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Process-Related Pilot Credits
Residential Inclusive Design

LEED CREDIT

Pilot-Credits IPpc135: Residential Inclusive Design 1 point

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Post your questions on this credit in the forum, and click on the credit language tab to review to the LEED requirements.

Credit language

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To encourage the design of spaces that “empower a diverse population by improving human performance, health and wellness, and social participation1”; to increase physical access for people with disabilities beyond federal, state, or local regulations.

Requirements

For All Projects:
Inclusive Design Process: Encourage responsiveness to community needs by involving the people who live or work in the community and project in decisions surrounding the design and planning of the project. At a minimum, engage the community and future occupants through user groups. Each activity must be led by the project team or in partnership with an existing local organization and be directly related to the project. Refer to the following for best practices for community engagement:

AND

For a minimum 20% of the residential units, meet requirements for at least three of the four categories of inclusive design features listed below (ie. General Physical Access; Entrance, Door and Gate; Kitchen; Bedroom and Bathroom Features). If a project meets the suggested strategies for physical access through local regulatory requirements, choose four additional requirement options from the other feature categories.

  1. General Physical Access Features

    Include at least five of the following features:
    • Easy-grip cabinet hardware;
    • Easy-grip locking mechanisms on doors and windows;
    • A single-lever faucet control at all sinks;
    • Rocker or hands-free switches;
    • Motion sensor lighting at entrances, in hallways, stairways, closets, garages, utility spaces, and basements;
    • House or unit addresses in large, high-contrast print;
    • A built-in shelf, bench, or table with knee space below, located on the exterior side of the entry door with weather protection overhead;
    • Color contrast between stair treads and risers;
    • Interior floor surfaces (e.g., low-pile carpets, hard-surface flooring) that provide easy passage and transitions for people with a wheelchair, walker, or other assistive devices;
    • Color contrast between floor surfaces and adjacent vertical surfaces.

  2. Entrance, Door, and Gate Features

    Include all of the following features:
    • Lever door hardware that requires no more than 5 lbs. (2 kg) of force to operate;
    • Non-slip floor or ground surface at entrances, on stairs, and in bathrooms and kitchens;
    • Where possible, include at least one power door opener with an operator actuator.

  3. Kitchen Features

    On the main floor of the home or unit (or on another floor if accessible by elevator), provide a kitchen with a single-lever sink faucet and a 67-in. (170-cm) diameter turning space, at minimum.

    In addition, include at least four of the following features:
    • An adjustable-height work surface that can be adjusted from 28 in. (70 cm) to 42 in. (107 cm) above-finished-floor (AFF);
    • An adjustable-height sink and surrounding counter that can be adjusted from 28 in. (70 cm) to 42 in. (107 cm) AFF;
    • Knee space under the adjustable sink and work surface at a minimum 30 in. (76 cm) wide and 19 in. deep (48 cm), with a minimum toe kick height of 12 in. (30 cm);
    • Controls on cooking appliances with color-contrasting markings and tactile features;
    • A toe kick at the base of the cabinets with a minimum height of 9 in. (23 cm);
    • Full-extension drawers and swing-out shelves;
    • Adjustable-height shelves in wall cabinets;
    • Contrasting color treatment between the countertop surface and the floor;
    • Glare-free countertop surfaces;
    • Task lighting above countertop surfaces;
    • Rounded edges on counters.

  4. Bedroom and Bathroom Features

    On the main floor of the home or unit (or on another floor if accessible by elevator), comply with the following requirements.

    In at least one bedroom, include all of the following features:
    • A 67-in. (170-cm) diameter turning space;
    • At least one closet with a 32-in. (80-cm) clear opening, adjustable height rods, and shelves.
  5. In at least one full bathroom on the same floor as the bedroom above, include all of the following features:
  • 30-in. by 52-in. (76-cm by 132-cm) clear floor space within the bathroom and beyond the door swing;
  • A mirror with the bottom edge of the reflective surface no more than 36 in. (90 cm) AFF and top edge of the reflective surface no less than 72 in. (182 cm) AFF.
In all bathrooms, include all of the following features:
  • Single-lever faucets at sinks;
  • Handheld showerheads and non-slip s where bathing fixtures are installed;
  • Reinforce walls around toilets and bathing fixtures to accommodate grab bars that may be installed in the future.
Alternative Compliance Path for Mexico & United States:
Projects may achieve Todo Accesible’s Distintivo A label at the Silver level or above. Projects must submit their completed checklist and label, email confirmation, and a photo of their installed plaque.
Alternative Compliance Path for Boston, Massachusetts:
Any project subject to Boston Zoning Article 80 Small or Large Project Review, including Institutional Master Plan modifications and updates, may submit the City of Boston Mayor’s Commission for Persons with Disabilities Accessibility Checklist (which includes descriptions, diagrams and data) as documentation to achieve this credit. Projects must submit their completed checklist and an email confirmation.
Alternative Compliance Path for Canada:
Projects may achieve the Rick Hansen Foundation Accessibility CertificationTM at the Gold level. Projects must submit the project’s scorecard, letter of certification, and a photo of their installed plaque or electronic label.
Global Alternative Compliance Path:
USGBC welcomes the idea of alternative strategies to those discussed in the credit language for this pilot credit, as a means to learn more about other possibilities towards meeting the intent and goals of the credit, and in order to potentially incorporate good ideas into future pilot credits and/or standard LEED credits. For an alternative certification program to be considered, it must relate to the inclusive design issues in the pilot credit requirements. The following information must be included in the submission:
  1. Intent of the proposed strategy: How does it meet the intent and goals of this pilot credit?
  2. Requirements for compliance: What metric(s) are used to measure success? How is the level of effort or rigor equivalent to the existing options?
  3. Submittals: What is the documentation to demonstrate compliance?
  4. Design approach or strategies: Provide a narrative description if not sufficiently addressed in the information listed above.
[1] Universal Design: Creating Inclusive Environments by Steinfeld, E., & Maisel, J. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2012

Submittals

General
Register for the pilot credit Feedback Survey

Credit Specific Documentation:

  • Inclusive Design Plan (narrative) that details the inclusive design process and the three categories of design features selected for the project, providing justification for any elements not addressed or any additional elements unique to the project.
  • Drawings (site plans, floor plans, sections, elevations) and/or photos/renderings calling out the inclusive design strategies that will be/were implemented on the project.
Pilot Credit Survey Questions:
  1. To what extent would you have included these features if they were not rewarded via this pilot credit?
  2. How did the credit requirements change the floor plan layouts and other space distribution considerations?
  3. Did the local building codes and/or zoning impede your achievement of any requirements of this credit? If so, which and how?
  4. Did the local building codes and/or zoning codes facilitate your achievement of any requirements? If so, which and how?
  5. How might project teams monitor the use and success of the inclusive design features and/or programs?
  6. What other design considerations would you suggest for this credit, for future teams, and/or have you included in your project?
Changes
  • 4/10/20 - Original Publication
See all forum discussions about this credit »

What does it cost?

Cost estimates for this credit

On each BD+C v4 credit, LEEDuser offers the wisdom of a team of architects, engineers, cost estimators, and LEED experts with hundreds of LEED projects between then. They analyzed the sustainable design strategies associated with each LEED credit, but also to assign actual costs to those strategies.

Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

This information is also available in a full PDF download in The Cost of LEED v4 report.

Learn more about The Cost of LEED v4 »

Documentation toolkit

The motherlode of cheat sheets

LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit is loaded with calculators to help assess credit compliance, tracking spreadsheets for materials, sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions, and examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects for you to check your work against. To get your plaque, start with the right toolkit.

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To encourage the design of spaces that “empower a diverse population by improving human performance, health and wellness, and social participation1”; to increase physical access for people with disabilities beyond federal, state, or local regulations.

Requirements

For All Projects:
Inclusive Design Process: Encourage responsiveness to community needs by involving the people who live or work in the community and project in decisions surrounding the design and planning of the project. At a minimum, engage the community and future occupants through user groups. Each activity must be led by the project team or in partnership with an existing local organization and be directly related to the project. Refer to the following for best practices for community engagement:

AND

For a minimum 20% of the residential units, meet requirements for at least three of the four categories of inclusive design features listed below (ie. General Physical Access; Entrance, Door and Gate; Kitchen; Bedroom and Bathroom Features). If a project meets the suggested strategies for physical access through local regulatory requirements, choose four additional requirement options from the other feature categories.

  1. General Physical Access Features

    Include at least five of the following features:
    • Easy-grip cabinet hardware;
    • Easy-grip locking mechanisms on doors and windows;
    • A single-lever faucet control at all sinks;
    • Rocker or hands-free switches;
    • Motion sensor lighting at entrances, in hallways, stairways, closets, garages, utility spaces, and basements;
    • House or unit addresses in large, high-contrast print;
    • A built-in shelf, bench, or table with knee space below, located on the exterior side of the entry door with weather protection overhead;
    • Color contrast between stair treads and risers;
    • Interior floor surfaces (e.g., low-pile carpets, hard-surface flooring) that provide easy passage and transitions for people with a wheelchair, walker, or other assistive devices;
    • Color contrast between floor surfaces and adjacent vertical surfaces.

  2. Entrance, Door, and Gate Features

    Include all of the following features:
    • Lever door hardware that requires no more than 5 lbs. (2 kg) of force to operate;
    • Non-slip floor or ground surface at entrances, on stairs, and in bathrooms and kitchens;
    • Where possible, include at least one power door opener with an operator actuator.

  3. Kitchen Features

    On the main floor of the home or unit (or on another floor if accessible by elevator), provide a kitchen with a single-lever sink faucet and a 67-in. (170-cm) diameter turning space, at minimum.

    In addition, include at least four of the following features:
    • An adjustable-height work surface that can be adjusted from 28 in. (70 cm) to 42 in. (107 cm) above-finished-floor (AFF);
    • An adjustable-height sink and surrounding counter that can be adjusted from 28 in. (70 cm) to 42 in. (107 cm) AFF;
    • Knee space under the adjustable sink and work surface at a minimum 30 in. (76 cm) wide and 19 in. deep (48 cm), with a minimum toe kick height of 12 in. (30 cm);
    • Controls on cooking appliances with color-contrasting markings and tactile features;
    • A toe kick at the base of the cabinets with a minimum height of 9 in. (23 cm);
    • Full-extension drawers and swing-out shelves;
    • Adjustable-height shelves in wall cabinets;
    • Contrasting color treatment between the countertop surface and the floor;
    • Glare-free countertop surfaces;
    • Task lighting above countertop surfaces;
    • Rounded edges on counters.

  4. Bedroom and Bathroom Features

    On the main floor of the home or unit (or on another floor if accessible by elevator), comply with the following requirements.

    In at least one bedroom, include all of the following features:
    • A 67-in. (170-cm) diameter turning space;
    • At least one closet with a 32-in. (80-cm) clear opening, adjustable height rods, and shelves.
  5. In at least one full bathroom on the same floor as the bedroom above, include all of the following features:
  • 30-in. by 52-in. (76-cm by 132-cm) clear floor space within the bathroom and beyond the door swing;
  • A mirror with the bottom edge of the reflective surface no more than 36 in. (90 cm) AFF and top edge of the reflective surface no less than 72 in. (182 cm) AFF.
In all bathrooms, include all of the following features:
  • Single-lever faucets at sinks;
  • Handheld showerheads and non-slip s where bathing fixtures are installed;
  • Reinforce walls around toilets and bathing fixtures to accommodate grab bars that may be installed in the future.
Alternative Compliance Path for Mexico & United States:
Projects may achieve Todo Accesible’s Distintivo A label at the Silver level or above. Projects must submit their completed checklist and label, email confirmation, and a photo of their installed plaque.
Alternative Compliance Path for Boston, Massachusetts:
Any project subject to Boston Zoning Article 80 Small or Large Project Review, including Institutional Master Plan modifications and updates, may submit the City of Boston Mayor’s Commission for Persons with Disabilities Accessibility Checklist (which includes descriptions, diagrams and data) as documentation to achieve this credit. Projects must submit their completed checklist and an email confirmation.
Alternative Compliance Path for Canada:
Projects may achieve the Rick Hansen Foundation Accessibility CertificationTM at the Gold level. Projects must submit the project’s scorecard, letter of certification, and a photo of their installed plaque or electronic label.
Global Alternative Compliance Path:
USGBC welcomes the idea of alternative strategies to those discussed in the credit language for this pilot credit, as a means to learn more about other possibilities towards meeting the intent and goals of the credit, and in order to potentially incorporate good ideas into future pilot credits and/or standard LEED credits. For an alternative certification program to be considered, it must relate to the inclusive design issues in the pilot credit requirements. The following information must be included in the submission:
  1. Intent of the proposed strategy: How does it meet the intent and goals of this pilot credit?
  2. Requirements for compliance: What metric(s) are used to measure success? How is the level of effort or rigor equivalent to the existing options?
  3. Submittals: What is the documentation to demonstrate compliance?
  4. Design approach or strategies: Provide a narrative description if not sufficiently addressed in the information listed above.
[1] Universal Design: Creating Inclusive Environments by Steinfeld, E., & Maisel, J. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2012

Submittals

General
Register for the pilot credit Feedback Survey

Credit Specific Documentation:

  • Inclusive Design Plan (narrative) that details the inclusive design process and the three categories of design features selected for the project, providing justification for any elements not addressed or any additional elements unique to the project.
  • Drawings (site plans, floor plans, sections, elevations) and/or photos/renderings calling out the inclusive design strategies that will be/were implemented on the project.
Pilot Credit Survey Questions:
  1. To what extent would you have included these features if they were not rewarded via this pilot credit?
  2. How did the credit requirements change the floor plan layouts and other space distribution considerations?
  3. Did the local building codes and/or zoning impede your achievement of any requirements of this credit? If so, which and how?
  4. Did the local building codes and/or zoning codes facilitate your achievement of any requirements? If so, which and how?
  5. How might project teams monitor the use and success of the inclusive design features and/or programs?
  6. What other design considerations would you suggest for this credit, for future teams, and/or have you included in your project?
Changes
  • 4/10/20 - Original Publication
See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Subscribe to new discussions about Pilot-Credits IPpc135