Log in
LEED Pilot Credits
LEED Pilot Credit Library
Process-Related Pilot Credits
Assessment and Planning for Resilience

LEED CREDIT

Pilot-Credits IPpc98: Assessment and planning for resilience 1 point

LEEDuser’s viewpoint

Explore this LEED credit

Post your questions on this credit in the forum, and click on the credit language tab to review to the LEED requirements.

Credit language

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To encourage designers, planners and building owners/operators to proactively plan before design commences for the potential impacts of natural disasters or disturbances as well as address issues that impact long-term building performance such as changing climate conditions.

Requirements

Complete a Hazard Assessment prerequisite plus at least one of two options: 1) Climate Related Risk Management Planning or 2) Emergency Preparedness Planning. The Hazard Assessment prerequisite and either Planning option shall be initiated and substantially completed in pre-design. Note as climate science understanding has grown, scientists recommend that looking at historical climate records alone especially for precipitation, storms, and temperature should not be used to address future conditions. We recommend taking into account future climate projections as described in Option 1: Climate-Related Risk Management Planning wherever possible based on client and project requirements.

The Hazard Assessment may be used for multiple projects within the same location or campus, but must be less than 6 years old at the time of submittal.

Outside the United States, project teams may use the U.S. standards if applicable or local equivalent standards, whichever are more stringent, and document their equivalence.

PREREQUISITE: Conduct Hazard Assessment for the Project Site

Step One: Identify the potential high risks associated with natural hazards affecting the project site(s) and building function. In some cases these risks may include man-made events, such as power management accidents and direct human action; these are important variables that could be considered in planning.
For jurisdictions with hazard mitigation plans:

Refer to local, county, state and national hazard mitigation plans to identify hazard risks directly or indirectly impacting the project site. For an example of a local hazard mitigation plan see City of Los Angeles 2018 Local Hazard Mitigation Plan

In addition, review site-specific references where available to identify hazard risk modifiers of a particular location (e.g. Flooding, Hurricane, High Winds, Tornado, Earthquake, Tsunami, Wildfire, Drought, Landslides).

  • For general reference, use the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety Home Page (IBHS) Zip Code tool located on their webpage.

For jurisdictions where hazard mitigation plans are not available or for site-specific hazard identification:

Recommend the project team consult with an environmental scientist or qualified risk/compliance officer to address all relevant conditions for the project site where possible. Use the following resources to identify high hazard conditions.

For projects outside the United States:

International projects may use the U.S. standard if applicable or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.

Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge

Identify impacts associated with sea level rise. Consider additional storm surge impacts in connection with hurricanes and tropical storms. Use NOAA SLOSH Model data to interpolate storm surge. In the absence of SLOSH Model data use the Surging Seas Threat Map and Forecasting Tools to establish storm surge scenarios that take into account sea level rise. Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge for 2022 and beyond should use the NOAA 2012 Sea Level Rise year 2080 High Scenario combined with a 1 in 100-year floodplain (Extreme Flood) to determine water levels for planning purposes.

Flooding

Identify flood risk; determine whether project is located within the 500-year floodplain. If that information is not available, use the 100-year floodplain and add three feet (1 meter) to that measurement.

AND

Identify if the project includes a risk to any activity or element for which even a slight chance of flooding would be too great.

Reference:

Hurricane and High-Wind Areas

Identify hurricane and high-wind risk; determine whether project site is located within a hurricane or high-wind susceptible region. In determining the type of risk, distinguish whether the project site has hurricane risk combined with high-wind risk, wind-borne debris, and storm surge, or if is a project site with high-wind (non-hurricane) risk alone.

Hurricane-Prone Regions: Areas vulnerable to hurricanes as defined in ASCE 7 are considered hurricane-prone regions. For ASCE 7-10 and ASCE 7-16, hurricane-prone regions are locations along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coasts where the wind speed for Risk Category II buildings is greater than 115 mph (185 kmh) plus Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and American Samoa. For Risk Categories III and IV, see ASCE 7-10 or 7-16, Chapter 26.

Reference:

Additional Resources:

Tornado

Identify tornado risk; identify whether project site is located above EF3 (136 mph/219 kmh– 156 mph /251 kmh) tornado activity area

References:

Earthquake

Identify seismic risk; determine whether project is within FEMA Earthquake zones SDC C (yellow), D - (orange), or E (red).

References:

If seismic risk is identified in the referenced FEMA zones listed in this pilot credit, where possible, pursue further specific analysis of site and surrounding conditions that will influence seismic hazards, such as soil conditions, adjacent structures, and service to the site.

Consider the secondary hazard of fire-following-earthquake where earthquakes are a high hazard.

Tsunami

Identify tsunami risk; determine whether project is within a tsunami inundation zone1.

Reference:

Wildfire

Identify wildfire risk; determine whether project is located in an area that is designated high or very high wildfire hazard potential. Also consider urban fires in densely populated urban residential areas with older construction without interior sprinklers.

References:

Drought

Identify drought risk; determine whether the project is in U.S. locations that have experienced Moderate, Severe, or Extreme drought conditions for more than 25% of the time in the past 30 years.

Reference:

Landslides and unstable soil

Identify relative landslide, subsidence and liquefaction risk, and critical slopes risk that may indicate unstable soil. Refer to state and local data2 to determine whether the project is located in a high risk landslide area and whether there is land on or uphill of the building site with a slope exceeding 15% (6.75°).

Reference:

Extreme Heat

Identify if project is located in an area subject to extreme heat events.

References:

Winter Storms

Identify if project is located in an area subject to frequent winter storms. Assess whether winter storms could impact essential operations or access to the site.

Reference:

Step Two:

Solicit input from the client on site-specific vulnerabilities to incorporate into the preliminary analysis. Document hazard findings and assess potential exposure, sensitivity and vulnerability to each hazard based on the project goals, program and intended service for the life of the building. Review preliminary findings with the client and project team to determine the top three hazard-related risks for further project planning, or less If fewer than three hazards are identified. If more than three hazard-related risks are identified, project teams may at their option choose to include more than the top three.

Additional General Issues to Consider
Direct Human Actions
Human-induced hazards are events caused by—often intentional—human actions. The impact of these events ranges from disruption of municipal area operations (such as during a strike), to undue use of force by authorities (such in response to peaceful protests), to serious harm at a limited scale (such as during a shooting), to widespread death and destruction at a neighborhood scale (such as during detonation of an improvised explosive device). Civil unrest, government intrusion, strikes, active shootings, and improvised explosive devices are some of the human-induced hazards that a facility may face. Additionally as our energy infrastructure becomes more complex and increasingly controlled by Internet-based, "smart" technology, there are more points of accidental failure and also risk of hacking into controls.

While specific requirements for resilience measures related to direct human actions and equipment malfunctions for other reasons are not included in this credit, design teams are encouraged to address passive survivability measures covered in LEED Resilience Pilot Credit IPpc100.

Consider conducting a Comprehensive Safety Report which outlines risks associated with some of the most disruptive Human Induced Hazards.

ACHIEVE ONE OF THE TWO FOLLOWING OPTIONS, IN ADDITION TO THE PREREQUISITE
OPTION 1: Climate Related Risk Management Planning

Step One:

Complete a vulnerability assessment of impacts associated with climate change over the long-term service life of the project in order to ensure reliable performance of the project’s mission and operations in changing conditions.

Use the following resources to help determine future climate impacts:

For regions where local climate change studies are available:

Refer to regional, state, provincial and local governments’ climate change studies that identify local vulnerabilities. In all cases where equivalent standards are used, identify them in the documentation.

For projects outside the United States where local climate change studies are not available:

Consult with a climate scientist, or qualified risk/compliance officer to address all relevant conditions for the project site where possible; International projects may use the U.S. standard or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.

For United States regions where local climate change studies are not available or for additional information:

Consider the following resources to identify vulnerability conditions. Consult with a climate scientist or qualified risk/compliance officer to address all relevant conditions for the project site where possible.

General Climate Change U.S. Regional Predictions3

General References:

Riverine Flood Projections

Identify if project is located in an area identified as a long-term (10 - 50 years or longer) flood risk.
Identify if there is a greater than 50% long-term flood risk per the following.

Resources:

Temperature, Precipitation and Degree Day Projections

Identify the range of project temperature, precipitation and degree day changes based on project service life.

Resources:

  • Climate Explorer: provides temperature, precipitation and degree days climate projections by zip code for each county in the U.S.:
  • 2017 Climate Science Special Report, Fourth National Climate Assessment Chapters 6 and 7
  • For Alaska and parts of Canada: SNAP

For projects outside the U.S.:

Extreme Weather Events

With temperature and precipitation reaching new extremes, winter storms and extreme weather events are becoming more frequent and intense. Consider the potential impacts.

Resources:

Step Two:

Undertake a climate risk management analysis to identify any climate risk factors that the project should take into account in the project planning and design. Look at the project location, goals, and program along with degree of exposure and sensitivity to identify which climate change vulnerabilities are of highest priority. Use the Climate Related Risk Management Planning Template to guide your discussion

  • Take into account the expected service life of the project and identify vulnerabilities based on changes predicted to take place during that time period.
  • Work with the client to establish the risk tolerance for climate projections. For example, if the facility is one with a long-term service life and high priority functions, it may warrant a higher climate projection scenario.
  • Consider using the IBC Risk Category Designations to help determine risk tolerance.
  • Consider the adaptive capacity to address the potential vulnerabilities. Robust infrastructure and strong social networks are two factors that can reduce vulnerability.
  • Since the outcomes from high wind events, winter storms or extreme heat events often result in temporary loss of power, design teams are strongly encouraged to address passive survivability measures covered in Resilience Pilot Credit IPpc100.
Step Three:

Based on the climate risk factors identified, develop preliminary project site selection (if possible), programming, planning and design parameters to reduce vulnerability or increase resilience to climate and natural resource conditions for the project. Address the following topics as applicable:

  • Project location and elevation
  • Adjacent site features and development
  • Availability of and access to services and infrastructure
  • Building envelope performance requirements
  • Building materials
  • Passive systems
  • Site design
  • Passive survivability (see Resilience pilot credit IPpc100)
  • Other systems

For future Best Practices, but not required in this credit, consider:

  • Include thresholds in planning to monitor the project as climate conditions change.
  • Development of a phased adaptation plan that proposes decadal timing to adapt the enclosure to reduce heating and cooling loads over time based on projected changes of extreme temperatures

General Reference:

See the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit for process recommendations, many valuable tools and resources and best practice case studies.

OPTION 2: Emergency Preparedness Planning

Ensure that project owner or facility management staff have evaluated their emergency preparedness and that a measurable assessment program is in place for continuous improvement. This evaluation and assessment program shall be initiated and substantially completed in pre-design.

Prepare the Red Cross 123 Assessment and Facility Description Forms™ to identify the specific emergency preparedness features of the building and planning process.

Documentation

General

Register for the pilot credit

Participate in the LEEDuser pilot credit forum

Complete the feedback survey:
Pilot Credit Survey

Credit Specific
Prerequisite: Conduct Hazard Assessment for the Project Site

Submit the completed Assessment and Planning for Resilience Workbook that summarizes the hazard identification, reference documents, and determination of priorities. Attach any site-specific custom analyses developed. Demonstrate that analysis was initiated and substantially completed in pre-design.

Where an alternative international standard has been used, document its equivalence with the applicable US-based standard.

AND

Option 1: Climate Related Risk Management Planning

Submit the completed Climate Related Risk Management Planning template, found in the Assessment and Planning for Resilience Workbook, that summarizes the vulnerability identification and strategy assessment process. Document how the analysis was initiated and substantially completed prior to schematic design and how it informed design decisions in the project’s OPR and BOD.
Document where an alternative international or local standard has been used.

OR

Option 2: Emergency Preparedness Planning

Submit the following completed forms signed by Owner:

Red Cross 123 AssessmentTM Form showing that the project has completed a preliminary assessment. Assessment must meet “Strong Preparedness Foundation” levels in Sections One and Two and indicate intention to meet all requirements in all other sections (Three through Five).

Red Cross Facility Description Form

The 123 Assessment form requires responses to preparedness questions but this credit option does not require attaining a designated numerical performance score in the preliminary assessment phase, apart from meeting the “Strong Preparedness Foundation” level for Sections One and Two.

The Red Cross 123 Assessment Form™ and Red Cross Facility Description Form™ of the American Red Cross Ready Rating™ program are available online for free when you create an account (www.readyrating.org). Additionally, a written disclosure to the Red Cross is necessary for consent to share this Assessment with a third-party (GBCI).

1 For projects outside the United States: International projects may use the U.S. standard or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.
2 For projects outside the United States: International projects may use the U.S. standard or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.
3 Issues to Consider: In many cases scientists predict that climate change will make past hazard and climate-related events more frequent and intense. For example, drought, which climate models predict will become more frequent and of longer duration in some areas, increases wildfire risk, as does the die-off of trees that can occur when warming winters fail to keep wood-boring beetles in check, as has occurred in the Northern Rockies in recent decades. With temperature and precipitation reaching new extremes, winter storms and extreme weather events are also expected to be more frequent and intense. As climate and environmental conditions change, associated negative impacts will as well, so damages from past events can be considered as a baseline when considering what's vulnerable.

DEFINITIONS
Winter Storms: include all events identified by NOAA as blizzard, heavy snow, ice storm, lake-effect snow, winter storm, or winter weather. Source: NOAA NCDC Storm Event Database, adopted by FEMA in a reference map.

Cold/Extreme Cold/Wind Chill: events are determined by local and regional meteorologists and standards differ. Source: FEMA

See all forum discussions about this credit »

What does it cost?

Cost estimates for this credit

On each BD+C v4 credit, LEEDuser offers the wisdom of a team of architects, engineers, cost estimators, and LEED experts with hundreds of LEED projects between then. They analyzed the sustainable design strategies associated with each LEED credit, but also to assign actual costs to those strategies.

Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

This information is also available in a full PDF download in The Cost of LEED v4 report.

Learn more about The Cost of LEED v4 »

Documentation toolkit

The motherlode of cheat sheets

LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit is loaded with calculators to help assess credit compliance, tracking spreadsheets for materials, sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions, and examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects for you to check your work against. To get your plaque, start with the right toolkit.

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To encourage designers, planners and building owners/operators to proactively plan before design commences for the potential impacts of natural disasters or disturbances as well as address issues that impact long-term building performance such as changing climate conditions.

Requirements

Complete a Hazard Assessment prerequisite plus at least one of two options: 1) Climate Related Risk Management Planning or 2) Emergency Preparedness Planning. The Hazard Assessment prerequisite and either Planning option shall be initiated and substantially completed in pre-design. Note as climate science understanding has grown, scientists recommend that looking at historical climate records alone especially for precipitation, storms, and temperature should not be used to address future conditions. We recommend taking into account future climate projections as described in Option 1: Climate-Related Risk Management Planning wherever possible based on client and project requirements.

The Hazard Assessment may be used for multiple projects within the same location or campus, but must be less than 6 years old at the time of submittal.

Outside the United States, project teams may use the U.S. standards if applicable or local equivalent standards, whichever are more stringent, and document their equivalence.

PREREQUISITE: Conduct Hazard Assessment for the Project Site

Step One: Identify the potential high risks associated with natural hazards affecting the project site(s) and building function. In some cases these risks may include man-made events, such as power management accidents and direct human action; these are important variables that could be considered in planning.
For jurisdictions with hazard mitigation plans:

Refer to local, county, state and national hazard mitigation plans to identify hazard risks directly or indirectly impacting the project site. For an example of a local hazard mitigation plan see City of Los Angeles 2018 Local Hazard Mitigation Plan

In addition, review site-specific references where available to identify hazard risk modifiers of a particular location (e.g. Flooding, Hurricane, High Winds, Tornado, Earthquake, Tsunami, Wildfire, Drought, Landslides).

  • For general reference, use the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety Home Page (IBHS) Zip Code tool located on their webpage.

For jurisdictions where hazard mitigation plans are not available or for site-specific hazard identification:

Recommend the project team consult with an environmental scientist or qualified risk/compliance officer to address all relevant conditions for the project site where possible. Use the following resources to identify high hazard conditions.

For projects outside the United States:

International projects may use the U.S. standard if applicable or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.

Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge

Identify impacts associated with sea level rise. Consider additional storm surge impacts in connection with hurricanes and tropical storms. Use NOAA SLOSH Model data to interpolate storm surge. In the absence of SLOSH Model data use the Surging Seas Threat Map and Forecasting Tools to establish storm surge scenarios that take into account sea level rise. Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge for 2022 and beyond should use the NOAA 2012 Sea Level Rise year 2080 High Scenario combined with a 1 in 100-year floodplain (Extreme Flood) to determine water levels for planning purposes.

Flooding

Identify flood risk; determine whether project is located within the 500-year floodplain. If that information is not available, use the 100-year floodplain and add three feet (1 meter) to that measurement.

AND

Identify if the project includes a risk to any activity or element for which even a slight chance of flooding would be too great.

Reference:

Hurricane and High-Wind Areas

Identify hurricane and high-wind risk; determine whether project site is located within a hurricane or high-wind susceptible region. In determining the type of risk, distinguish whether the project site has hurricane risk combined with high-wind risk, wind-borne debris, and storm surge, or if is a project site with high-wind (non-hurricane) risk alone.

Hurricane-Prone Regions: Areas vulnerable to hurricanes as defined in ASCE 7 are considered hurricane-prone regions. For ASCE 7-10 and ASCE 7-16, hurricane-prone regions are locations along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coasts where the wind speed for Risk Category II buildings is greater than 115 mph (185 kmh) plus Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and American Samoa. For Risk Categories III and IV, see ASCE 7-10 or 7-16, Chapter 26.

Reference:

Additional Resources:

Tornado

Identify tornado risk; identify whether project site is located above EF3 (136 mph/219 kmh– 156 mph /251 kmh) tornado activity area

References:

Earthquake

Identify seismic risk; determine whether project is within FEMA Earthquake zones SDC C (yellow), D - (orange), or E (red).

References:

If seismic risk is identified in the referenced FEMA zones listed in this pilot credit, where possible, pursue further specific analysis of site and surrounding conditions that will influence seismic hazards, such as soil conditions, adjacent structures, and service to the site.

Consider the secondary hazard of fire-following-earthquake where earthquakes are a high hazard.

Tsunami

Identify tsunami risk; determine whether project is within a tsunami inundation zone1.

Reference:

Wildfire

Identify wildfire risk; determine whether project is located in an area that is designated high or very high wildfire hazard potential. Also consider urban fires in densely populated urban residential areas with older construction without interior sprinklers.

References:

Drought

Identify drought risk; determine whether the project is in U.S. locations that have experienced Moderate, Severe, or Extreme drought conditions for more than 25% of the time in the past 30 years.

Reference:

Landslides and unstable soil

Identify relative landslide, subsidence and liquefaction risk, and critical slopes risk that may indicate unstable soil. Refer to state and local data2 to determine whether the project is located in a high risk landslide area and whether there is land on or uphill of the building site with a slope exceeding 15% (6.75°).

Reference:

Extreme Heat

Identify if project is located in an area subject to extreme heat events.

References:

Winter Storms

Identify if project is located in an area subject to frequent winter storms. Assess whether winter storms could impact essential operations or access to the site.

Reference:

Step Two:

Solicit input from the client on site-specific vulnerabilities to incorporate into the preliminary analysis. Document hazard findings and assess potential exposure, sensitivity and vulnerability to each hazard based on the project goals, program and intended service for the life of the building. Review preliminary findings with the client and project team to determine the top three hazard-related risks for further project planning, or less If fewer than three hazards are identified. If more than three hazard-related risks are identified, project teams may at their option choose to include more than the top three.

Additional General Issues to Consider
Direct Human Actions
Human-induced hazards are events caused by—often intentional—human actions. The impact of these events ranges from disruption of municipal area operations (such as during a strike), to undue use of force by authorities (such in response to peaceful protests), to serious harm at a limited scale (such as during a shooting), to widespread death and destruction at a neighborhood scale (such as during detonation of an improvised explosive device). Civil unrest, government intrusion, strikes, active shootings, and improvised explosive devices are some of the human-induced hazards that a facility may face. Additionally as our energy infrastructure becomes more complex and increasingly controlled by Internet-based, "smart" technology, there are more points of accidental failure and also risk of hacking into controls.

While specific requirements for resilience measures related to direct human actions and equipment malfunctions for other reasons are not included in this credit, design teams are encouraged to address passive survivability measures covered in LEED Resilience Pilot Credit IPpc100.

Consider conducting a Comprehensive Safety Report which outlines risks associated with some of the most disruptive Human Induced Hazards.

ACHIEVE ONE OF THE TWO FOLLOWING OPTIONS, IN ADDITION TO THE PREREQUISITE
OPTION 1: Climate Related Risk Management Planning

Step One:

Complete a vulnerability assessment of impacts associated with climate change over the long-term service life of the project in order to ensure reliable performance of the project’s mission and operations in changing conditions.

Use the following resources to help determine future climate impacts:

For regions where local climate change studies are available:

Refer to regional, state, provincial and local governments’ climate change studies that identify local vulnerabilities. In all cases where equivalent standards are used, identify them in the documentation.

For projects outside the United States where local climate change studies are not available:

Consult with a climate scientist, or qualified risk/compliance officer to address all relevant conditions for the project site where possible; International projects may use the U.S. standard or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.

For United States regions where local climate change studies are not available or for additional information:

Consider the following resources to identify vulnerability conditions. Consult with a climate scientist or qualified risk/compliance officer to address all relevant conditions for the project site where possible.

General Climate Change U.S. Regional Predictions3

General References:

Riverine Flood Projections

Identify if project is located in an area identified as a long-term (10 - 50 years or longer) flood risk.
Identify if there is a greater than 50% long-term flood risk per the following.

Resources:

Temperature, Precipitation and Degree Day Projections

Identify the range of project temperature, precipitation and degree day changes based on project service life.

Resources:

  • Climate Explorer: provides temperature, precipitation and degree days climate projections by zip code for each county in the U.S.:
  • 2017 Climate Science Special Report, Fourth National Climate Assessment Chapters 6 and 7
  • For Alaska and parts of Canada: SNAP

For projects outside the U.S.:

Extreme Weather Events

With temperature and precipitation reaching new extremes, winter storms and extreme weather events are becoming more frequent and intense. Consider the potential impacts.

Resources:

Step Two:

Undertake a climate risk management analysis to identify any climate risk factors that the project should take into account in the project planning and design. Look at the project location, goals, and program along with degree of exposure and sensitivity to identify which climate change vulnerabilities are of highest priority. Use the Climate Related Risk Management Planning Template to guide your discussion

  • Take into account the expected service life of the project and identify vulnerabilities based on changes predicted to take place during that time period.
  • Work with the client to establish the risk tolerance for climate projections. For example, if the facility is one with a long-term service life and high priority functions, it may warrant a higher climate projection scenario.
  • Consider using the IBC Risk Category Designations to help determine risk tolerance.
  • Consider the adaptive capacity to address the potential vulnerabilities. Robust infrastructure and strong social networks are two factors that can reduce vulnerability.
  • Since the outcomes from high wind events, winter storms or extreme heat events often result in temporary loss of power, design teams are strongly encouraged to address passive survivability measures covered in Resilience Pilot Credit IPpc100.
Step Three:

Based on the climate risk factors identified, develop preliminary project site selection (if possible), programming, planning and design parameters to reduce vulnerability or increase resilience to climate and natural resource conditions for the project. Address the following topics as applicable:

  • Project location and elevation
  • Adjacent site features and development
  • Availability of and access to services and infrastructure
  • Building envelope performance requirements
  • Building materials
  • Passive systems
  • Site design
  • Passive survivability (see Resilience pilot credit IPpc100)
  • Other systems

For future Best Practices, but not required in this credit, consider:

  • Include thresholds in planning to monitor the project as climate conditions change.
  • Development of a phased adaptation plan that proposes decadal timing to adapt the enclosure to reduce heating and cooling loads over time based on projected changes of extreme temperatures

General Reference:

See the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit for process recommendations, many valuable tools and resources and best practice case studies.

OPTION 2: Emergency Preparedness Planning

Ensure that project owner or facility management staff have evaluated their emergency preparedness and that a measurable assessment program is in place for continuous improvement. This evaluation and assessment program shall be initiated and substantially completed in pre-design.

Prepare the Red Cross 123 Assessment and Facility Description Forms™ to identify the specific emergency preparedness features of the building and planning process.

Documentation

General

Register for the pilot credit

Participate in the LEEDuser pilot credit forum

Complete the feedback survey:
Pilot Credit Survey

Credit Specific
Prerequisite: Conduct Hazard Assessment for the Project Site

Submit the completed Assessment and Planning for Resilience Workbook that summarizes the hazard identification, reference documents, and determination of priorities. Attach any site-specific custom analyses developed. Demonstrate that analysis was initiated and substantially completed in pre-design.

Where an alternative international standard has been used, document its equivalence with the applicable US-based standard.

AND

Option 1: Climate Related Risk Management Planning

Submit the completed Climate Related Risk Management Planning template, found in the Assessment and Planning for Resilience Workbook, that summarizes the vulnerability identification and strategy assessment process. Document how the analysis was initiated and substantially completed prior to schematic design and how it informed design decisions in the project’s OPR and BOD.
Document where an alternative international or local standard has been used.

OR

Option 2: Emergency Preparedness Planning

Submit the following completed forms signed by Owner:

Red Cross 123 AssessmentTM Form showing that the project has completed a preliminary assessment. Assessment must meet “Strong Preparedness Foundation” levels in Sections One and Two and indicate intention to meet all requirements in all other sections (Three through Five).

Red Cross Facility Description Form

The 123 Assessment form requires responses to preparedness questions but this credit option does not require attaining a designated numerical performance score in the preliminary assessment phase, apart from meeting the “Strong Preparedness Foundation” level for Sections One and Two.

The Red Cross 123 Assessment Form™ and Red Cross Facility Description Form™ of the American Red Cross Ready Rating™ program are available online for free when you create an account (www.readyrating.org). Additionally, a written disclosure to the Red Cross is necessary for consent to share this Assessment with a third-party (GBCI).

1 For projects outside the United States: International projects may use the U.S. standard or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.
2 For projects outside the United States: International projects may use the U.S. standard or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.
3 Issues to Consider: In many cases scientists predict that climate change will make past hazard and climate-related events more frequent and intense. For example, drought, which climate models predict will become more frequent and of longer duration in some areas, increases wildfire risk, as does the die-off of trees that can occur when warming winters fail to keep wood-boring beetles in check, as has occurred in the Northern Rockies in recent decades. With temperature and precipitation reaching new extremes, winter storms and extreme weather events are also expected to be more frequent and intense. As climate and environmental conditions change, associated negative impacts will as well, so damages from past events can be considered as a baseline when considering what's vulnerable.

DEFINITIONS
Winter Storms: include all events identified by NOAA as blizzard, heavy snow, ice storm, lake-effect snow, winter storm, or winter weather. Source: NOAA NCDC Storm Event Database, adopted by FEMA in a reference map.

Cold/Extreme Cold/Wind Chill: events are determined by local and regional meteorologists and standards differ. Source: FEMA

See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Subscribe to new discussions about Pilot-Credits IPpc98