is part of a 5 building campus for the State of California. A portion of the response to the neighborhood in the EIR was that the State would contribute funds to the improvement of the local park, Fremont Park, for renovation and restoration. The funds are to be used for a specific function, that of restoring historic diagonal pedestrian links across the park. The benefit to the entire project, including Block 225, is that the contribution will be used to restore a connection from the project to the light rail system, thereby encouraging the use of mass transit. Without these links, a barrier to mass transit would exist.Question: Could this response to neighborhood concerns regarding open space and mass transit be considered an innovation credit?

Ruling:

It is possible to allocate portions of a campus project to its subservient buildings on a square foot basis. The two performance measures mentioned however are already part of the LEED Rating System, and would not constitute innovation, which can generally be taken to mean new and previously unthought of ideas. Use the open space features allocated on a square foot basis towards Credit SSc5.2 Site Preservation, Maximize Open Space, and apply for the Alternative Transportation Credit, Public Transportation Access.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/24/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We propose that a LEED Innovation & Design Process (IDP) point be awarded to any project that combines the two transportation strategies of public transportation and third party car sharing from a company like WeCar by Enterprise (http://www.wecar.com/) or an equivalent program. By providing the car sharing program MORE employees can utilize public transportation because employees will be less tempted to drive their own cars to work for out of office meetings/business that may not be accessible by public transportation and will also reduce parking demand in the vicinity of the tenant space. The tenant owner would pay for a monthly public transportation pass (or equivalent) to employees and also offer a third party car sharing program in which cars are strategically placed around the city; accessed electronically by participants; booked online; available 24 hours a day seven days a week and utilize hybrid cars. Below is an outline of the potential Innovation Credit. Intent: Reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use. Promote use of public transportation and car sharing. Proposed requirements for compliance: Tenant to promote use of public transportation by offering to employees a stipend to cover the cost of a monthly public transportation pass cost or equivalent. AND Offer a third party car sharing program to employees for business related travel. The car sharing program will utilize fuel efficient hybrid automobiles and demonstrate that there will be enough cars available in the area to supplement the need from the tenant space. Proposed submittals to demonstrate compliance: Car sharing lease agreement, area plan showing location of cars realtive to tenant space, and signed letter from owner stating that they will provide a stipend for employees to purchase a monthly public transportation pass or equivalent. Technologies and Strategies: Perform a transportation survey of potential tenant occupants to identify transportation needs. Choose a building near mass transit and located near a car sharing program. Considerations: Offering to pay for staff members public transportation cost will help promote use of public transportation and reduce carbon emissions. Car sharing is becoming a popular way to pool transportation resources and have access to an automobile without owning one.

Ruling:

The project team is inquiring as to whether providing transit passes and access to a car sharing service warrant an ID credit. If these actions are part of a Comprehensive Transportation Management Plan, similar to that outlined in LEED-NC v2.1, IDc1.1 CIR Ruling dated 5/9/2003, then credit achievement would be anticipated. In addition to meeting the requirements of the referenced CIR, two of the three SSc3 Credits must be awarded for CI projects. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
12/19/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We recognize that ID credits cannot be granted achievement via the CIR process, but request the review of this proposed approach for viability to support a project earning an ID credit by meeting these requirements. Please provide insight as to the type & level of documentation required to pursue such an ID credit. Title Use of new facility to promote enhanced waste recycling programs significantly beyond the LEED criteria Credit Intent The promotion of waste recycling programs beyond the requirements required by LEED. The new facility will allow expanded programs of recycling to be practiced at the facility. The company has implemented innovative donation and recycling programs to address the recycling of wastes generated by it\'s manufacturing operations. The new facility will provide the waste storage and processing capability to extend and improve these programs. Credit Requirements To extend the size of the facility to incorporate improved waste management facilities and provide expansion space for new recycling projects. Project Approach The operation of the current waste recycling programs is limited by the storage and processing facilities of the existing facility. Construction of the new facility will be used to enhance the existing programs and provide factory space to investigate new programs Programs Waste to Energy Project - conversion of previously land-filled carpet scrap into energy to fire Cement kilns Waste Yarn Donation Program - Donation of waste yarn to charitable organizations in North East Thailand to convert into Hammocks. Example: The yarn donation program has helped to develop economical income for those who previously were limited. On average the production of 2 hammocks per day earns approximately 200$ or 4,000 - 5,000 Baht per month per family. There are approximately 500 people involved in this program now. Waste Tile Donation - Slight seconds donations to charitable organizations; Temples, Schools etc. Cardboard Cone recycling - Reclaim and sale to supplier. Comprehensive documentation / metric results are available for all of these programs.

Ruling:

Adding square footage in the building is not enough by itself to warrant an innovation credit, and the proposed credit requirement language is unacceptably vague. However, the proposed activities may be still be eligible. To achieve an innovation credit, the LEED submittal must clearly demonstrate quantifiable exemplary performance. The NCv2.1 IDc1.1 ruling dated 9/6/05 provides a compliance path for you. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes

LEEDuser expert

Tristan Roberts

LEED AP BD+C, LFA

Quill Nook Farm
HPDC Technical Director

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