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LEED v4
New Construction
Indoor Environmental Quality

Interior lighting

LEED CREDIT

NC-v4 EQc6: Interior lighting 1-2 points

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SPECIAL REPORT

LEEDuser expert

Kera Lagios

M.Arch, LEED AP BD+C, Assoc. IALD

Integral Group
Associate Principal

SPECIAL REPORT

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Credit language

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To promote occupants’ productivity, comfort, and well-being by providing high-quality lighting.

Requirements

Select one or both of the following two options.

Option 1. Lighting control (1 point)

For at least 90% of individual occupant spaces, provide individual lighting controls that enable occupants to adjust the lighting to suit their individual tasks and preferences, with at least three lighting levels or scenes (on, off, midlevel). Midlevel is 30% to 70% of the maximum illumination level (not including daylight contributions).

For all shared multioccupant spaces, meet all of the following requirements.

  • Have in place multizone control systems that enable occupants to adjust the lighting to meet group needs and preferences, with at least three lighting levels or scenes (on, off, midlevel).
  • Lighting for any presentation or projection wall must be separately controlled.
  • Switches or manual controls must be located in the same space as the controlled luminaires. A person operating the controls must have a direct line of sight to the controlled luminaires.

AND/OR

Option 2. Lighting quality (1 point)

Choose four of the following strategies.

  1. For all regularly occupied spaces, use light fixtures with a luminance of less than 2,500 cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir.
    Exceptions include wallwash fixtures properly aimed at walls, as specified by manufacturer’s data, indirect uplighting fixtures, provided there is no view down into these uplights from a regularly occupied space above, and any other specific applications (i.e. adjustable fixtures).
  2. For the entire project, use light sources with a CRI of 80 or higher. Exceptions include lamps or fixtures specifically designed to provide colored lighting for effect, site lighting, or other special use.
  3. For 75% of the total connected lighting load, use light sources that have a rated life (or L70 for LED sources) of at least 24,000 hours (at 3-hour per start, if applicable).
  4. Use direct-only overhead lighting for 25% or less of the total connected lighting load for all regularly occupied spaces.
  5. For 90% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 85% for ceilings, 60% for walls, and 25% for floors.
  6. If furniture is included in the scope of work, select furniture finishes to meet the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 45% for work surfaces, and 50% for movable partitions.
  7. For 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet ratio of average wall surface illuminance (excluding fenestration) to average work plane (or surface, if defined) illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet strategy E, strategy F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of 60% for walls.
  8. For 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet ratio of average ceiling illuminance (excluding fenestration) to work surface illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet strategy E, strategy F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of 85% for ceilings.

Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

India ACP: Interior Lighting

I. Projects in India may, in all regularly occupied spaces, meet or exceed the lower illuminance levels listed in the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) code -- IS 3646 (Part 1): 1992, Table 1- Recommended Illumination.

See all forum discussions about this credit »

What does it cost?

Cost estimates for this credit

On each BD+C v4 credit, LEEDuser offers the wisdom of a team of architects, engineers, cost estimators, and LEED experts with hundreds of LEED projects between then. They analyzed the sustainable design strategies associated with each LEED credit, but also to assign actual costs to those strategies.

Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

This information is also available in a full PDF download in The Cost of LEED v4 report.

Learn more about The Cost of LEED v4 »

Frequently asked questions

For Option 1, we would like occupants to be able to control lighting in their area from smartphones, tablets, or computers; we plan to eliminate physical switches altogether. Would this meet the intent of Option 1?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

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Do operable shades count as lighting controls?

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Does having multi-circuit lighting count as providing multiple lighting levels?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

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How do I calculate an illuminance ratio?

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Is Option 1 achievable for open office spaces?

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What lighting controls are required for a conference room with a presentation screen?

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Can I use recessed fixtures and still meet Strategy D?

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Where do I find the CRI of a lamp?

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Do task lights need to meet all the lighting quality requirements?

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How limiting are the reflectance values in the finish requirements?

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Daylight is an important strategy in my project. How do I meet this credit as well as the daylighting credit?

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See all forum discussions about this credit »

Documentation toolkit

The motherlode of cheat sheets

LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit is loaded with calculators to help assess credit compliance, tracking spreadsheets for materials, sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions, and examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects for you to check your work against. To get your plaque, start with the right toolkit.

LEEDuser expert

Kera Lagios

M.Arch, LEED AP BD+C, Assoc. IALD

Integral Group
Associate Principal

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USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To promote occupants’ productivity, comfort, and well-being by providing high-quality lighting.

Requirements

Select one or both of the following two options.

Option 1. Lighting control (1 point)

For at least 90% of individual occupant spaces, provide individual lighting controls that enable occupants to adjust the lighting to suit their individual tasks and preferences, with at least three lighting levels or scenes (on, off, midlevel). Midlevel is 30% to 70% of the maximum illumination level (not including daylight contributions).

For all shared multioccupant spaces, meet all of the following requirements.

  • Have in place multizone control systems that enable occupants to adjust the lighting to meet group needs and preferences, with at least three lighting levels or scenes (on, off, midlevel).
  • Lighting for any presentation or projection wall must be separately controlled.
  • Switches or manual controls must be located in the same space as the controlled luminaires. A person operating the controls must have a direct line of sight to the controlled luminaires.

AND/OR

Option 2. Lighting quality (1 point)

Choose four of the following strategies.

  1. For all regularly occupied spaces, use light fixtures with a luminance of less than 2,500 cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir.
    Exceptions include wallwash fixtures properly aimed at walls, as specified by manufacturer’s data, indirect uplighting fixtures, provided there is no view down into these uplights from a regularly occupied space above, and any other specific applications (i.e. adjustable fixtures).
  2. For the entire project, use light sources with a CRI of 80 or higher. Exceptions include lamps or fixtures specifically designed to provide colored lighting for effect, site lighting, or other special use.
  3. For 75% of the total connected lighting load, use light sources that have a rated life (or L70 for LED sources) of at least 24,000 hours (at 3-hour per start, if applicable).
  4. Use direct-only overhead lighting for 25% or less of the total connected lighting load for all regularly occupied spaces.
  5. For 90% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 85% for ceilings, 60% for walls, and 25% for floors.
  6. If furniture is included in the scope of work, select furniture finishes to meet the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 45% for work surfaces, and 50% for movable partitions.
  7. For 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet ratio of average wall surface illuminance (excluding fenestration) to average work plane (or surface, if defined) illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet strategy E, strategy F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of 60% for walls.
  8. For 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet ratio of average ceiling illuminance (excluding fenestration) to work surface illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet strategy E, strategy F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of 85% for ceilings.

Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

India ACP: Interior Lighting

I. Projects in India may, in all regularly occupied spaces, meet or exceed the lower illuminance levels listed in the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) code -- IS 3646 (Part 1): 1992, Table 1- Recommended Illumination.

Cost estimates for this credit

On each BD+C v4 credit, LEEDuser offers the wisdom of a team of architects, engineers, cost estimators, and LEED experts with hundreds of LEED projects between then. They analyzed the sustainable design strategies associated with each LEED credit, but also to assign actual costs to those strategies.

Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

This information is also available in a full PDF download in The Cost of LEED v4 report.

Learn more about The Cost of LEED v4 »

In the end, LEED is all about documentation. LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit, for premium members only, saves you time and helps you avoid mistakes with:

  • Calculators to help assess credit compliance.
  • Tracking spreadsheets for materials purchases.
  • Spreadsheets and forms to give to subs and other team members.
  • Guidance documents on arcane LEED issues.
  • Sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions.
  • Examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects.

For Option 1, we would like occupants to be able to control lighting in their area from smartphones, tablets, or computers; we plan to eliminate physical switches altogether. Would this meet the intent of Option 1?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Do operable shades count as lighting controls?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Does having multi-circuit lighting count as providing multiple lighting levels?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

How do I calculate an illuminance ratio?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Is Option 1 achievable for open office spaces?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

What lighting controls are required for a conference room with a presentation screen?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Can I use recessed fixtures and still meet Strategy D?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Where do I find the CRI of a lamp?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Do task lights need to meet all the lighting quality requirements?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

How limiting are the reflectance values in the finish requirements?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Daylight is an important strategy in my project. How do I meet this credit as well as the daylighting credit?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

LEEDuser expert

Kera Lagios

M.Arch, LEED AP BD+C, Assoc. IALD

Integral Group
Associate Principal

See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Subscribe to new discussions about NC-v4 EQc6