Log in
LEED v2009
New Construction
Indoor Environmental Quality

Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control

LEED CREDIT

NC-2009 IEQp2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Required

See all forum discussions about this credit »

Credit achievement rate

XX%

Upgrade to LEEDuser Premium to see how many projects achieved this credit. Try it free »

LEEDuser expert

Virginia Leary

LEED AP BD+C; TRUE Advisor, Fitwel Advisor

WSP USA
Assistant Consultant

LEEDuser’s viewpoint

Frank advice from LEED experts

LEED is changing all the time, and every project is unique. Even seasoned professionals can miss a critical detail and lose a credit or even a prerequisite at the last minute. Our expert advice guides our LEEDuser Premium members and saves you valuable time.

Credit language

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

Option 1
Prohibit smoking in the building.Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet (8 meters) of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows.Provide signage to allow smoking in designated areas, prohibit smoking in designated areas or prohibit smoking on the entire property.

OR

Option 2
CASE 1. Non-residential projects
Prohibit smoking in the building except in designated smoking areas. Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet (8 meters) of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows. Provide signage to allow smoking in designated areas, prohibit smoking in designated areas or prohibit smoking on the entire property. Provide designated smoking rooms designed to contain, capture and remove ETS from the building. At a minimum, the smoking room must be directly exhausted to the outdoors, away from air intakes and building entry paths, with no recirculation of ETS-containing air to nonsmoking areas and enclosed with impermeable deck-to-deck partitions. The smoking room must be operated at a negative pressure, compared with the surrounding spaces, of at least an average of 5 Pascals (Pa) (0.02 inches of water gauge) and a minimum of 1 Pa (0.004 inches of water gauge) when the doors to the smoking rooms are closed.Verify performance of the smoking rooms’ differential air pressures by conducting 15 minutes of measurement, with a minimum of 1 measurement every 10 seconds, of the differential pressure in the smoking room with respect to each adjacent area and in each adjacent vertical chase with the doors to the smoking room closed. Conduct the testing with each space configured for worst-case conditions of transport of air from the smoking rooms (with closed doors) to adjacent spaces.
CASE 2. Residential and hospitality projects
Prohibit smoking in all common areas of the building.Locate any exterior designated smoking areas, including balconies where smoking is permitted, at least 25 feet (8 meters) from entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows opening to common areas. Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet (8 meters) of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows. Provide signage to allow smoking in designated areas, prohibit smoking in designated areas or prohibit smoking on the entire property. Weather-strip all exterior doors and operable windows in the residential units to minimize leakage from outdoors.Minimize uncontrolled pathways for ETS transfer between individual residential units by sealing penetrations in walls, ceilings, and floors in the residential units and by sealing vertical chases adjacent to the units.Weather-strip all doors in the residential units leading to common hallways to minimize air leakage into the hallway1.Demonstrate acceptable sealing of residential units by a blower door test conducted in accordance with ANSI/ASTM-E779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage Rate by Fan Pressurization. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ANSI/ASTM-E779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage Rate By Fan Pressurization. [Europe ACP: Blower Door]Use the progressive sampling methodology defined in Chapter 4 (Compliance Through Quality Construction) of the Residential Manual for Compliance with California’s 2001 Energy Efficiency Standards. Residential units must demonstrate less than 1.25 square inches leakage area per 100 square feet (8 square centimeters of leakage area per 10 square meters) of enclosure area (i.e., sum of all wall, ceiling and floor areas).
1 If the common hallways are pressurized with respect to the residential units then doors in the residential units leading to the common hallways need not be weather-stripped provided that the positive differential pressure is demonstrated as in Option 2, Case 1 above, considering the residential unit as the smoking room.

Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

Europe ACP: ANSI/ASTM-E779-03
Projects in Europe may use CEN Standard EN 13829:2002 Thermal Performance of buildings – Determination of air permeability of buildings – Fan pressurization method.[view:embed_resource=page_1=4887966] See all forum discussions about this credit »

What does it cost?

Cost estimates for this credit

On each BD+C v4 credit, LEEDuser offers the wisdom of a team of architects, engineers, cost estimators, and LEED experts with hundreds of LEED projects between then. They analyzed the sustainable design strategies associated with each LEED credit, but also to assign actual costs to those strategies.

Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

This information is also available in a full PDF download in The Cost of LEED v4 report.

Learn more about The Cost of LEED v4 »

Frequently asked questions

Do I have to provide a designated smoking area?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

How can I prohibit smoking 25 feet from the entrance of my project when it is a zero lot line and its entrance abuts a public sidewalk?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

How do you calculate the 25 ft. rule from designated smoking areas to building openings?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

We have a strict no-smoking policy and local smoking laws that all our employees are familiar with. Can we skip the signage?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Does this prerequisite apply to e-cigarettes? What about marijuana?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

See all forum discussions about this credit »

Addenda

4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the second line of the text, replace "Case 1, Option 2" with "Option 2, Case 1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Delete the Alternative Compliance Path for Projects Outside the U.S.
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Remove the heading "CASE 1. All Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Remove the heading "CASE 1. All Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Below the "OPTION 2" heading, insert the heading "CASE 1. Non-Residential Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Below the "OPTION 2" heading, insert the heading "CASE 1. Non-Residential Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the third line of the last paragraph, remove the hyperlink "(http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/residential_manual)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Below the title of the second standard provided, insert the hyperlink http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/residential_manual
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
In the 7th paragraph, add the following after the first sentence: "Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ANSI/ASTM-E779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage Rate By Fan Pressurization."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the third line of the last paragraph, remove the hyperlink "(http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/residential_manual)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the footnote that references Figure 2 on page 420 of IEQp2, at the end the text add "This information is subject to change based on the ongoing indoorsmoking legislation of each state."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the "CASE 2" heading, remove the word "Only" so the text becomes "CASE 2. Residential and Hospitality Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the "CASE 2" heading, remove the word "Only" so the text becomes "CASE 2. Residential and Hospitality Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the second line of the text, replace "Case 1, Option 2" with "Option 2, Case 1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Insert the term "Lodging" in alphabetical order with the accompanying text "Lodging are facilities that provide overnight accommodations to customers or guests, including hotels, motels, inns and resorts."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project consists of a new hotel in its entirety. It is a stand-alone building with its own separate entrance, restrooms, lobby, and amenities. The owner is considering connecting the hotel to an existing casino, where smoking is allowed. The Supplemental Guidance to the LEED MPR specifically mentions casinos and EQp2, and indicates there will be no exceptions to this MPR to allow for partial building certification. We do not believe this applies to us since we are building a new stand-alone hotel in its entirety, not a partial building. EQp2 indicates that if there is a smoking room within a LEED building, it shall be operated under an average negative pressure of 5 Pa, etc. We are seeking clarification on whether or not it is acceptable to connect our new hotel to an existing building with smoking, and if yes, what rules need to be followed regarding the connection. If a connection to a smoking building is allowed, we would prohibit smoking in the existing building within 25 feet of the new hotel building entrance. If a connection to a smoking building is allowed, can it have an open area, in which we maintain a high air velocity to eliminate smoke migration between the two buildings? Or does it require doors between the two buildings and maintenance of 5 Pa of pressure similar to a smoking room?

Ruling:

The applicant would like to confirm if a new hotel building pursuing LEED Certification can be connected to an existing casino that allows smoking. The project is a stand-alone hotel with its own separate entrance. The hotel project does not fall under the "no exceptions" for projects with IEQp2 conflicts found in the LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance as it is not an attempt to certify only a portion of the building, nor is it attempting to exclude a portion of the building from the LEED project boundary.It is acceptable to provide a connection between the new hotel building and the existing casino building, provided the applicable criteria for certifying Attached Buildings separately, from pages 14-17 of the LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance, revision 2, dated September 2011, are met. In addition, measures must be taken to ensure that Environmental Tobacco Smoke from the existing casino building does not enter the new hotel building. There must be self-closing doors and impermeable deck-to-deck partitions separating the hotel building from the casino. Furthermore, there must be an exhaust system sufficient to create a negative pressure differential between the hotel building and the casino building (or connecting corridor) of at least an average of 5 Pascals (Pa) and a minimum of 1 Pa when the doors between the hotel building and the casino are closed. Performance of the required air pressure differentials must be verified by conducting 15 minutes of measurement with a minimum of one measurement every 10 seconds. Note that we are essentially requiring isolation of the connected casino space with mechanical exhaust as if it were a designated smoking room with respect to the LEED-certifying building. Please refer to Option 2, Case 1, of IEQp2 for additional details on how to properly isolate, and verify the performance of, a designated smoking room. Smoking must also be prohibited within the existing casino building within 25ft of the connection to the LEED building. All other requirements of IEQp2 must also be met for the new hotel building pursuing LEED Certification. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
12/19/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project is submitting under LEED-CI V2.0 for a tenant space renovation. The building that the tenant occupies is smoke free, except for a bar & restaurant. There was a recent city ordinance passed to ban smoking at all bars & restaurants by July 2008. The building management has also required this tenant to ban smoking by this date per city ordinance, making the building completely smoke free. Would a letter indicating future compliance by the tenant, along with documentation of the city ordinance fulfill the requirements of this prerequisite? Also, if the entrance to this building is on public property, and the current ordinance prohibits smoking only 15\' away from entrances, instead of 25\' as required per LEED, will the project still comply with the intent of the credit?

Ruling:

The CIR is inquiring whether proof of future compliance would be acceptable to meet the prerequisite and whether prohibiting smoking within 15 feet from entrances would meet the intent of the credit. Future compliance for this prerequisite would not meet the intent, which is to prevent or minimize exposure of tenant space occupants, indoor surfaces, and systems to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS). If smoking in a space is allowed for an extended period of time, this extends the timeframe over which occupants, systems, and surfaces within these spaces will be exposed to ETS. Materials which absorb ETS will off-gas after the smoking itself ceases, further extending the exposure timeframe. Limiting smoking to 15 feet from entrances instead of 25 feet would not meet the credit requirement. The project should prohibit smoking within 25 feet from building entrances, to the extent possible, in order to meet the credit requirements. If the applicant does not have the authority to prohibit smoking within 25 feet of the entrance, signage should be posted requesting that people do not smoke within 25 feet of the entrance. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
8/14/2003
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The City of Charlottesville is currently in the process of planning a multi-use transit center for which we are pursuing a Silver LEED accreditation. The multi-use facility in design will include the shell for installation of a restaurant on the upper floor of the building. Locating a restaurant at this site is ideal in marketing terms due to the popularity of the surrounding areas and the high quality of restaurants already in the area. The restaurant space will, of course, be required to comply with all credits pursued by our organization, as described in our application. With a grand total of 23, 295 sq ft of enclosed space in the multi-use facility, 15,795 sq ft of that will be designated non-smoking and the remaining portion, confined to the restaurant\'s enclosed space will be isolated through the use of negative pressure ventilation and an isolated HVAC system that effectively eliminates any contamination of restaurant air with air circulated through the rest of the facility. The fidelity of the isolation measures will be tested in compliance with methods described in ASHRAE Standard 129-1997 (Smoking Room Testing). Will the ratio of 15,795 sq ft enclosed non-smoking space : 23,295 sq ft total enclosed space be sufficient to qualify for the ETS pre-requisite? In other words, will a smoking room that comprises a fair percentage of the building\'s total floor space be within the letter of the pre-requisite given full compliance with isolated ventilation requirements?

Ruling:

The prerequisite requires, "Zero exposure of nonsmokers to ETS by prohibition of smoking in the building, OR, provide a designated smoking room designed to effectively contain, capture and remove ETS from the building". The CIR narrative implies that the entire restaurant is being treated as a smoking room. While this approach will prevent building occupants in other spaces within the building from tobacco smoke exposure, it does not protect non-smoking restaurant patrons from smoke within the space. If smoking cannot be prohibited in the restaurant, the project team and owner may wish to consider creating a fully contained smoking section within the facility that meets the requirements set forth under the prerequisite. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/2/2018
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Inquiry:
Is the smoking of cannabis covered under the Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control prerequisite?

Ruling:

Yes, smoking of cannabis is considered a form of smoking for the purposes of both the interior and exterior smoking provisions of the LEED Prerequisite Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control.

Secondhand cannabis smoke has been shown to contain many of the same chemicals and carcinogens as secondhand tobacco smoke [1].

[1] Moir D, Rickert WS, Levasseur G, et al. A Comparison of Mainstream and Sidestream Marijuana and Tobacco Cigarette Smoke Produced under Two Machine Smoking Conditions. American Chemical Society. 2008;21:494-502.

Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/14/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

How are balconies to be addressed within the multi-unit residential compliance path presented by the 12/3/03 NCv2.1 CIR and NCv2.2 Option 3? And how are balconies treated within the option for prohibiting smoking? The credit requirements are not clear in this regard.

Ruling:

Any potential smoking outdoors must be addressed in regards to secondhand smoke exposure. Balconies are automatically considered smoking areas unless smoking on them is prohibited (by the building manager in the case of a leased apartment; by the initial HOA Rules and Regulations in the case of a condominium). For any compliance path, if a balcony does not comply with the requirements for exterior smoking areas (at least 25 feet away from entries, operable windows and outdoor air intakes), smoking must be prohibited on the balcony. LEED projects registered before September 4, 2006, will not be held to this interpretation, but are encouraged to do so. This ruling reflects the original intent of the IEQ Technical Advisory Group and is considered consistent with the non-residential compliance paths and with the mission of green building. The ruling is also considered reasonable because eighty percent of the U.S. population does not smoke.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
8/4/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project team plans to meet the intent of Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control through the use of "Smoking Cabins" and requests an exception to the technical requirements indicated to meet the intent. The smoking cabin is in full compliance with the requirements for ETS Control Systems GS-BGIA-M14 of BGIA (German Institute for Occupational safety and health), soon to be ground for the CEN European standard for Non-smoker protection. It has already been integrated in the law for non smoker protection of some European countries, like Austria. The BGIA tests control how a given cabin limits and eliminates tobacco related particles and gases. The smoking cabin is a small free-standing kind of smoking room, open or closed, where a high air flow ensures immediate capture of all tobacco smoke before it is dispersed in the cabin (contrary to a smoking room where all smoke spreads in the room before being ventilated). Immediate capture (vs ventilation) is a standard technology used in many other industries. The smoke is then purified through a combination of high standards particle filters and active coal gas filters, leaving no traces of tobacco specific particles or gases (cf GS-BGIA-M14). Cabins can be open or closed. The result is the disappearance of all tobacco specific particles and gases under detection level. The following guarantees to reach the intent of ETS Control, even though the technical approach is different: 1. Efficient capture of the smoke is guaranteed by very high air flow, (minimum of 200m3/h per smokers, and 3x times the volume of the cabin per minute), to ensure immediate capture of the smoke before it totally mixes with the air in the cabin. The capture efficiency and the no contamination of adjacent area is tested and proven by BGIA GS-BGIA-M14. 2. Recycling, elimination of particles: particles are removed through the use of absolute filters level HEPA14 -ULPA 15, purifying up to 99,9995% of the MPPS (Most Penetrating Particles - 0,1

Ruling:

The project is requesting an alternative compliance pathway for EQp2: ETS Control, by using indoor smoking cabins with in situ filtration. While air cleaning and dilution ventilation have been found to be helpful in improving visibility and reducing irritation in rooms with tobacco smoking, neither air cleaning nor dilution ventilation have been shown to provide acceptable indoor air quality from a health perspective (e.g. lung cancer, cardiovascular disease etc.). For these reasons, this approach does not meet the intent of the prerequisite and will not be accepted. Applicable Internationally; Germany.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/1/2014
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Are electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) covered under the Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control prerequisite?

Ruling:

Yes, electronic cigarettes are considered a form of smoking for the purposes of both the interior and exterior smoking provisions of the LEED Prerequisite Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control. As recommended in the December 2013 report[1] prepared for the World Health Organization, “e-cigarettes should be prohibited anywhere where the use of conventional cigarettes is prohibited”. The indoor air quality impacts from electronic cigarettes are not fully characterized, but there is sufficient evidence that electronic cigarettes produce emissions in fine aerosol form that can expose building occupants. For example, according to the report, “several chemicals that have been found in e-cigarette aerosol and e-liquid are on California’s official list of known human carcinogens or reproductive toxicants, including nicotine, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, nickel, lead, toluene(1)”.

[1] Background Paper on E-cigarettes (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems); Grana, R.; Benowitz, N.; Glantz, SA; December 2013; University of California

Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
See all forum discussions about this credit »

Checklists

Step by step to LEED certification

LEEDuser’s checklists walk you through the key action steps you need to earn a credit, including how to avoid common pitfalls and save money.

See all forum discussions about this credit »

Documentation toolkit

The motherlode of cheat sheets

LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit is loaded with calculators to help assess credit compliance, tracking spreadsheets for materials, sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions, and examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects for you to check your work against. To get your plaque, start with the right toolkit.

Credit achievement rate

XX%

Upgrade to LEEDuser Premium to see how many projects achieved this credit. Try it free »

LEEDuser expert

Virginia Leary

LEED AP BD+C; TRUE Advisor, Fitwel Advisor

WSP USA
Assistant Consultant

Get the inside scoop

Our editors have written a detailed analysis of nearly every LEED credit, and LEEDuser premium members get full access. We’ll tell you whether the credit is easy to accomplish or better left alone, and we provide insider tips on how to document it successfully.

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

Option 1
Prohibit smoking in the building.Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet (8 meters) of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows.Provide signage to allow smoking in designated areas, prohibit smoking in designated areas or prohibit smoking on the entire property.

OR

Option 2
CASE 1. Non-residential projects
Prohibit smoking in the building except in designated smoking areas. Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet (8 meters) of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows. Provide signage to allow smoking in designated areas, prohibit smoking in designated areas or prohibit smoking on the entire property. Provide designated smoking rooms designed to contain, capture and remove ETS from the building. At a minimum, the smoking room must be directly exhausted to the outdoors, away from air intakes and building entry paths, with no recirculation of ETS-containing air to nonsmoking areas and enclosed with impermeable deck-to-deck partitions. The smoking room must be operated at a negative pressure, compared with the surrounding spaces, of at least an average of 5 Pascals (Pa) (0.02 inches of water gauge) and a minimum of 1 Pa (0.004 inches of water gauge) when the doors to the smoking rooms are closed.Verify performance of the smoking rooms’ differential air pressures by conducting 15 minutes of measurement, with a minimum of 1 measurement every 10 seconds, of the differential pressure in the smoking room with respect to each adjacent area and in each adjacent vertical chase with the doors to the smoking room closed. Conduct the testing with each space configured for worst-case conditions of transport of air from the smoking rooms (with closed doors) to adjacent spaces.
CASE 2. Residential and hospitality projects
Prohibit smoking in all common areas of the building.Locate any exterior designated smoking areas, including balconies where smoking is permitted, at least 25 feet (8 meters) from entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows opening to common areas. Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet (8 meters) of entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows. Provide signage to allow smoking in designated areas, prohibit smoking in designated areas or prohibit smoking on the entire property. Weather-strip all exterior doors and operable windows in the residential units to minimize leakage from outdoors.Minimize uncontrolled pathways for ETS transfer between individual residential units by sealing penetrations in walls, ceilings, and floors in the residential units and by sealing vertical chases adjacent to the units.Weather-strip all doors in the residential units leading to common hallways to minimize air leakage into the hallway1.Demonstrate acceptable sealing of residential units by a blower door test conducted in accordance with ANSI/ASTM-E779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage Rate by Fan Pressurization. Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ANSI/ASTM-E779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage Rate By Fan Pressurization. [Europe ACP: Blower Door]Use the progressive sampling methodology defined in Chapter 4 (Compliance Through Quality Construction) of the Residential Manual for Compliance with California’s 2001 Energy Efficiency Standards. Residential units must demonstrate less than 1.25 square inches leakage area per 100 square feet (8 square centimeters of leakage area per 10 square meters) of enclosure area (i.e., sum of all wall, ceiling and floor areas).
1 If the common hallways are pressurized with respect to the residential units then doors in the residential units leading to the common hallways need not be weather-stripped provided that the positive differential pressure is demonstrated as in Option 2, Case 1 above, considering the residential unit as the smoking room.

Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

Europe ACP: ANSI/ASTM-E779-03
Projects in Europe may use CEN Standard EN 13829:2002 Thermal Performance of buildings – Determination of air permeability of buildings – Fan pressurization method.[view:embed_resource=page_1=4887966]

XX%

Upgrade to LEEDuser Premium to see how many projects achieved this credit. Try it free »

Got the gist of IEQp2 but not sure how to actually achieve it? LEEDuser gives step-by-step help. Premium members get:

  • Checklists covering all the key action steps you'll need to earn the credit.
  • Hot tips to give you shortcuts and avoid pitfalls.
  • Cost tips to assess what a credit will actually cost, and how to make it affordable.
  • Ideas for going beyond LEED with best practices.
  • All checklists organized by project phase.
  • On-the-fly suggestions of useful items from the Documentation Toolkit and Credit Language.

In the end, LEED is all about documentation. LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit, for premium members only, saves you time and helps you avoid mistakes with:

  • Calculators to help assess credit compliance.
  • Tracking spreadsheets for materials purchases.
  • Spreadsheets and forms to give to subs and other team members.
  • Guidance documents on arcane LEED issues.
  • Sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions.
  • Examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects.

Do I have to provide a designated smoking area?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

How can I prohibit smoking 25 feet from the entrance of my project when it is a zero lot line and its entrance abuts a public sidewalk?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

How do you calculate the 25 ft. rule from designated smoking areas to building openings?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

We have a strict no-smoking policy and local smoking laws that all our employees are familiar with. Can we skip the signage?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Does this prerequisite apply to e-cigarettes? What about marijuana?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the second line of the text, replace "Case 1, Option 2" with "Option 2, Case 1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Delete the Alternative Compliance Path for Projects Outside the U.S.
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Remove the heading "CASE 1. All Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Remove the heading "CASE 1. All Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Below the "OPTION 2" heading, insert the heading "CASE 1. Non-Residential Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Below the "OPTION 2" heading, insert the heading "CASE 1. Non-Residential Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the third line of the last paragraph, remove the hyperlink "(http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/residential_manual)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Below the title of the second standard provided, insert the hyperlink http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/residential_manual
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
In the 7th paragraph, add the following after the first sentence: "Projects outside the U.S. may use a local equivalent to ANSI/ASTM-E779-03, Standard Test Method for Determining Air Leakage Rate By Fan Pressurization."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the third line of the last paragraph, remove the hyperlink "(http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/residential_manual)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the footnote that references Figure 2 on page 420 of IEQp2, at the end the text add "This information is subject to change based on the ongoing indoorsmoking legislation of each state."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the "CASE 2" heading, remove the word "Only" so the text becomes "CASE 2. Residential and Hospitality Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the "CASE 2" heading, remove the word "Only" so the text becomes "CASE 2. Residential and Hospitality Projects"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the second line of the text, replace "Case 1, Option 2" with "Option 2, Case 1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Insert the term "Lodging" in alphabetical order with the accompanying text "Lodging are facilities that provide overnight accommodations to customers or guests, including hotels, motels, inns and resorts."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project consists of a new hotel in its entirety. It is a stand-alone building with its own separate entrance, restrooms, lobby, and amenities. The owner is considering connecting the hotel to an existing casino, where smoking is allowed. The Supplemental Guidance to the LEED MPR specifically mentions casinos and EQp2, and indicates there will be no exceptions to this MPR to allow for partial building certification. We do not believe this applies to us since we are building a new stand-alone hotel in its entirety, not a partial building. EQp2 indicates that if there is a smoking room within a LEED building, it shall be operated under an average negative pressure of 5 Pa, etc. We are seeking clarification on whether or not it is acceptable to connect our new hotel to an existing building with smoking, and if yes, what rules need to be followed regarding the connection. If a connection to a smoking building is allowed, we would prohibit smoking in the existing building within 25 feet of the new hotel building entrance. If a connection to a smoking building is allowed, can it have an open area, in which we maintain a high air velocity to eliminate smoke migration between the two buildings? Or does it require doors between the two buildings and maintenance of 5 Pa of pressure similar to a smoking room?

Ruling:

The applicant would like to confirm if a new hotel building pursuing LEED Certification can be connected to an existing casino that allows smoking. The project is a stand-alone hotel with its own separate entrance. The hotel project does not fall under the "no exceptions" for projects with IEQp2 conflicts found in the LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance as it is not an attempt to certify only a portion of the building, nor is it attempting to exclude a portion of the building from the LEED project boundary.It is acceptable to provide a connection between the new hotel building and the existing casino building, provided the applicable criteria for certifying Attached Buildings separately, from pages 14-17 of the LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance, revision 2, dated September 2011, are met. In addition, measures must be taken to ensure that Environmental Tobacco Smoke from the existing casino building does not enter the new hotel building. There must be self-closing doors and impermeable deck-to-deck partitions separating the hotel building from the casino. Furthermore, there must be an exhaust system sufficient to create a negative pressure differential between the hotel building and the casino building (or connecting corridor) of at least an average of 5 Pascals (Pa) and a minimum of 1 Pa when the doors between the hotel building and the casino are closed. Performance of the required air pressure differentials must be verified by conducting 15 minutes of measurement with a minimum of one measurement every 10 seconds. Note that we are essentially requiring isolation of the connected casino space with mechanical exhaust as if it were a designated smoking room with respect to the LEED-certifying building. Please refer to Option 2, Case 1, of IEQp2 for additional details on how to properly isolate, and verify the performance of, a designated smoking room. Smoking must also be prohibited within the existing casino building within 25ft of the connection to the LEED building. All other requirements of IEQp2 must also be met for the new hotel building pursuing LEED Certification. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
12/19/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project is submitting under LEED-CI V2.0 for a tenant space renovation. The building that the tenant occupies is smoke free, except for a bar & restaurant. There was a recent city ordinance passed to ban smoking at all bars & restaurants by July 2008. The building management has also required this tenant to ban smoking by this date per city ordinance, making the building completely smoke free. Would a letter indicating future compliance by the tenant, along with documentation of the city ordinance fulfill the requirements of this prerequisite? Also, if the entrance to this building is on public property, and the current ordinance prohibits smoking only 15\' away from entrances, instead of 25\' as required per LEED, will the project still comply with the intent of the credit?

Ruling:

The CIR is inquiring whether proof of future compliance would be acceptable to meet the prerequisite and whether prohibiting smoking within 15 feet from entrances would meet the intent of the credit. Future compliance for this prerequisite would not meet the intent, which is to prevent or minimize exposure of tenant space occupants, indoor surfaces, and systems to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS). If smoking in a space is allowed for an extended period of time, this extends the timeframe over which occupants, systems, and surfaces within these spaces will be exposed to ETS. Materials which absorb ETS will off-gas after the smoking itself ceases, further extending the exposure timeframe. Limiting smoking to 15 feet from entrances instead of 25 feet would not meet the credit requirement. The project should prohibit smoking within 25 feet from building entrances, to the extent possible, in order to meet the credit requirements. If the applicant does not have the authority to prohibit smoking within 25 feet of the entrance, signage should be posted requesting that people do not smoke within 25 feet of the entrance. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
8/14/2003
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The City of Charlottesville is currently in the process of planning a multi-use transit center for which we are pursuing a Silver LEED accreditation. The multi-use facility in design will include the shell for installation of a restaurant on the upper floor of the building. Locating a restaurant at this site is ideal in marketing terms due to the popularity of the surrounding areas and the high quality of restaurants already in the area. The restaurant space will, of course, be required to comply with all credits pursued by our organization, as described in our application. With a grand total of 23, 295 sq ft of enclosed space in the multi-use facility, 15,795 sq ft of that will be designated non-smoking and the remaining portion, confined to the restaurant\'s enclosed space will be isolated through the use of negative pressure ventilation and an isolated HVAC system that effectively eliminates any contamination of restaurant air with air circulated through the rest of the facility. The fidelity of the isolation measures will be tested in compliance with methods described in ASHRAE Standard 129-1997 (Smoking Room Testing). Will the ratio of 15,795 sq ft enclosed non-smoking space : 23,295 sq ft total enclosed space be sufficient to qualify for the ETS pre-requisite? In other words, will a smoking room that comprises a fair percentage of the building\'s total floor space be within the letter of the pre-requisite given full compliance with isolated ventilation requirements?

Ruling:

The prerequisite requires, "Zero exposure of nonsmokers to ETS by prohibition of smoking in the building, OR, provide a designated smoking room designed to effectively contain, capture and remove ETS from the building". The CIR narrative implies that the entire restaurant is being treated as a smoking room. While this approach will prevent building occupants in other spaces within the building from tobacco smoke exposure, it does not protect non-smoking restaurant patrons from smoke within the space. If smoking cannot be prohibited in the restaurant, the project team and owner may wish to consider creating a fully contained smoking section within the facility that meets the requirements set forth under the prerequisite. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/2/2018
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Inquiry:
Is the smoking of cannabis covered under the Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control prerequisite?

Ruling:

Yes, smoking of cannabis is considered a form of smoking for the purposes of both the interior and exterior smoking provisions of the LEED Prerequisite Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control.

Secondhand cannabis smoke has been shown to contain many of the same chemicals and carcinogens as secondhand tobacco smoke [1].

[1] Moir D, Rickert WS, Levasseur G, et al. A Comparison of Mainstream and Sidestream Marijuana and Tobacco Cigarette Smoke Produced under Two Machine Smoking Conditions. American Chemical Society. 2008;21:494-502.

Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/14/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

How are balconies to be addressed within the multi-unit residential compliance path presented by the 12/3/03 NCv2.1 CIR and NCv2.2 Option 3? And how are balconies treated within the option for prohibiting smoking? The credit requirements are not clear in this regard.

Ruling:

Any potential smoking outdoors must be addressed in regards to secondhand smoke exposure. Balconies are automatically considered smoking areas unless smoking on them is prohibited (by the building manager in the case of a leased apartment; by the initial HOA Rules and Regulations in the case of a condominium). For any compliance path, if a balcony does not comply with the requirements for exterior smoking areas (at least 25 feet away from entries, operable windows and outdoor air intakes), smoking must be prohibited on the balcony. LEED projects registered before September 4, 2006, will not be held to this interpretation, but are encouraged to do so. This ruling reflects the original intent of the IEQ Technical Advisory Group and is considered consistent with the non-residential compliance paths and with the mission of green building. The ruling is also considered reasonable because eighty percent of the U.S. population does not smoke.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
8/4/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project team plans to meet the intent of Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control through the use of "Smoking Cabins" and requests an exception to the technical requirements indicated to meet the intent. The smoking cabin is in full compliance with the requirements for ETS Control Systems GS-BGIA-M14 of BGIA (German Institute for Occupational safety and health), soon to be ground for the CEN European standard for Non-smoker protection. It has already been integrated in the law for non smoker protection of some European countries, like Austria. The BGIA tests control how a given cabin limits and eliminates tobacco related particles and gases. The smoking cabin is a small free-standing kind of smoking room, open or closed, where a high air flow ensures immediate capture of all tobacco smoke before it is dispersed in the cabin (contrary to a smoking room where all smoke spreads in the room before being ventilated). Immediate capture (vs ventilation) is a standard technology used in many other industries. The smoke is then purified through a combination of high standards particle filters and active coal gas filters, leaving no traces of tobacco specific particles or gases (cf GS-BGIA-M14). Cabins can be open or closed. The result is the disappearance of all tobacco specific particles and gases under detection level. The following guarantees to reach the intent of ETS Control, even though the technical approach is different: 1. Efficient capture of the smoke is guaranteed by very high air flow, (minimum of 200m3/h per smokers, and 3x times the volume of the cabin per minute), to ensure immediate capture of the smoke before it totally mixes with the air in the cabin. The capture efficiency and the no contamination of adjacent area is tested and proven by BGIA GS-BGIA-M14. 2. Recycling, elimination of particles: particles are removed through the use of absolute filters level HEPA14 -ULPA 15, purifying up to 99,9995% of the MPPS (Most Penetrating Particles - 0,1

Ruling:

The project is requesting an alternative compliance pathway for EQp2: ETS Control, by using indoor smoking cabins with in situ filtration. While air cleaning and dilution ventilation have been found to be helpful in improving visibility and reducing irritation in rooms with tobacco smoking, neither air cleaning nor dilution ventilation have been shown to provide acceptable indoor air quality from a health perspective (e.g. lung cancer, cardiovascular disease etc.). For these reasons, this approach does not meet the intent of the prerequisite and will not be accepted. Applicable Internationally; Germany.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/1/2014
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Are electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) covered under the Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control prerequisite?

Ruling:

Yes, electronic cigarettes are considered a form of smoking for the purposes of both the interior and exterior smoking provisions of the LEED Prerequisite Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control. As recommended in the December 2013 report[1] prepared for the World Health Organization, “e-cigarettes should be prohibited anywhere where the use of conventional cigarettes is prohibited”. The indoor air quality impacts from electronic cigarettes are not fully characterized, but there is sufficient evidence that electronic cigarettes produce emissions in fine aerosol form that can expose building occupants. For example, according to the report, “several chemicals that have been found in e-cigarette aerosol and e-liquid are on California’s official list of known human carcinogens or reproductive toxicants, including nicotine, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, nickel, lead, toluene(1)”.

[1] Background Paper on E-cigarettes (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems); Grana, R.; Benowitz, N.; Glantz, SA; December 2013; University of California

Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes

LEEDuser expert

Virginia Leary

LEED AP BD+C; TRUE Advisor, Fitwel Advisor

WSP USA
Assistant Consultant

See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Unsubscribe from discussions about NC-2009 IEQp2