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LEED Pilot Credits
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Energy-Related Pilot Credits
Residential Energy Submetering and Real-time Usage Data

LEED CREDIT

Pilot-Credits EApc118: Residential Energy Submetering and Real-time Usage Data 1 point

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USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

Note: At least 40% of the gross certifying project area needs to be residential building type to use this pilot credit.

To promote energy management and increase energy savings in single-family and multifamily homes by providing occupants with real-time usage data for major electrical appliances in the home.

Requirements

Install metering technology that provides residents with real-time electricity use data of major electrical appliances in the home.

Meet the following requirements:

  1. Enable the homeowner or tenant to access appliance and end use-specific electricity consumption data from computers or smartphones; deliver notifications to homeowners or tenants that show appliances that are inefficient; and deliver recommendations for better appliances or sustainable behavioral changes.
  2. Upon occupant move in, metering technology must recognize all major electrical appliances, if installed in the home or dwelling unit, including: refrigerator, clothes washer, clothes dryer, dishwasher, pool pump, air conditioner, space heater, water heater, electric stove burner, TV or entertainment center, and desktop computer.
  3. Multifamily projects:

  • Metering technology must recognize all major electrical appliances installed in each multifamily unit, with the technology recognizing a minimum of 3 end uses per unit.
  • Metering technology requirements apply only to electrical appliances installed within each multifamily unit.
  • For projects where commissioning is required, metering technology must be included in the owner or developer scope of work.
  • Upon occupant move in, provide homeowners or tenants with instructions for using installed technology, and educational materials that describe the operation, maintenance and value of the technology installed. Educational materials may be information sheets, or infographics, designed to teach homeowners about the energy and cost saving benefits of the technology installed and appropriate usage, in an easy-to-understand format with graphics and images.
  • The sub-meter installed must comply with local electricity wiring regulations.
  • Project teams could install the following technologies to provide real-time electricity use data of major electrical appliances in the home:

    • Smart meter-dependent disaggregation technology, connect home smart meter to a Home Area Network (HAN) through a WiFi-enabled gateway device
    • Panel meters installed for each major electrical appliances in the home. A qualified electrician must install panel meters prior to occupant move-in.

    Submittals

    General

    Register for the pilot credit

    Pilot Credit Survey

    Credit Specific
    • Signed statement from appropriate LEED project team member that: confirms appropriate installation of compliant technology in the home; describes the technology installed; and lists major electrical appliances in the home recognized by the product.
    • Example of the technology use instructions and educational materials to be distributed to homeowner.
    • Screenshot or picture of the submetering system interface installed in the home or multifamily unit. For multifamily projects, a picture of the system interface installed in one unit, as a representative sample of the system interface installed in all units included in the project scope of work, is sufficient.
    Questions
    • Did finding a smart gateway device system that provided users with appliance-specific energy consumption data pose any difficulties?
    • Did the project team leverage incentive programs or subsidies to help cover the cost of submeters?
    • Why did the project choose to pursue this pilot credit? Were there any companion programs pursued, such as an occupant engagement and/or behavioral change program?
    • What were some of the barriers to implementing the strategies used under this credit?
    • Did the homeowner influence the decision to install the technology?
    • Overall, did you notice or do you believe this technology helps to foster energy conservation behaviors?
    • Did you observe any barriers to energy conservation behaviors in homeowners or tenants? If so, what are they?
    • Was any of the data aggregated and shared for the purposes of giving homeowners and tenants a baseline against which to compare their own information?

    Published 5/1/2017

    See all forum discussions about this credit »

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    USGBC logo

    © Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

    Intent

    Note: At least 40% of the gross certifying project area needs to be residential building type to use this pilot credit.

    To promote energy management and increase energy savings in single-family and multifamily homes by providing occupants with real-time usage data for major electrical appliances in the home.

    Requirements

    Install metering technology that provides residents with real-time electricity use data of major electrical appliances in the home.

    Meet the following requirements:

    1. Enable the homeowner or tenant to access appliance and end use-specific electricity consumption data from computers or smartphones; deliver notifications to homeowners or tenants that show appliances that are inefficient; and deliver recommendations for better appliances or sustainable behavioral changes.
    2. Upon occupant move in, metering technology must recognize all major electrical appliances, if installed in the home or dwelling unit, including: refrigerator, clothes washer, clothes dryer, dishwasher, pool pump, air conditioner, space heater, water heater, electric stove burner, TV or entertainment center, and desktop computer.
    3. Multifamily projects:

    • Metering technology must recognize all major electrical appliances installed in each multifamily unit, with the technology recognizing a minimum of 3 end uses per unit.
    • Metering technology requirements apply only to electrical appliances installed within each multifamily unit.
    • For projects where commissioning is required, metering technology must be included in the owner or developer scope of work.
  • Upon occupant move in, provide homeowners or tenants with instructions for using installed technology, and educational materials that describe the operation, maintenance and value of the technology installed. Educational materials may be information sheets, or infographics, designed to teach homeowners about the energy and cost saving benefits of the technology installed and appropriate usage, in an easy-to-understand format with graphics and images.
  • The sub-meter installed must comply with local electricity wiring regulations.
  • Project teams could install the following technologies to provide real-time electricity use data of major electrical appliances in the home:

    • Smart meter-dependent disaggregation technology, connect home smart meter to a Home Area Network (HAN) through a WiFi-enabled gateway device
    • Panel meters installed for each major electrical appliances in the home. A qualified electrician must install panel meters prior to occupant move-in.

    Submittals

    General

    Register for the pilot credit

    Pilot Credit Survey

    Credit Specific
    • Signed statement from appropriate LEED project team member that: confirms appropriate installation of compliant technology in the home; describes the technology installed; and lists major electrical appliances in the home recognized by the product.
    • Example of the technology use instructions and educational materials to be distributed to homeowner.
    • Screenshot or picture of the submetering system interface installed in the home or multifamily unit. For multifamily projects, a picture of the system interface installed in one unit, as a representative sample of the system interface installed in all units included in the project scope of work, is sufficient.
    Questions
    • Did finding a smart gateway device system that provided users with appliance-specific energy consumption data pose any difficulties?
    • Did the project team leverage incentive programs or subsidies to help cover the cost of submeters?
    • Why did the project choose to pursue this pilot credit? Were there any companion programs pursued, such as an occupant engagement and/or behavioral change program?
    • What were some of the barriers to implementing the strategies used under this credit?
    • Did the homeowner influence the decision to install the technology?
    • Overall, did you notice or do you believe this technology helps to foster energy conservation behaviors?
    • Did you observe any barriers to energy conservation behaviors in homeowners or tenants? If so, what are they?
    • Was any of the data aggregated and shared for the purposes of giving homeowners and tenants a baseline against which to compare their own information?

    Published 5/1/2017

    See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Subscribe to new discussions about Pilot-Credits EApc118