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LEED Pilot Credits
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Process-Related Pilot Credits
Integrative Process for Health Promotion

LEED CREDIT

Pilot-Credits IPpc108: Integrative Process for Health Promotion 1 point

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Post your questions on this credit in the forum, and click on the credit language tab to review to the LEED requirements.

Credit language

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To support high-performance, cost-effective and health-promoting project outcomes through an early analysis of the interrelationships among building systems. To facilitate a systematic consideration of the impact that project design and construction has on health and well-being (including physical, mental and social impacts).

Requirements

Beginning in pre-design and continuing throughout the design phases, identify and use opportunities to achieve synergies that promote health across disciplines and building systems. Team with a public health partner to use the analyses described below to inform the owner’s project requirements (OPR), basis of design (BOD), design documents, and construction documents. Document how this analysis informed design and building form decisions, including modifications that were made in response to the findings and recommended strategies that were identified.

PUBLIC HEALTH PARTNER

Identify and team with a public health partner appropriate for the project. A public health partner can be an individual professional or public health department or organization whose work, experience, and training are focused specifically on public health.

DISCOVERY

Perform a preliminary analysis before the completion of schematic design that explores how to promote health (physical, mental and social/economic well-being) and accomplish related sustainability goals by questioning default assumptions. Identify the community that will be impacted by the project and conduct research to characterize critical health issues and existing environmental health hazards affecting the community (including social, environmental, and economic factors that impact health). During this analysis, consider the disparate impact that project design and construction could have on vulnerable community members. Engage public health partners and community stakeholders to discover how this project could address community health needs and reduce any existing health inequities.

IMPLEMENTATION

In collaboration with community stakeholders and a public health professional, identify, select and implement achievable strategies to address existing health needs and minimize project features that could present risks to health. Consider strategies at multiple scales across green building practice including site selection, landscape design, and interior design.

Keep in mind that such strategies appropriate for addressing health needs and reducing risk are found in many existing LEED credits and credits within other rating systems. The process represented by this credit is a means of strategically selecting strategies to maximize impact.

To the extent possible, consider linkages between the project’s design and operations particularly as it relates to potential health and wellness programming. Prioritize strategies based on research gathered during the discovery phase and document how the discovery phase informed the project’s OPR and BOD and the eventual design of the project.

Finally, collaborate with a public health partner to develop a monitoring plan with performance metrics to evaluate the project’s impact on health throughout the project life cycle (design, construction and operations). The project team is not responsible for implementation of monitoring, nor is execution of the monitoring required. The purpose of the monitoring plan is to demonstrate that design and optional programming strategies were developed to achieve specific health needs or goals, and that these strategies have an intentional desired outcome that could be measured.

See the guide tab for step by step instructions.

Creation of this pilot credit was supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to the University of Virginia School of Medicine and the U.S. Green Building Council. The pilot credit was developed in partnership with the Health Impact Project, a collaboration of RWJF and The Pew Charitable Trusts, and Enterprise Green Communities. This pilot credit is aligned with criterion 1.2B in the 2015 Enterprise Green Communities Criteria.

For more information contact greenhealthpartnership.org.

Submittals

General

Register for the pilot credit

Credits 106-115

Documentation/Submittals:

See the guide tab for documentation instructions.

Changes
  • 5/30/2018: removed assistance paragraph, assistance grant no longer available.
  • 1/9/2017: Updated text to include information on assistance and more detailed documentation guidance

Not pursuing this pilot but have a comment you'd like to share with USGBC?

Click here to submit your comment

See all forum discussions about this credit »

What does it cost?

Cost estimates for this credit

On each BD+C v4 credit, LEEDuser offers the wisdom of a team of architects, engineers, cost estimators, and LEED experts with hundreds of LEED projects between then. They analyzed the sustainable design strategies associated with each LEED credit, but also to assign actual costs to those strategies.

Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

This information is also available in a full PDF download in The Cost of LEED v4 report.

Learn more about The Cost of LEED v4 »

Documentation toolkit

The motherlode of cheat sheets

LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit is loaded with calculators to help assess credit compliance, tracking spreadsheets for materials, sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions, and examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects for you to check your work against. To get your plaque, start with the right toolkit.

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To support high-performance, cost-effective and health-promoting project outcomes through an early analysis of the interrelationships among building systems. To facilitate a systematic consideration of the impact that project design and construction has on health and well-being (including physical, mental and social impacts).

Requirements

Beginning in pre-design and continuing throughout the design phases, identify and use opportunities to achieve synergies that promote health across disciplines and building systems. Team with a public health partner to use the analyses described below to inform the owner’s project requirements (OPR), basis of design (BOD), design documents, and construction documents. Document how this analysis informed design and building form decisions, including modifications that were made in response to the findings and recommended strategies that were identified.

PUBLIC HEALTH PARTNER

Identify and team with a public health partner appropriate for the project. A public health partner can be an individual professional or public health department or organization whose work, experience, and training are focused specifically on public health.

DISCOVERY

Perform a preliminary analysis before the completion of schematic design that explores how to promote health (physical, mental and social/economic well-being) and accomplish related sustainability goals by questioning default assumptions. Identify the community that will be impacted by the project and conduct research to characterize critical health issues and existing environmental health hazards affecting the community (including social, environmental, and economic factors that impact health). During this analysis, consider the disparate impact that project design and construction could have on vulnerable community members. Engage public health partners and community stakeholders to discover how this project could address community health needs and reduce any existing health inequities.

IMPLEMENTATION

In collaboration with community stakeholders and a public health professional, identify, select and implement achievable strategies to address existing health needs and minimize project features that could present risks to health. Consider strategies at multiple scales across green building practice including site selection, landscape design, and interior design.

Keep in mind that such strategies appropriate for addressing health needs and reducing risk are found in many existing LEED credits and credits within other rating systems. The process represented by this credit is a means of strategically selecting strategies to maximize impact.

To the extent possible, consider linkages between the project’s design and operations particularly as it relates to potential health and wellness programming. Prioritize strategies based on research gathered during the discovery phase and document how the discovery phase informed the project’s OPR and BOD and the eventual design of the project.

Finally, collaborate with a public health partner to develop a monitoring plan with performance metrics to evaluate the project’s impact on health throughout the project life cycle (design, construction and operations). The project team is not responsible for implementation of monitoring, nor is execution of the monitoring required. The purpose of the monitoring plan is to demonstrate that design and optional programming strategies were developed to achieve specific health needs or goals, and that these strategies have an intentional desired outcome that could be measured.

See the guide tab for step by step instructions.

Creation of this pilot credit was supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to the University of Virginia School of Medicine and the U.S. Green Building Council. The pilot credit was developed in partnership with the Health Impact Project, a collaboration of RWJF and The Pew Charitable Trusts, and Enterprise Green Communities. This pilot credit is aligned with criterion 1.2B in the 2015 Enterprise Green Communities Criteria.

For more information contact greenhealthpartnership.org.

Submittals

General

Register for the pilot credit

Credits 106-115

Documentation/Submittals:

See the guide tab for documentation instructions.

Changes
  • 5/30/2018: removed assistance paragraph, assistance grant no longer available.
  • 1/9/2017: Updated text to include information on assistance and more detailed documentation guidance

Not pursuing this pilot but have a comment you'd like to share with USGBC?

Click here to submit your comment

See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Subscribe to new discussions about Pilot-Credits IPpc108