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Green Globes CIEB Technical Reference Manual?

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Green Globes CIEB Technical Reference Manual?

February 4, 2016

I found the technical reference manual for Green Globes NC, but was wondering if someone could help me find one for Green Globes CIEB?

Thanks

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LEED Fellow Yudelson to Lead Rival Green Globes

A new force will be making Green Globes go ’round.

Jerry Yudelson, P.E., a LEED Fellow and a prominent green building advocate, has joined the Green Building Initiative (GBI) as president. “It’s a new beginning,” Yudelson told LEEDuser. “We pushed the reset button.”

GBI’s relationship with its former—and controversial—president, timber lobbyist Ward Hubbell, along with lobbying and public relations firm Hubbell Communications, “has been severed,” Yudelson confirmed, and the group has moved from the Hubbell building to a new location in southwest Portland, Oregon.

Yudelson said he will be a much-needed “public face” for the organization, “kind of in the same way Rick Fedrizzi does for USGBC” (the U.S. Green Building Council, where Fedrizzi is president, CEO, and founding chairman). “I’ll also set up a strategic planning process and take them to the next level of development,” Yudelson added.

‘Not anti-LEED’

Despite GBI’s history of an adversarial relationship with LEED and USGBC, Yudelson asserts he’s “not saying anything negative about LEED.” Instead, he points out that “LEED does not meet everyone’s needs” and says there’s demand in the marketplace for a low-cost, user-friendly system that can make buildings greener than they would be without any certification at all.

“My goal is to be in the marketplace with a good product, a good approach, and to get more people to do green building,” he explained. “I don’t really see us getting engaged in anti-LEED activity as an organization.”

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Yudelson does fault LEED’s bureaucracy for increasing the cost and slowing the uptake of green building, comparing credit interpretations to “religious fatwas” and arguing that LEED’s complexity creates “the need for highly specialized consultants” who understand “the latest rulings from the ‘mullahs.’” But he views GBI’s role as that of “a friendly competitor” rather than a nemesis.

Competition, he argues, “forces you to continue to respond to the marketplace,” and he points to the Living Building Challenge (LBC) as a model of friendly competition. “There’s always an engine on the train and a caboose and a bunch of cars in the middle,” he said (apparently hinting that LBC is the engine, LEED the cars, and Green Globes the caboose). “But everyone wants to go in the right direction.”

Better, faster, or cheaper: Pick two

In an SSp1, MRp1, and EAp3—that are generally considered easy to document on U.S. projects, where they are standard measures, but more of a push on non-U.S. projects.)

Maybe just faster?

Robert Phinney, AIA, director of sustainable design and energy services at HDR Architecture, challenged the idea that Green Globes is less expensive.

“I am constantly hearing that one of the major benefits of Green Globes over LEED is the perception of lower costs. I find this to be misleading, and in many cases, simply incorrect,” he told LEEDuser. “On one recent project, we were asked to look at the cost of pursuing minimum LEED certification and minimum Green Globes certification,” and the results surprised him.

Phinney found that registration costs would be more than twice as much for Green Globes as for LEED ($17,000 vs. $8,150). This meant that although “the LEED process required more effort on the consulting side,” that cost premium “about equalled the difference in admin costs, while the level of effort for the design disciplines throughout each process remained consistent.”

That said, continued Phinney, “From a technical standpoint, both LEED and Green Globes have their pros and cons, and this cost assessment does not reflect a judgment on the choice of one system or another. Each has their place in the industry.”

“About time” or a betrayal?

On social media and in private exchanges, green building professionals expressed a variety of reactions to Yudelson’s move, ranging from “It’s about time LEED had some real competition” to surprise that a long-time LEED advocate would join an organization that has sought to undermine LEED.

Green pundit Eric Corey Freed stated simply, “This should be great for Green Globes,” while LEED consultant and faculty member Rob Hink tweeted, “Why does Benedict Arnold come to mind?”

“Just picked myself up off the carpet after learning that Jerry Yudelson has become head of GBI/Green Globes,” added Treehugger managing editor Lloyd Alter, who’s been a scathing critic of Green Globes and Hubbell Communications continually since the group’s inception.

Beyond the wood wars

Asked whether GBI’s close ties with the timber and chemical industries gave him pause, Yudelson said he planned to expand the reach of Green Globes to a much broader group of stakeholders.

“Clearly there was a history of wanting another form of wood certification,” Yudelson concedes (see our investigative blog series on the “wood wars”). “I’m not going to look at the history and say it wasn’t what it was.”

But the membership base and board of directors—which currently have outsized representation from mainstream timber and plastics groups—are already diversifying, he claims, and he intends to build on that by doubling the number of members and “build[ing] a membership much more strongly in the area of users and the area of professional services. If you look at the board twelve months from now,” he hopes, “you would say, ‘Gee that looks a lot like USGBC.’” Another goal for the coming year, he told LEEDuser, is to increase Green Globes’ market share in the green building certification world to 10% (from an estimated 2%–4% currently).

And ANSI?

Yudelson was not prepared to address directly the recent controversy over discrepancies between the Green Globes tool and GBI’s ANSI standard—a controversy that led to the resignation of longtime GBI board member Harvey Bryan, Ph.D., FAIA (see “Green Globes Board Member Quits Over ANSI Claims“)—but he told LEEDuser he planned to “find out what [Bryan’s] critique is in some detail” and to address that critique, adding that “we’re committed to being an ANSI standards organization, whatever that ends up meaning in practice.”

Although claiming to build bridges, Yudelson took a dig at USGBC for not achieving unanimous support for LEED version 4 (LEED v4). “One in seven people voted against it,” he pointed out. “Some people had genuine concerns about workability and so forth. That’s a fact.” In apparent contrast, GBI will “continue to go down the path” of a “consensus standards approach,” he added.

Although GBI has often attempted to paint LEED as lacking full support and industry representation, consensus standards almost never require a unanimous vote. Like many consensus-based systems, USGBC’s own rules require a two-thirds majority for approval of the standard, and the LEED v4 vote was a historic landslide, with 86% approval. (Contrary to Yudelson’s statistics, only 1 in 10 voters voted against, with 4% abstaining. See “LEED v4 Overwhelmingly Approved by USGBC Members.”)

More tools

Yudelson insists he’s trying to fortify sustainability, however, rather than tear down LEED.

“Ultimately, most buildings are built without attention to any standards other than the building code,” Yudelson told LEEDuser. “Our goal has been to get every building to up its game in terms of environmental performance. We need more—rather than fewer—tools to do that. If this thing can work, it’s going to help everybody.”

[Disclaimer: BuildingGreen, Inc. owns LEEDuser, a virtual LEED help desk, and some BuildingGreen staff members have worked with USGBC as volunteers and contractors.]

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ID Credit for Dual Certification

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Green Globes Discussion Forum

ID Credit for Dual Certification

July 19, 2012

Hi I have a project that is going for dual certification. It has just been awarded a 3 Globe rating for Green Globes and looks to land strongly in the middle of LEED Silver. Do you think an innovation in design credit can be applied for for achieving an additional sustainable building certification on the building, or is it too much of a conflict of interest to fly?

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LEED vs. Green Globes

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Green Globes Discussion Forum

LEED vs. Green Globes

July 14, 2011

We're always looking for things that compare LEED to Green Globes so that we can address these issues with our clients. Here is a short internal summary we put together with resources from leeduser. Comments?

LEED versus Green Globes (http://www.leeduser.com/topic/getting-know-green-globes)
• As a tool, Green Globes is fine. As a rating system it doesn’t have enough transparency, standardization, or minimum standards. It does highlight LEED’s shortcomings. I'd rather have LEED that is intended to create and maintain a standard of quality that responds to these needs rather than a Green Globes whose intention is to provide an easier way to certification without upholding the substance.
Problems with LEED:
• Needs to be more responsive to project specifics.
• Needs more flexibility.
• Needs a better online system.
• Needs better response time and consistency among reviewers.

Problems with Green Globes:
• The main issue, to me, is the scoring of those subjective issues like space use optimization (and many many more) where a team can say, "yeah, we're doing that" and the reviewer can say "well, ok," without any of the transparency as to what thresholds have been met.
• No prerequisites in Green Globes
o Does not require minimum performance.
o There are no prerequisites, so a building could provide no outdoor air, for example, make all the occupants sick and die, and still be certified.
• Little transparency in Green Globes
o When I hold up a LEED scorecard, I'm like a doctor reading a patient's chart. I know what's going on in the building, what they achieved, what they didn't, and I can usually find the associated strategies by looking around said patient-building. But with Green Globes, there is no "checklist" to see. Or rather, it's damn hard to get a hold of one unless you have a project in the works. It is therefore really hard to know what's weighted highly, what specific measures they are looking for, etc. This again falls into the lack of transparency trap, which for me is one of the program’s biggest failings to date.
• Green Globes uses Target Finder instead of Energy Model
o Also, I'm not sure I think that using Target Finder for to score a project’s energy performance is a good idea. I could be sold on this point, but I'm on the fence. Our use of Target Finder on New Construction projects has provided a rough sense of where a project should end up, but it seems a bit arbitrary. Plus, you miss out on the use of energy modeling as a way to explore options and encourage learning of the relative value of one energy-saving measure versus another (note: in talking to Green Globes representatives, I got the impression that one could use energy modeling as an alternative compliance path, and that almost any energy model would do (yikes!), but again, there is so little transparency that one has to really hustle to try to get any info.

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Green Globes

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Green Globes

July 13, 2011

Considering that in 2008 Jones Lang LaSalle acquired ECD ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT CANADA LTD, who developed Green Globes. ... I think there are inherent conflicts of using a rating system owned by a private management company; especially if you client is not JLL. Just though I would put this out there for all to be aware of before considering using Green Globes.

References:

http://www.greenbiz.com/news/2008/07/10/jones-lang-lasalle-acquires-toro...

http://www.ic.gc.ca/app/ccc/srch/nvgt.do?sbPrtl=&prtl=1&estblmntNo=12345...

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A troubled history

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Green Globes Discussion Forum

A troubled history

July 13, 2011

In terms of negatives users should be aware of, I find the origins of Green globes quite troubling. The original system was launched as a competitor to LEED, although it was actually was very similar to LEED, with over 80% of the credits (by my count) being copied from LEED. One of the most notable differences was that the credits for certified wood put SFI and other industry-sponsored forest certification schemes on an equal footing with FSC, which was developed in partnership with the environmental community. (LEED has only accepted FSC, which is the higher environmental standard.) In fact, Green Globes was originally supported by only two major players: American Forest & Plywood Association (who also wrote the SFI forestry standard), and National Association of Homebuilders (representing AFPA's biggest customers). Neither organization has environmental credibility. As I see it, after AFPA launched SFI to compete with FSC, it launched Green Globes to compete with LEED. This is a classic "greenwashing" tactic -- to confuse the marketplace by introducing bogus competing certifications.

The authors defend this practice by claiming that the green building sector benefits from more choice among certification standards. I think that's a poor argument. We don't need competing standards to the national Organic standard for food -- but what we get from industry are attempts to pressure the National Organic Standards Board to lower their standards and misleading claims of "natural" foods (which is an unregulated term) to confuse the marketplace. In the building arena, we don't need competing building codes; we need a clear standard for the protection of life safety. Nor will competing standards for green help the building industry to educate our clients and partners who have less time to learn about the environmental impacts of our industry than we do. When planning for long-term sustainability and environmental protection, we need clear standards with a high bar, not a dubious competition. The forest industry couldn't get SFI accepted by LEED (although they are still trying), so they set up this dubious competitor.

In a recent LEED EBO&M project I undertook for a large commercial office tower one of the tenants was a forestry company that objected to the property management using LEED as their standard as they would have preferred Green Globes. Their objection was based purely on the forest standards used by the two rating systems, which account for 1-2% of the total content. To me that indicated that Green Globes is still very much a creature of the forestry industry. I think that potential Green Globes users should be aware of the lack of credibility that the rating system has within the environmental community.

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Green Globes Questions

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Green Globes Discussion Forum

Green Globes Questions

June 2, 2011

Hi everyone-

I'd love to learn more about Green Globes! Has anyone worked with the program before?

Was it as user friendly as they say?
What was the cost and timeline like?
Is it comparable to LEED?
How stringent is it?
Are there any negatives I should know about?

Thanks!!!!

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Getting to Know Green Globes

Attending my first presentation on Green Globes, I was suspicious, but interested to get the low-down on how it works.

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