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Safety First: Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Space

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Pilot-Credits INpc137: Safety First: Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Space 1 point

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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

These special pilot credits are awarded based on project teams attempting to meet the requirements to the best of their ability and providing feedback on the requirements. The credits may change as feedback is received.

To provide effective cleaning and disinfecting relative to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), during re-occupancy and during operations while minimizing adverse health impacts on cleaning personnel, building occupants and visitors; and the environment.

Requirements

Create and implement policy and practices that focuses on a healthy environment by following green cleaning best practices AND meets the guidelines of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency relative to COVID-19. This includes the procurement of cleaning and disinfecting products, procedures and training for cleaning personnel, occupant education, and services that are within the project and site management’s control.

In the policy, at a minimum, include the following cleaning best practices to ensure a healthy indoor environment:

Product selection

  • When disinfecting against SARS-CoV2, use disinfectants that are on EPA’s List N: Disinfectants for Use Against SARS-CoV-2 and formulated with the active ingredients recommended by EPA’s Design for the Environment Logo for Antimicrobial Pesticide Products. (As of May 2020, the active ingredient list includes: Hydrogen Peroxide, Citric Acid, L-lactic Acid, Ethanol, Isopropanol, Peroxyacetic acid, and Sodium Bisulfate). If concentrated disinfectants are used and diluted to the proper use-solution utilizing a portion control device, put in place a testing protocol to ensure that the correct dilution rate is being achieved. Inexpensive test strips (under ten cents each) are available for many commonly used disinfectants (e.g. hydrogen peroxide and quats). Note: If test strips are not available for the disinfectant being used (e.g. citric acid and lactic acid) or if purchasing ready-to-use products, the use of test strips is not required.
  • Use of cleaning chemical products that meet EPA Safer Choice Standard, Green Seal standards GS-37, GS-40, GS-52/53, or UL Ecologo 2792, 2795, 2777, 2798, 2791, 2796, 2759 or cleaning devices that use only water, ionized water, electrolyzed water, or aqueous ozone and have third-party-verified performance data equivalent to the other standards mentioned above (if the device is marketed for antimicrobial cleaning, performance data must demonstrate antimicrobial performance comparable to EPA Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics and Design for the Environment requirements, as appropriate for use patterns and marketing claims).
  • Use of hand soaps that that meet one or more of the following standards: EPA safer choice, Green Seal GS-41, UL Ecologo 2784, or soaps with no antimicrobial agents (other than as a preservative) except where required by health codes and other regulations (e.g., food service and health care requirements).
  • In areas where soap and water are not available, use of hand sanitizers that contain at least 60% alcohol and meet one or more of the following standards: UL Ecologo 2783.
  • Use paper towels, wiping/drying products, mops, buckets and other tools that meet one or more of the following standards: EPA comprehensive procurement guidelines for janitor paper and plastic trash can liners, Green Seal GS-01 for tissue paper, paper towels and napkins, UL Ecologo 175 for toilet tissue and hand towels, janitorial paper products derived from rapidly renewable resources or made from tree-free fibers; FSC certification for fiber procurement, California integrated waste management requirements, for plastic trash can liners (California Code of Regulations Title 14, Chapter 4, Article 5, or SABRC 42290-42297 Recycled Content Plastic Trash Bag Program).
  • Use of cleaning equipment that has ergonomic design features to reduce worker injuries such as vibration, noise, and user fatigue. For examples of ergonomic design features, see EQ credit powered cleaning equipment.
  • If you are deploying other procedures that could be beneficial please share that with us at usgbc.org.
Procedures on cleaning and disinfection
  • Use of procedures that meet the joint requirements of CDC and EPA on Reopening Guidance for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplaces, Businesses, Schools, and Homes.
  • Use of procedures that optimize cleaning personnel resources and minimize unnecessary use of valuable cleaning products and equipment. Do not overuse or stockpile disinfectants or other supplies. Where possible, adjust spaces to minimize frequently touched surfaces and regularly update cleaning personnel on occupant activities in the building to ensure their cleaning aligns with the way the building is being used.
  • Identification of “high-touch surfaces” along with frequencies for cleaning and disinfecting the different objects so designated.
  • Procedure for quantitative testing of the cleanliness of surfaces.
  • Strategies for promoting and improving hand hygiene, including prioritizing thorough washing of hands with plain soap and water over hand sanitizers where possible.
  • If you are deploying other procedures that could be beneficial please share that with us at usgbc.org.
Protection for cleaning personnel
  • Use of proper personnel protective equipment (PPE) including eye protection, masks, gloves and gowns for all cleaning personnel as required by the products and processes being used, face coverings, as well as the requirements of the buildings and its occupants relative to COVID-19.
  • Use of tools, equipment and procedures that reduce ergonomic injuries to workers (e.g. injuries to the back, shoulders and knees).
  • If you are deploying other procedures that could be beneficial please share that with us at usgbc.org.
Training of cleaning personnel
  • Use of disinfectants and other cleaning products and equipment.
  • Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) including how to properly put it on, take it off and disposal.
  • Training on the hazards of the cleaning chemicals used in the workplace in accordance with OSHA’s Hazard Communication standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) and comply with OSHA’s standards on Bloodborne Pathogens (29 CFR 1910.1030), including proper disposal of regulated waste, and PPE (29 CFR 1910.132).
  • Training on the basics of infection control and the science of cleaning; personal protective equipment (PPE); ergonomics protection for workers; hazards of disinfectant and other chemical products; disposal of cleaning chemicals; proper use and maintenance of chemical dispensing equipment; and proper training on other products and equipment used in the cleaning process.
  • Train cleaning personnel to be able to answer occupant’s basic questions about cleaning procedures.
  • If you are deploying other procedures that could be beneficial please share that with us at usgbc.org.
Note: The following training programs meet the above requirements:
  • Thomas Shortman Training Fund: Cleaning for COVID-19 & other Infectious Diseases
  • Building Skills Partnership: Infectious Disease Certification Program
  • Building Service Contractors Association International (BSCAI): COVID-19 Disinfection & Safety Course
Occupant Education
  • Provide occupant education to ensure understanding of the steps taken to disinfect and clean the space.

The COVID-19 (Coronavirus) outbreak is an ongoing, developing situation with a rapidly changing legal and regulatory landscape; the information and guidance provided in the LEED Safety First Pilot Credits may at any time not be current and USGBC does not guarantee the accuracy of the information. In preparing this guidance and its conclusions and recommendations, USGBC has tried to incorporate the best available information at the time the guidance was prepared. The results of future studies may require revisions to the recommendations in this guidance.

The recommendations included in the LEED Safety First Pilot Credits do not set a standard, nor should they be deemed either inclusive of all proper methods or exclusive of other methods for workplace reentry. The ultimate judgment regarding the utility of any specific approach and when it is safe to re-enter workspaces must be made by you in light of all circumstances and variables.

USGBC encourages projects teams and owners to monitor publicly available information and to always follow federal, state and local health organization guidance and government mandates. Where appropriate, you should seek the advice of an appropriate licensed professional or relevant government office in your location for advice on current laws and regulations.

Submittals

General
Register for the pilot credit Feedback Survey
Documentation/Compliance
  • Description of the green cleaning approach implemented by the project team, including a timeline outlining when new practices were put in place for COVID-19, and copy of the green cleaning policy or program.
  • List of cleaning products and materials used or purchased to clean the building and associated compliant green cleaning criteria (also indicate when products are non-compliant).
  • Description of the training program for cleaning personnel. Include training details for the proper application of disinfectants and the use of personal protective equipment for cleaning personnel (If one of the above-mentioned training programs is used, these additional training details are not required).
  • Description of surface testing process with a sample of the test results.
  • Description of occupant education.
Changes
  • 5/19/20 - Original Publication
  • 7/23/20:
    • Added clarification for use of test strips with concentrated disinfectants
    • Added missing option for janitor paper products (option is available in O+M v4.1 and was accidentally left out of pilot credit requirements)
    • Added note with available industry trainings for cleaning personnel
    See all forum discussions about this credit »

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    USGBC logo

    © Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

    Intent

    These special pilot credits are awarded based on project teams attempting to meet the requirements to the best of their ability and providing feedback on the requirements. The credits may change as feedback is received.

    To provide effective cleaning and disinfecting relative to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), during re-occupancy and during operations while minimizing adverse health impacts on cleaning personnel, building occupants and visitors; and the environment.

    Requirements

    Create and implement policy and practices that focuses on a healthy environment by following green cleaning best practices AND meets the guidelines of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency relative to COVID-19. This includes the procurement of cleaning and disinfecting products, procedures and training for cleaning personnel, occupant education, and services that are within the project and site management’s control.

    In the policy, at a minimum, include the following cleaning best practices to ensure a healthy indoor environment:

    Product selection

    • When disinfecting against SARS-CoV2, use disinfectants that are on EPA’s List N: Disinfectants for Use Against SARS-CoV-2 and formulated with the active ingredients recommended by EPA’s Design for the Environment Logo for Antimicrobial Pesticide Products. (As of May 2020, the active ingredient list includes: Hydrogen Peroxide, Citric Acid, L-lactic Acid, Ethanol, Isopropanol, Peroxyacetic acid, and Sodium Bisulfate). If concentrated disinfectants are used and diluted to the proper use-solution utilizing a portion control device, put in place a testing protocol to ensure that the correct dilution rate is being achieved. Inexpensive test strips (under ten cents each) are available for many commonly used disinfectants (e.g. hydrogen peroxide and quats). Note: If test strips are not available for the disinfectant being used (e.g. citric acid and lactic acid) or if purchasing ready-to-use products, the use of test strips is not required.
    • Use of cleaning chemical products that meet EPA Safer Choice Standard, Green Seal standards GS-37, GS-40, GS-52/53, or UL Ecologo 2792, 2795, 2777, 2798, 2791, 2796, 2759 or cleaning devices that use only water, ionized water, electrolyzed water, or aqueous ozone and have third-party-verified performance data equivalent to the other standards mentioned above (if the device is marketed for antimicrobial cleaning, performance data must demonstrate antimicrobial performance comparable to EPA Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics and Design for the Environment requirements, as appropriate for use patterns and marketing claims).
    • Use of hand soaps that that meet one or more of the following standards: EPA safer choice, Green Seal GS-41, UL Ecologo 2784, or soaps with no antimicrobial agents (other than as a preservative) except where required by health codes and other regulations (e.g., food service and health care requirements).
    • In areas where soap and water are not available, use of hand sanitizers that contain at least 60% alcohol and meet one or more of the following standards: UL Ecologo 2783.
    • Use paper towels, wiping/drying products, mops, buckets and other tools that meet one or more of the following standards: EPA comprehensive procurement guidelines for janitor paper and plastic trash can liners, Green Seal GS-01 for tissue paper, paper towels and napkins, UL Ecologo 175 for toilet tissue and hand towels, janitorial paper products derived from rapidly renewable resources or made from tree-free fibers; FSC certification for fiber procurement, California integrated waste management requirements, for plastic trash can liners (California Code of Regulations Title 14, Chapter 4, Article 5, or SABRC 42290-42297 Recycled Content Plastic Trash Bag Program).
    • Use of cleaning equipment that has ergonomic design features to reduce worker injuries such as vibration, noise, and user fatigue. For examples of ergonomic design features, see EQ credit powered cleaning equipment.
    • If you are deploying other procedures that could be beneficial please share that with us at usgbc.org.
    Procedures on cleaning and disinfection
    • Use of procedures that meet the joint requirements of CDC and EPA on Reopening Guidance for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplaces, Businesses, Schools, and Homes.
    • Use of procedures that optimize cleaning personnel resources and minimize unnecessary use of valuable cleaning products and equipment. Do not overuse or stockpile disinfectants or other supplies. Where possible, adjust spaces to minimize frequently touched surfaces and regularly update cleaning personnel on occupant activities in the building to ensure their cleaning aligns with the way the building is being used.
    • Identification of “high-touch surfaces” along with frequencies for cleaning and disinfecting the different objects so designated.
    • Procedure for quantitative testing of the cleanliness of surfaces.
    • Strategies for promoting and improving hand hygiene, including prioritizing thorough washing of hands with plain soap and water over hand sanitizers where possible.
    • If you are deploying other procedures that could be beneficial please share that with us at usgbc.org.
    Protection for cleaning personnel
    • Use of proper personnel protective equipment (PPE) including eye protection, masks, gloves and gowns for all cleaning personnel as required by the products and processes being used, face coverings, as well as the requirements of the buildings and its occupants relative to COVID-19.
    • Use of tools, equipment and procedures that reduce ergonomic injuries to workers (e.g. injuries to the back, shoulders and knees).
    • If you are deploying other procedures that could be beneficial please share that with us at usgbc.org.
    Training of cleaning personnel
    • Use of disinfectants and other cleaning products and equipment.
    • Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) including how to properly put it on, take it off and disposal.
    • Training on the hazards of the cleaning chemicals used in the workplace in accordance with OSHA’s Hazard Communication standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) and comply with OSHA’s standards on Bloodborne Pathogens (29 CFR 1910.1030), including proper disposal of regulated waste, and PPE (29 CFR 1910.132).
    • Training on the basics of infection control and the science of cleaning; personal protective equipment (PPE); ergonomics protection for workers; hazards of disinfectant and other chemical products; disposal of cleaning chemicals; proper use and maintenance of chemical dispensing equipment; and proper training on other products and equipment used in the cleaning process.
    • Train cleaning personnel to be able to answer occupant’s basic questions about cleaning procedures.
    • If you are deploying other procedures that could be beneficial please share that with us at usgbc.org.
    Note: The following training programs meet the above requirements:
    • Thomas Shortman Training Fund: Cleaning for COVID-19 & other Infectious Diseases
    • Building Skills Partnership: Infectious Disease Certification Program
    • Building Service Contractors Association International (BSCAI): COVID-19 Disinfection & Safety Course
    Occupant Education
    • Provide occupant education to ensure understanding of the steps taken to disinfect and clean the space.

    The COVID-19 (Coronavirus) outbreak is an ongoing, developing situation with a rapidly changing legal and regulatory landscape; the information and guidance provided in the LEED Safety First Pilot Credits may at any time not be current and USGBC does not guarantee the accuracy of the information. In preparing this guidance and its conclusions and recommendations, USGBC has tried to incorporate the best available information at the time the guidance was prepared. The results of future studies may require revisions to the recommendations in this guidance.

    The recommendations included in the LEED Safety First Pilot Credits do not set a standard, nor should they be deemed either inclusive of all proper methods or exclusive of other methods for workplace reentry. The ultimate judgment regarding the utility of any specific approach and when it is safe to re-enter workspaces must be made by you in light of all circumstances and variables.

    USGBC encourages projects teams and owners to monitor publicly available information and to always follow federal, state and local health organization guidance and government mandates. Where appropriate, you should seek the advice of an appropriate licensed professional or relevant government office in your location for advice on current laws and regulations.

    Submittals

    General
    Register for the pilot credit Feedback Survey
    Documentation/Compliance
    • Description of the green cleaning approach implemented by the project team, including a timeline outlining when new practices were put in place for COVID-19, and copy of the green cleaning policy or program.
    • List of cleaning products and materials used or purchased to clean the building and associated compliant green cleaning criteria (also indicate when products are non-compliant).
    • Description of the training program for cleaning personnel. Include training details for the proper application of disinfectants and the use of personal protective equipment for cleaning personnel (If one of the above-mentioned training programs is used, these additional training details are not required).
    • Description of surface testing process with a sample of the test results.
    • Description of occupant education.
    Changes
    • 5/19/20 - Original Publication
    • 7/23/20:
      • Added clarification for use of test strips with concentrated disinfectants
      • Added missing option for janitor paper products (option is available in O+M v4.1 and was accidentally left out of pilot credit requirements)
      • Added note with available industry trainings for cleaning personnel
      See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Subscribe to new discussions about Pilot-Credits INpc137