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LEED v2009
New Construction
Energy and Atmosphere
On-Site Renewable Energy

LEED CREDIT

NC-2009 EAc2: On-Site Renewable Energy 1-7 points

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Credit achievement rate

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Marcus Sheffer

7group / Energy Opportunities
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Credit language

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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To encourage and recognize increasing levels of on-site renewable energy self-supply to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use.

Requirements

Use on-site renewable energy systems to offset building energy costs. Calculate project performance by expressing the energy produced by the renewable systems as a percentage of the building’s annual energy cost and use the table below to determine the number of points achieved. Use the building annual energy cost calculated in EA Credit 1: Optimize Energy Performance or the U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey database to determine the estimated electricity use.The minimum renewable energy percentage for each point threshold is as follows:

Percentage Renewable Energy

Points

1%

1

3%

2

5%

3

7%

4

9%

5

11%

6

13%

7

Pilot ACPs Available

The following pilot alternative compliance path is available for this credit. See the pilot credit library for more information. EApc95: Alternative Energy Performance Metric ACP
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Frequently asked questions

We have a PV array installed on our campus, under the same ownership, but not on the building or within the LEED project boundary. Can we count that toward EAc2?

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Because of how our onsite PV system was financed through the utility, the project is selling the RECs associated with its solar energy production, even though we own the PV array and its power. Is there any way we can earn EAc2?

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Can I pursue this credit if I am using one of the prescriptive compliance paths for EAp2/EAc1?

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Can I really double-count onsite renewable energy in both EAc2 and EAc1?

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Our PV system is being installed after the building is occupied. Is that okay?

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Our project will have a PV system onsite, but it will be installed, operated, and owned by a separate entity that is paying for the system through a premium price per kWh paid by the utility, per state regulations. Is there any way to count this toward the project, in EAc2 or EAc1?

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A biofuel-based cogenerator is being used to produce both electricity and heat (CHP). Can I consider all the energy produced, or just the electricity?

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Can a backup generator qualify, if it runs on biofuels?

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Addenda

7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Delete "Projects outside the U.S. may not use the CBECS option."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the second line, insert "and thermal" after "electrical" so the text becomes "...biofuel-based electrical and thermal systems..."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/1/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Following the last bulleted item, add the following text as a new paragraph:"To qualify as an eligible on-site system, the fuel source must meet one of the following conditions: the fuel source must be wholly contained/produced on-site; the project team must demonstrate full ownership of the fuel source, including ownership of all its environmental attributes; or, if the fuel source is not owned, and in cases where use of a substitute, non-renewable fuel is possible, projects must enter into a 2-year contract for purchase of the renewable fuel source, with an ongoing commitment to renew for a period of 10 years total."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the text with "Biofuel-based electrical and thermal systems (see list of eligible biofuels, below)."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/3/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Remove the text from "The rationale for the 1-for-2 ratio..."through "This allows green building projects to capture the valueof RECs created by on-site renewable while reducing next CO2."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
5/9/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the first bullet, change "200%" to "100%", so that it reads, "RECs equal to 100% of the system\'s..."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
8/26/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our community college campus includes an existing 1.06mW solar field that backfeeds two existing metered services. Additional metered services on the campus are serviced by the utility company campus \'loop\', but are not fed directly by the solar array. The solar array currently accounts for 25% of power provided to the existing campus (documentation available). Two new buildings are under construction on campus. Building A is a new 60,000 s.f., 3-story Office and Administration building, which is fed by one of the two metered electrical services tied directly to the solar array. Building B is a 77,000 s.f., two-story Fine Arts facility, which will require a new metered service from the utility company campus \'loop\', but are not fed directly by the solar array. A CIR Ruling dated 08/13/2007 implies that an existing PV array may be applied to new construction on a campus, therefore we would like to pursue EA credit #2 for both projects. Our intent is to provide documentation to express the anticipated annual energy use of each new building as a percentage of the overall energy use on campus, and to apply the same percentage of the power generated by the solar array towards this credit.

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification on whether or not EAc2 can be pursued for new campus projects when a solar PV array previously exists. Under the LEED Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects (https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=1097) it states: In the case where the renewable energy equipment is not physically located on the applicant building(s), provide data for each building showing the projected energy consumption and the percentage to be met with their prorated or dedicated share of renewable energy. The owner should also submit a certification letter acknowledging that the renewable energy from a central system will apply only to the submitted project(s) and will not be applied to subsequent buildings for any future LEED certifications. Thus, both projects can pursue EAc2, provided a previously undedicated share of renewable energy generated is allocated to each building project. Update April 15, 2011: Please note that all 2009 projects in multiple building situations must follow the 2010 Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects, located here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=7987. 2009 project teams should check this document for up to date guidance on all multiple building issues. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can a waste-to-energy generation facility qualify for EAc2?

Ruling:

Combustion of municipal solid waste is excluded from eligibility of this credit. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/30/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Cold Climate Housing Research Center (CCHRC) is using a high quality wood-burning masonry heater to provide about 10% of its building\'s annual energy budget, directly as heat. Remaining heat is provided by an oil-fired hydronic system, supplemented by solar thermal collectors. We are requesting approval of this masonry heater as a renewable heat source for both EA-1x Energy Optimization and EA-2.3 Renewable Energy on the following grounds: The masonry heater serves as an element of research, training and demonstration for clean and renewable wood heat. The masonry heater is used and managed as part of CCHRC\'s research mission and building operations. It is monitored regularly for temperature, weight of wood input and weight of ash output. The masonry heater is fueled once per business day when heating is required. It provides significant heat for the 2 story east end of the building from its location near an open stairway in the building\'s lobby. Wood used at this facility is sustainably harvested in local woodland and grounds management. Firewood is supplied by CCHRC\'s land owner, University of Alaska Fairbanks, from its maintenance and construction clearing operations. In addition, firewood may be cut on nearby designated, managed State land areas after a permit is obtained: http://forestry.alaska.gov/wood/firewood.html Plentiful, regulated forest land areas near this site make firewood a renewable, local energy source which will be available for the life of the building. The standard \'Envirotech\' masonry heater core ( http://www.timelyconstruction.com/index.htm ) has been tested for particulate emissions by Myren Consulting, Inc., an accredited third party testing agency. Average particulate grams per kg. of wood: ASTM Standard Crib Fuel; 0.8193 g/kg., Cord wood: 0.8155 g/kg. These values meet or exceed those for allowable wood pellet stoves, relieving concerns that incomplete or poor combustion can produce pollution; expressed on page 154 of the Version 2.1 Reference Guide. Masonry heaters also have a burn-efficiency similar to that of oil-fired boilers. Most oil-fired boilers can be set to burn at 85-87% efficiency maximum due to the problems inherent in managing oil-emission condensate that occurs when oil is burned at a higher efficiency rate. Masonry heaters similarly burn the wood at around 85% efficiency. However, CCHRC\'s masonry heater is fired only once per day instead of running continuously through the day. Also, data that we have on PM2.5 emissions clearly shows that masonry heaters contribute fewer PM2.5 emissions to the atmosphere than oil-fired boilers. Furthermore, because the Masonry Heater burns so effectively, CCHRC uses less than 2 cords of wood per year. Masonry heaters are approved under LEED for Homes with where potential for \'backdraft\' is minimized and has been documented. The masonry heater in this building meets these requirements. In addition, atmospheric pressure inside the building is monitored by the building automation system, which can notify the building manager in the unlikely event that significant negative pressure occurs. In conclusion, we believe the masonry heater should be credited for this project because its fuel is renewable & low in embodied energy, its particulate emissions are lower than the oil boilers, and its use is carefully measured & managed. It benefits the environment by lowering fossil fuel consumption and carbon footprint.

Ruling:

The project is seeking clarification that the firewood supplied by the land owner as well as wood harvested from a neighboring state forest can be considered as renewable source for EAc2. The project team is using a high quality wood-burning masonry heater. It is acceptable to use forest residue provided it is obtained from a sustainably managed source and harvested from a site that is contiguous to the project site and has the same owner. Provide documentation consisting of a Sustainability Management plan for the local woodland and any permits from state forests. The documentation should also include quantified energy demand and supply relationships. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The LEED EB:O&M Reference Guide does not specify precisely when during the LEED application review process Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) must be purchased, it only requires that the RECs meet specific percentages of the building\'s total energy use from the performance period.Our project team would like to wait until after the final review to file an appeal in order to purchase RECs and have EAc4 points included in the project\'s total before accepting certification.Can EAc4 thresholds be met by RECs purchased after the final review when filed through the appeal process?

Ruling:

A project team may elect to add and pursue EA c4 as part of an appeal after the project building\'s performance period has ended and after the Final Review has been completed and purchase RECs at that time, as long as the RECs purchased are based on the total annual site energy usage value reported for EAp2 and are allocated to the project building only. Note that at the time of appeal submittal, the project must have entered into a contract or commitment for future purchases to meet the 2-year requirement. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/18/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can a third party such as a utility company install and operate a Solar PV system on the rooftop of a LEED project, and can the owner achieve EA c2 credit (1%) and possibly an exemplary performance credit (5%) for Core and Shell V2.0 rating system? Intent of Credit: Encourage and recognize increasing levels of on-site renewable energy self-supply in order to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use. Approach: A new program has been initiated in the San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E)territory named Clean Energy Systems. The objective of this program is to find usable roof space (at least 5,000 sf)in high performance buildings such as this project where a Solar PV system can be installed, operated, and maintained by SDG&E. The impetus for this unique program is to use available secure roof top space to increase its renewable energy system portfolio that will help SDG&E get to its 20% overall renewable energy portfolio as required by California State Law. It would be the intent of SDG&E to sign a long-term lease space contract with the Owner of this project and install at least 5,000 sf of Solar PV array up on the roof of this and possibly the other two future buildings (Buildings B and C)in this core and shell complex. As mentioned previously, the motivation of SDG&E will be to grid-tie this renewable energy to assist them in achieving the 20% portfolio threshold. The motivation of the Owner is to achieve at least one and maybe two LEED points even though they will not necessarily be using electricity generated from the Solar PV system. The owner would sign a contract with SDG&E before this project is submitted via LEED Online sometime in the Fall of this year 2008. We would provide evidence to this plus an implementation schedule for installation of the system on at least Building A during design submittals. Confirmation of Credit Intent: We believe this approach does meet the intent of the credit providing renewable energy self-supply in order to reduce the environmental effects of fossil fuel consumption (aka global warming)while providing the developer with very needed LEED points in order to achieve LEED Silver for its Building A project. We also believe that this approach will be occurring more frequently in the near future with progressive utilities offering to lease roof space on LEED-registered buildings for independent Solar PV farms. Please verify that this approach summarized above does fulfill the intent of Credit EA c2.

Ruling:

The installation of on-site renewable energy sources owned and operated by an entity other than the building owner is allowable for achievement of EAc2 and has been addressed by a previous CIR dated 7/19/2007, provided the following conditions are met: [1] The renewable energy system must be installed within the boundaries of the project or on the project site. [2] The renewable energy system is connected immediately adjacent to the utility meter. [3] A 10-year (minimum) contract for on-site generation with the owner of the energy system must be established. [4] The Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) associated with the renewable energy system may not be sold. [5] The renewable energy system owner may not count the RECs associated with the renewable energy system to meet a mandated renewable portfolio standard goal or provide RECs to the project owner. The proposed renewable energy system does not appear to meet condition [5] since SDG&E is proposing the renewable energy system installation in order to meet a 20% renewable energy portfolio goal. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/16/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The mechanical systems for this project are geothermal in nature. Water is extracted from a 250\' deep well drilled into quartzite bedrock and extracted at approximately 51

Ruling:

The system as described in the CIR is a combined passive geothermal heat exchange / ground source heat pump system. Per the v2.1 Reference Guide (pages 155 and 157) these types of systems do not qualify for points under this category because they do not generate energy. In general, environmental heat sources and sinks with a low temperature difference relative to room air conditions are not considered renewable energy sources in EAc2 in LEED-NC v2.1 or v2.2. The energy saving benefits of these types of systems may be applied to EAc1 calculations. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Is it acceptable to use a mix of 10% biofuel and 90% natural gas to meet the requirements of EAc2, and is there a minimum time period for which the biofuel must be purchased from the utility company?

Ruling:

For biofuels to qualify, the bio-gas system must meet the requirements as per table 3 of EAc2 as per the LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide and a signed declaration from the provider that clearly shows the source must be provided. The intent is for a portion of the building\'s energy to come from biofuel for the duration of its existence. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/1/2014
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project team is planning on installing a Cogeneration System that will take Biogas and turn it into Electricity to be used wholly on-site. The heat produced by this Cogeneration system will also fully be used on-site to preheat heating hot water and domestic hot water via a heat exchanger and potentially to power an absorption chiller.The building will receive the Biogas from a local Biogas provider and plans to enter into at least a 10 year contract with this provider to supply enough Biogas to the building to fully power the planned Cogeneration system. The contract will stipulate both that enough Biogas will be fed into the pipeline to meet required demands of the Cogeneration system and that the Biogas will be metered to prove that the actual amount of Biogas supplied meets the contracted requirements at all times.Though the Biogas is not being piped exclusively to the site (contractually it is supplied exclusively via project ownership funds), it is transported directly to the site in the existing natural gas pipeline. This approach achieves the exact same net result on the Natural Gas grid as piping Biogas exclusively to the project site in its own dedicated pipeline and allows the project to avoid having to dig up 100s of miles of land and lay a brand new pipeline to the project, something that would have a significantly detrimental effect on the local environment. In an urban environment like where the project is located, there is little or no option to be able to refine and extract Biogas on-site or even very close to a site, so the approach the project team is suggesting is the best and most reasonable alternative.Is this approach acceptable in accordance with the Reference Guide and Addendum 100001081 (November 1, 2011)?

Ruling:

Directed Biogas purchase is not considered on-site renewable energy based on the current EAc2 credit requirements, addenda and LEED Interpretations, because the gas consumed on-site is not the same as the biogas that the project purchased. Please note that the referenced Addendum 100001081 does not allow for the fuel used on site to be different than the fuel that was purchased for the project. The referenced addendum applies for situations such as landfill gas piped directly to the project from a nearby landfill, or wood pellets from wood mill residue that are trucked to the project. In either case, it would not be acceptable for the landfill gas or pellets generated from wood mill residue to be "purchased" by the project, used in another project, and replaced in the project with natural gas or wood pellets produced from tree tops. Also, note that NREL refers to directed biogas as off-site renewable energy.

Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/19/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This is an administrative ruling posted by USGBC updating the conditions that must be met for a project to take credit for renewable energy under EAc2.

Ruling:

A previous ruling (EAc2.1 CIR Ruling 10-03-2006), defined conditions that must be met for projects to qualify for renewable energy credits under EAc2. This ruling updates the previous ruling defining alternative conditions for projects to qualify for EAc2 renewable energy credits. A project will be eligible to achieve points under EAc2 and qualify for renewable energy credits for the system under EAc1 if the project meets the following conditions: 1 The renewable energy system is installed within the boundaries of the project or on the project site. 2 The renewable energy system is connected immediately adjacent to the utility meter. 3 A 10-year (minimum) contract for on-site generation with the owner of the Energy System is established. 4 The RECs associated with the renewable energy system are not sold. 5 The Energy System owner does not count the RECs associated with the renewable energy system to meet a mandated renewable portfolio standard goal or provides the RECs to the project owner. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Are Ecoenergy labeled electricity products applicable for LEED EB O&M EA credit 4: Renewable energy?

Ruling:

Ecoenergy-labeled electricity products can qualify for EAc4 provided that equivalency with Green-e certification is demonstrated by the project team. The Green-e standard is located on their website: http://wee.green-e.org

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/4/2016
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We would like to confirm the applicability of a District Lake Source Cooling (LSC) operation as an eligible on-site renewable energy source for LEED NC 2009 and LEED v4 BD+C. This innovative Lake Source Cooling facility, which has been in operation since 2000, uses the deep cold waters of a large lake as a non-contact renewable cooling source for a campus chilled water system. At a depth of ~250ft the bottom of the lake maintains a steady year-round temperature of 39-41 F. The only energy used in the system is pumping energy and the system has demonstrated an 86% reduction in energy use over conventional water cooled chiller. Extensive environmental impact studies were carried out prior to and after operation and all have concluded that adverse environmental impacts have been minimized or avoided. It does not use any vapor compression cycle and no water is wasted.

The LEED 2009 Reference Guide states "geothermal energy systems using deep-earth water or steam sources (but not vapor compression systems for heat transfer) may be eligible for this credit." The project team proposes to account for the renewable energy credit by calculating savings between the proposed case model with LSC system and a proposed case model with conventional refrigeration system that complies with the ASHRAE 90.1 code requirements.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting whether deep-water Lake Source Cooling that replaces the refrigeration cycle for the campus central plant system may be used to claim credit for on-site renewable energy for the project under EA Credit 2: Renewable Energy Generation. The proposed approach is not acceptable since the lake source cooling does not qualify as a geothermal energy source using deep water or steam sources. Furthermore, the resource would be depleted and would have a negative environmental impact if the cooling capacity were increased exponentially (i.e. the resource provides increasingly less environmental benefit for other/subsequent projects beyond this one); therefore it is not considered on-site renewable energy.

It is noted that the proposed approach is an extremely efficient form of cooling, and while no credit is allowed as an on-site renewable source, significant credit would be achieved for EA Credit 1: Optimize Energy Performance using the ASHRAE 90.1 Appendix G modeling processes.

Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
8/21/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is installing a photovoltaic system that will be directly connected to the building\'s energy system, and which will be net-metered with the utility grid. The system is being financed through a power purchase agreement, which requires selling of the RECs to the public utility. A number of Credit Interpretation Rulings have been issued regarding the conditions which must be met for a project to qualify for renewable energy credits under EAc2. These CIRs seem to provide conflicting language. We are seeking clarification regarding these conditions for LEED-NCv2.2 and LEED-CSv2.0 projects. - CIRs dated 10/3/2006 and 5/16/2006 state that the sale of RECs is allowed from an on-site renewable energy system that claims credit under EAc2 if the building owner or energy system owner purchases a total amount of RECs equal to 200% of the system\'s annual rated energy output each year from another source, which must be Green-e eligible. Per the CIRs, the seller of the on-site RECs must also follow all established guidelines for the sale of RECs and not claim any of the environmental attributes for the on-site system. - An administrative ruling dated 7/19/2007, which updates conditions for on-site renewable systems to achieve EAc2 points, does not make reference to the purchase of 200% RECs as an acceptable method of credit achievement. - However, the same 200% REC purchase compliance path is also outlined in the new LEED 2009 BD&C Reference Guide. - A CIR dated April 15, 2009 rules that a project that hosts a PV system, which does not use the PV and/or the PV is fully financed, owned and sold to third parties, can achieve EAc2 by purchasing a total amount of RECs equal to 100% of the system\'s annual rated energy output. Please confirm that a project pursuing EAc2 under LEED-NC v2.2 (or LEED-CSv2.0) can achieve EAc2 points by utilizing the 200% REC purchase methodology as outlined in the 2006 CIRs and 2009 BD&C Reference Guide, or the 100% REC purchase methodology outlined in the 2009 CIR. We are also seeking clarification regarding the length of time for which RECs must be purchased. The 5/16/2006 CIR states that RECs must be purchased "each year." Does this mean that RECs must be purchased each year that the system\'s RECs are sold, indefinitely? Alternatively, the 10/3/2006 CIR states that RECs must be purchased for at least ten years. Please clarify if the REC purchase is required for 10 years, or for the entire length of the utility REC purchase agreement.

Ruling:

The applicant is asking for clarification on the quantity and length of time for which RECs need to be purchased in order to achieve credit for On-Site Renewable energy that is sold to the grid. Most of the various CIRs referenced by the applicant are relevant; some of these rulings appear to add confusion to the quantity of RECs that are needed. It has been determined that the project can achieve EAc2 by purchasing a total amount of RECs equal to 100% of the system\'s annual rated energy output. There must be at least a 10-year contract for the purchase of the energy output. This CIR supersedes the 200% requirement set by the CIR Ruling dated 5/16/2006. Please note this CIR only dictates the quantity of RECs and the duration and other requirements related to documentation and green-e stay valid as stated in the 5/16/2006 and other CIRs.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY (EA CREDIT 2)MULTIPLE CAMPUS SPECIAL ALLOWANCE FOR K-12 SCHOOL DISTRICTSThe following request is intended to allow K-12 school districts with multiple campuses and multiple LEED projects, to optimize the design, installation and cost of on-site renewable energy systems.It is very difficult for older school districts to find sufficient suitable land, parking areas, and structurally adequate building rooftops, on campuses in urban areas, for the installation of renewable energy systems. One campus may have suitable areas while another has no suitable areas. The intent of this LEED interpretation is to allow the one campus within a school district to serve as the on-site renewable systems location for other campuses.This request would allow districts to have renewable energy systems in one, or more, centralized areas, and would help optimize the cost and allocation of energy generated by such systems across multiple projects. A school district with multiple campuses is currently forced to located renewables energy systems within a campus boundary. Large corporations and large universities are allowed to located centralized renewable energy systems to serve multiple LEED projects that can separated far from each other. This seems like an unfair benefit intended to help the large property owners. The benefit should be extended to K-12 school districts.Although this LEED interpretation is written based on K-12 schools the USGBC may wish to extend this allowance to other LEED project types.For such an allowance to meet the intent of LEED we believe several restrictions should be applied to avoid issues related to owners of multiple properties that the USGBC might be concerned with. The USGBC should adjust and revise the restrictions below to address any issues we may have not considered such that the intent of LEED is met. A possible list of restrictions is provided below for use by the USGBC in developing criteria for this multiple-campus request.1. Multiple campus properties must all be owned by the same owner. [The USGBC may decide to allow leased properties to be included if certain criteria is met; e.g, length of lease similar to LEED-CI requirements.]2. The school district must make a commitment and register at least two projects for LEED certification.3. Each school district property claimed, either as a LEED project or renewables energy generation site, must be located in the same energy services utility district.4. The K-12 school district boundary area must be contiguous, or maximum distance encompassing the campuses of no greater than 10 miles square (10 x 10 miles). Exceptions to this requirement will be evaluated on their merits.5. All LEED School Rating systems can use this interpretation, however, specific renewable energy requirements must be met for each different rating system version.6. The energy generation generation of each separate renewable systems location can be aggregated together. This will create an overall renewable energy generation value that can then be distributed to separate projects. The energy generation of each separate renewable project location must be evaluated based on the renewable energy resources available at each specific location. For example, if the solar energy systems are used the solar energy generation must be based on the actual solar resources for a specific renewable energy source location.

Ruling:

For campus-based projects, such as schools or office complexes, where multiple campuses are under the same ownership, it is permissible to allow one campus to serve as the on-site renewable systems location for other campuses, provided the following criteria have been met:1. Multiple campus properties must all be owned by the same owner. 2. All projects pursuing credit for renewable energy using this compliance path must be registered within 5 years of the initial date of operation of the renewable energy system. 3. All campuses must be within ten miles of one another (exceptions to this requirement will be evaluated on their merits). Documentation showing boundary and owner information must be submitted with the initial project application, as well as a complete list that includes all projects submitting for LEED certification and all campus on-site renewable energy sites included within this strategy. 4. The energy generation of each separate renewable systems location can be aggregated together, creating an overall renewable energy generation value that can then be distributed to separate projects. The energy generation of each separate renewable project location must be evaluated based on the renewable energy resources available at each specific location. A letter from the owner must be submitted indicating the amount of site-generated renewable energy allocated to each project building, and verifying that the renewable energy allocated to each project will not be used for any other LEED project certifications (except EB:O&M certifications for projects certified using this methodology). Furthermore, the letter should indicate that the RECs from the installed system belong to the property owner, and have not been sold or given away. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/9/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Question: Are perforated metal wall solar air heating systems eligible for credit under LEED CS EAc2?" Background: The intent of the credit is to "encourage and recognize increasing levels of on-site renewable energy self-supply in order to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use." "Renewable Energy Systems Eligible for EA Credit 2", "Solar Thermal Systems" (p. 224) states "Active solar thermal energy systems that employ collection panels; heat transfer mechanical components such as pumps or fans, and a defined heat storage system, such as a hot water tank are eligible for this credit." "Systems Not Eligible for EA Credit 2" (p. 224) states excludes "architectural passive solar and daylighting strategies provide savings that are chiefly efficiency related". Perforated metal wall solar air heating systems include a collector panel (the wall) and a heat transfer mechanical component (fan or fans) but typically do not include a defined thermal storage component. Natural Resources Canada considers these to be active systems ("Total energy savings result from four different mechanisms: [including] active solar heating of ventilation air" http://www.canren.gc.ca/renew_ene/index.asp?CaID=50&PgID=347)

Ruling:

The perforated metal wall solar air heating system described is considered an active system and therefore can contribute toward EA Credit 2. The applicant should note that there are no previously approved calculators for the amount of energy offset by such a system and therefore, the applicant must provide detailed calculations, including all assumptions and applicable weather data, during the review process. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our Campus has a 780 kW PV system installed as a joint venture with a Utility, which was made possible by partial funding from the sale of the REC\'s. The system is installed on 10 existing random building rooftops, with another 136 kW phase nearly commissioned on/near a sports field. We pay a small kWh premium, and will take full ownership after 20 years. PV output is dedicated for campus use, utilizing a combination of direct building connections and connections to the campus owned grid. We would like to apply for EAc2 on a campus basis for approximately 9 separate building projects that do not include their own individual PV installations. The cost to buy REC\'s for 10 years for the entire campus system is prohibitive under our current construction budgets. We propose that individual LEED Building Projects apply for EAC2 using the existing onsite PV renewable source, and buy 10-year REC\'s for 100% of the power claimed on the Template, as qualifying on-site renewable energy. The project REC\'s would be redeemed and solely retained by the individual Building Projects, and would not be shared for use on any other projects. Would purchasing REC\'s then restore the "associated environmental benefit" to the on-site generated renewable project energy claimed; and meet the sustainable intent of the credit as indicated in the CIR Ruling dated 7/20/2009?

Ruling:

The CIR Ruling dated 7/20/2009 (#2616), states that if the project sold renewable energy certificates associated with the on-site renewable energy system, the team may not take credit for the system under EAc2, since the system would have no associated environmental benefit. The project teams approach of purchasing 10-year REC\'s for 100% of the power claimed on the Template, to restore the associated environmental benefit is acceptable. The project must provide sufficient documentation to ensure the portion of the on-site renewable energy system designated for each building is not used on other projects. Additionally, the project team should provide documentation, including contractual terms, to verify the purchase of the necessary volume of REC\'s. The project team may not apply any of the REC\'s purchased to restore the associated environmental benefits of the on-site renewable energy system for the purposes of achieving EAc2 towards achieving EAc6, Green Power.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/1/2014
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can the definition of renewable energy sources be modified to include all clean urban wood waste, invasive species, habitat restoration programs, clean industrial wood waste (pallets), and tree tops left over from logging operations?

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting that the definition of renewable energy sources be modified to include all clean urban wood waste, invasive species, habitat restoration programs, clean industrial wood waste (pallets), and tree tops left over from logging operations as a renewable sources of energy for this project. The wood, which the applicant claims would otherwise be diverted to a landfill or burned in piles, is collected from local municipals. The collected wood is then used by the District Energy plant, which includes a Combined Heat and Power plant that is fueled mostly by wood waste.The project may expand the definition of renewables to include tree slashings, invasive species, clean urban wood waste, habitat restoration programs, tree tops left over from logging operations and related clean wood processing with the following additional requirements:
1. The wood must be harvested within twenty-five miles of the CHP plant. Note that LEED Interpretations #2591 and #5332 both require that the project be contiguous to the location where the wood is harvested, so this ruling is considered to be less stringent than previous LEED Interpretations regarding this issue.
2. The district energy owner must either own the rights to the wood; or the district energy provider must have a ten-year contract for the rights to the wood. Note that LEED Interpretations #2591 and #5332 both require that the project team own the wood source, so this ruling is considered to be less stringent than previous LEED Interpretations regarding this issue. Evidence of ownership or a contract with the owner of the wood should be submitted as part of the LEED submittal.
3. Additional documentation should be provided to document that the wood would otherwise be diverted to landfill or directly burned.
4. Information should be provided documenting the air quality measures that will be implemented to limit the particulate and greenhouse gas emissions for the wood-burning Combined Heat and Power plant to be less than or equal to those for a coal-fired plant with similar generation and thermal energy capacities.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/15/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 238,000 SF brick manufacturing facility in Terre Haute, Indiana. The project consists of 5,000 SF of office space and 233,000 SF of manufacturing area, including extrusion, drying, and kiln equipment. The energy required for the manufacturing process exceeds 90% of the facility\'s total energy load. We are submitting a separate CIR to address quantifying energy savings for the manufacturing process. In the brick industry, the typical manufacturing process (specifically the kiln) utilizes natural gas as a primary energy source. To maximize energy savings and reduce the environmental and economic impact of brick-making, our Client has selected a site that is directly adjacent to a municipal landfill, with plans to fuel the kiln with methane off-gassing from the landfill. Currently, the methane is collected, burned, and flared directly into the atmosphere; however, it can be contained, cleaned and pressurized so that it may be used constructively in lieu of natural gas. Our Client has obtained permission from the landfill to tap into this energy source. As part of our project scope, we will install compressors and an underground pipeline to transport the landfill gas to the manufacturing facility. This will replace the majority of natural gas that powers the kiln and vastly reduce the amount of on-grid energy required by the facility. Our Client will install and maintain all equipment required to prepare, transport, and apply this methane to the manufacturing process. Other than allowing us to tap into this un-used resource, the operator of the landfill will have no involvement or responsibility in this venture. Please verify that landfill off-gassing qualifies for credit under EA credit 2 in this case, even though the landfill itself is not owned by our client or located within our project site. We will calculate renewable energy as a percentage of the total building annual energy cost, including process energy.

Ruling:

Yes, the system described meets the requirements needed to achieve credit under EAc2, despite the fact that the source of the energy (here, the landfill gas) is not directly on site. Because the project owner will install and maintain the equipment for the land fill gas extraction, and be the sole user of the gas, the renewable energy system falls under the LEED scope of the project and can effectively be considered "on-site." However, in order for this project to achieve LEED-NC v2.2 EAc2 credits, the following conditions need to be met: 1) Because the landfill gas will be used to in lieu of natural gas in a manufacturing process, the full process loads must be included in all energy cost and use estimates, whether or not the project is attempting to earn any credits under EAc1 (it is not clear from the CIR if full energy modeling will be performed for this credit). As per LEED-NC v2.2 EAc1 CIR ruling dated 5/13/2007, a full description will need to be provided of how the baseline and proposed energy usage were estimated for the project, as industrial energy usage does not fall under the purview of ASHRAE 90.1-2004. Because of the nature of this project, the EAc2 compliance path using CBECS data to estimate annual energy costs is not appropriate. 2) As per the LEED-NC v2.2 EAc2 Reference Guide language, the method used to predict the quantity of energy generated by on-site renewable systems should be clearly stated in the LEED submittal narrative... Cost savings from renewable energy systems\' shall be reported exclusive of energy costs associated with system operation (i.e., deduct energy costs of pumps, fans, and other auxiliary devices). 3) Because the landfill is on municipal property, but the gas extraction system will be privately owned by the project owner, a clear chain of custody for rights to the gas and the associated Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) needs to be documented. Based on the documentation requirements outlined in the LEED-NC v2.1 EAc2.1CIR ruling dated 10/3/2006 (which specifically addressed third party ownership of a renewable energy system) the following requirements need to be met: A. There is a minimum 10-year contract with the local municipality to secure the rights to the landfill gas that will be used in the project. B. There must be clear documentation for accounting purposes whether the purchase includes the RECs or just the landfill gas. C. If the purchase does not include the RECs, the building owner or energy system owner must make the 200% offset REC purchase described in the first portion of the CIR for at least 10 years. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

For two new buildings being constructed on a campus with an existing solar farm, is it acceptable to submit both these buildings for EAc2, provided that the total amount of energy for which credit is being sought is less than the amount produced by the farm?

Ruling:

The proposed methodology is acceptable as long as the documentation is provided verifying what percentage of the solar farm is supporting each building and as long as the projected project cost for each project is consistent with the percentage of the solar farm that would need to be installed to support that building. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/1/2014
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

To encourage increasing levels of on-site renewable energy while recognizing that facilities with high process loads may not have the physical space available to install enough renewable energy equipment to meet the current LEED point thresholds, the following path is available for buildings where more than 60% of the estimated annual proposed building energy consumption comes from non-regulated loads.

Ruling:

1. Install on-site renewable energy systems such that the estimated annual renewable energy production meets or exceeds the kWh thresholds in the table below.

OR

2. Install on-site renewable energy systems such that the percentage of building’s annual regulated load energy cost produced by the renewable energy systems meets or exceeds the thresholds shown in the table below.

To achieve points, the project must use the option above that requires the greatest amount of renewable energy.

To help ensure high process load buildings are pursuing this alternative compliance path only after optimizing their energy performance, the total points achieved for EA credit 2, On-Site Renewable Energy, cannot exceed the points achieved for EA credit 1, Optimize Energy Performance.

Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) and other environmental attributes associated with the renewable energy must be retired and cannot be sold or used to meet regulatory obligations.

EAc1 and EAc2: 1 Point - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 150,000 - % Regulated Load: 3%
EAc1 and EAc2: 2 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 450,000 - % Regulated Load: 8%
EAc1 and EAc2: 3 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 750,000 - % Regulated Load: 13%
EAc1 and EAc2: 4 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 1,050,000 - % Regulated Load: 18%
EAc1 and EAc2: 5 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 1,350,000 - % Regulated Load: 23%
EAc1 and EAc2: 6 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 1,650,000 - % Regulated Load: 28%
EAc1 and EAc2: 7 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 1,950,000 - % Regulated Load: 33%

Note: % regulated load figures calculated by dividing whole building percentage targets by 40%

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
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Intent

To encourage and recognize increasing levels of on-site renewable energy self-supply to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use.

Requirements

Use on-site renewable energy systems to offset building energy costs. Calculate project performance by expressing the energy produced by the renewable systems as a percentage of the building’s annual energy cost and use the table below to determine the number of points achieved. Use the building annual energy cost calculated in EA Credit 1: Optimize Energy Performance or the U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey database to determine the estimated electricity use.The minimum renewable energy percentage for each point threshold is as follows:

Percentage Renewable Energy

Points

1%

1

3%

2

5%

3

7%

4

9%

5

11%

6

13%

7

Pilot ACPs Available

The following pilot alternative compliance path is available for this credit. See the pilot credit library for more information. EApc95: Alternative Energy Performance Metric ACP

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We have a PV array installed on our campus, under the same ownership, but not on the building or within the LEED project boundary. Can we count that toward EAc2?

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Because of how our onsite PV system was financed through the utility, the project is selling the RECs associated with its solar energy production, even though we own the PV array and its power. Is there any way we can earn EAc2?

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Can I pursue this credit if I am using one of the prescriptive compliance paths for EAp2/EAc1?

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Can I really double-count onsite renewable energy in both EAc2 and EAc1?

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Our PV system is being installed after the building is occupied. Is that okay?

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Our project will have a PV system onsite, but it will be installed, operated, and owned by a separate entity that is paying for the system through a premium price per kWh paid by the utility, per state regulations. Is there any way to count this toward the project, in EAc2 or EAc1?

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A biofuel-based cogenerator is being used to produce both electricity and heat (CHP). Can I consider all the energy produced, or just the electricity?

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7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Delete "Projects outside the U.S. may not use the CBECS option."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the second line, insert "and thermal" after "electrical" so the text becomes "...biofuel-based electrical and thermal systems..."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/1/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Following the last bulleted item, add the following text as a new paragraph:"To qualify as an eligible on-site system, the fuel source must meet one of the following conditions: the fuel source must be wholly contained/produced on-site; the project team must demonstrate full ownership of the fuel source, including ownership of all its environmental attributes; or, if the fuel source is not owned, and in cases where use of a substitute, non-renewable fuel is possible, projects must enter into a 2-year contract for purchase of the renewable fuel source, with an ongoing commitment to renew for a period of 10 years total."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the text with "Biofuel-based electrical and thermal systems (see list of eligible biofuels, below)."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/3/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Remove the text from "The rationale for the 1-for-2 ratio..."through "This allows green building projects to capture the valueof RECs created by on-site renewable while reducing next CO2."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
5/9/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the first bullet, change "200%" to "100%", so that it reads, "RECs equal to 100% of the system\'s..."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
8/26/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our community college campus includes an existing 1.06mW solar field that backfeeds two existing metered services. Additional metered services on the campus are serviced by the utility company campus \'loop\', but are not fed directly by the solar array. The solar array currently accounts for 25% of power provided to the existing campus (documentation available). Two new buildings are under construction on campus. Building A is a new 60,000 s.f., 3-story Office and Administration building, which is fed by one of the two metered electrical services tied directly to the solar array. Building B is a 77,000 s.f., two-story Fine Arts facility, which will require a new metered service from the utility company campus \'loop\', but are not fed directly by the solar array. A CIR Ruling dated 08/13/2007 implies that an existing PV array may be applied to new construction on a campus, therefore we would like to pursue EA credit #2 for both projects. Our intent is to provide documentation to express the anticipated annual energy use of each new building as a percentage of the overall energy use on campus, and to apply the same percentage of the power generated by the solar array towards this credit.

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification on whether or not EAc2 can be pursued for new campus projects when a solar PV array previously exists. Under the LEED Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects (https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=1097) it states: In the case where the renewable energy equipment is not physically located on the applicant building(s), provide data for each building showing the projected energy consumption and the percentage to be met with their prorated or dedicated share of renewable energy. The owner should also submit a certification letter acknowledging that the renewable energy from a central system will apply only to the submitted project(s) and will not be applied to subsequent buildings for any future LEED certifications. Thus, both projects can pursue EAc2, provided a previously undedicated share of renewable energy generated is allocated to each building project. Update April 15, 2011: Please note that all 2009 projects in multiple building situations must follow the 2010 Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects, located here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=7987. 2009 project teams should check this document for up to date guidance on all multiple building issues. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can a waste-to-energy generation facility qualify for EAc2?

Ruling:

Combustion of municipal solid waste is excluded from eligibility of this credit. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/30/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Cold Climate Housing Research Center (CCHRC) is using a high quality wood-burning masonry heater to provide about 10% of its building\'s annual energy budget, directly as heat. Remaining heat is provided by an oil-fired hydronic system, supplemented by solar thermal collectors. We are requesting approval of this masonry heater as a renewable heat source for both EA-1x Energy Optimization and EA-2.3 Renewable Energy on the following grounds: The masonry heater serves as an element of research, training and demonstration for clean and renewable wood heat. The masonry heater is used and managed as part of CCHRC\'s research mission and building operations. It is monitored regularly for temperature, weight of wood input and weight of ash output. The masonry heater is fueled once per business day when heating is required. It provides significant heat for the 2 story east end of the building from its location near an open stairway in the building\'s lobby. Wood used at this facility is sustainably harvested in local woodland and grounds management. Firewood is supplied by CCHRC\'s land owner, University of Alaska Fairbanks, from its maintenance and construction clearing operations. In addition, firewood may be cut on nearby designated, managed State land areas after a permit is obtained: http://forestry.alaska.gov/wood/firewood.html Plentiful, regulated forest land areas near this site make firewood a renewable, local energy source which will be available for the life of the building. The standard \'Envirotech\' masonry heater core ( http://www.timelyconstruction.com/index.htm ) has been tested for particulate emissions by Myren Consulting, Inc., an accredited third party testing agency. Average particulate grams per kg. of wood: ASTM Standard Crib Fuel; 0.8193 g/kg., Cord wood: 0.8155 g/kg. These values meet or exceed those for allowable wood pellet stoves, relieving concerns that incomplete or poor combustion can produce pollution; expressed on page 154 of the Version 2.1 Reference Guide. Masonry heaters also have a burn-efficiency similar to that of oil-fired boilers. Most oil-fired boilers can be set to burn at 85-87% efficiency maximum due to the problems inherent in managing oil-emission condensate that occurs when oil is burned at a higher efficiency rate. Masonry heaters similarly burn the wood at around 85% efficiency. However, CCHRC\'s masonry heater is fired only once per day instead of running continuously through the day. Also, data that we have on PM2.5 emissions clearly shows that masonry heaters contribute fewer PM2.5 emissions to the atmosphere than oil-fired boilers. Furthermore, because the Masonry Heater burns so effectively, CCHRC uses less than 2 cords of wood per year. Masonry heaters are approved under LEED for Homes with where potential for \'backdraft\' is minimized and has been documented. The masonry heater in this building meets these requirements. In addition, atmospheric pressure inside the building is monitored by the building automation system, which can notify the building manager in the unlikely event that significant negative pressure occurs. In conclusion, we believe the masonry heater should be credited for this project because its fuel is renewable & low in embodied energy, its particulate emissions are lower than the oil boilers, and its use is carefully measured & managed. It benefits the environment by lowering fossil fuel consumption and carbon footprint.

Ruling:

The project is seeking clarification that the firewood supplied by the land owner as well as wood harvested from a neighboring state forest can be considered as renewable source for EAc2. The project team is using a high quality wood-burning masonry heater. It is acceptable to use forest residue provided it is obtained from a sustainably managed source and harvested from a site that is contiguous to the project site and has the same owner. Provide documentation consisting of a Sustainability Management plan for the local woodland and any permits from state forests. The documentation should also include quantified energy demand and supply relationships. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The LEED EB:O&M Reference Guide does not specify precisely when during the LEED application review process Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) must be purchased, it only requires that the RECs meet specific percentages of the building\'s total energy use from the performance period.Our project team would like to wait until after the final review to file an appeal in order to purchase RECs and have EAc4 points included in the project\'s total before accepting certification.Can EAc4 thresholds be met by RECs purchased after the final review when filed through the appeal process?

Ruling:

A project team may elect to add and pursue EA c4 as part of an appeal after the project building\'s performance period has ended and after the Final Review has been completed and purchase RECs at that time, as long as the RECs purchased are based on the total annual site energy usage value reported for EAp2 and are allocated to the project building only. Note that at the time of appeal submittal, the project must have entered into a contract or commitment for future purchases to meet the 2-year requirement. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/18/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can a third party such as a utility company install and operate a Solar PV system on the rooftop of a LEED project, and can the owner achieve EA c2 credit (1%) and possibly an exemplary performance credit (5%) for Core and Shell V2.0 rating system? Intent of Credit: Encourage and recognize increasing levels of on-site renewable energy self-supply in order to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use. Approach: A new program has been initiated in the San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E)territory named Clean Energy Systems. The objective of this program is to find usable roof space (at least 5,000 sf)in high performance buildings such as this project where a Solar PV system can be installed, operated, and maintained by SDG&E. The impetus for this unique program is to use available secure roof top space to increase its renewable energy system portfolio that will help SDG&E get to its 20% overall renewable energy portfolio as required by California State Law. It would be the intent of SDG&E to sign a long-term lease space contract with the Owner of this project and install at least 5,000 sf of Solar PV array up on the roof of this and possibly the other two future buildings (Buildings B and C)in this core and shell complex. As mentioned previously, the motivation of SDG&E will be to grid-tie this renewable energy to assist them in achieving the 20% portfolio threshold. The motivation of the Owner is to achieve at least one and maybe two LEED points even though they will not necessarily be using electricity generated from the Solar PV system. The owner would sign a contract with SDG&E before this project is submitted via LEED Online sometime in the Fall of this year 2008. We would provide evidence to this plus an implementation schedule for installation of the system on at least Building A during design submittals. Confirmation of Credit Intent: We believe this approach does meet the intent of the credit providing renewable energy self-supply in order to reduce the environmental effects of fossil fuel consumption (aka global warming)while providing the developer with very needed LEED points in order to achieve LEED Silver for its Building A project. We also believe that this approach will be occurring more frequently in the near future with progressive utilities offering to lease roof space on LEED-registered buildings for independent Solar PV farms. Please verify that this approach summarized above does fulfill the intent of Credit EA c2.

Ruling:

The installation of on-site renewable energy sources owned and operated by an entity other than the building owner is allowable for achievement of EAc2 and has been addressed by a previous CIR dated 7/19/2007, provided the following conditions are met: [1] The renewable energy system must be installed within the boundaries of the project or on the project site. [2] The renewable energy system is connected immediately adjacent to the utility meter. [3] A 10-year (minimum) contract for on-site generation with the owner of the energy system must be established. [4] The Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) associated with the renewable energy system may not be sold. [5] The renewable energy system owner may not count the RECs associated with the renewable energy system to meet a mandated renewable portfolio standard goal or provide RECs to the project owner. The proposed renewable energy system does not appear to meet condition [5] since SDG&E is proposing the renewable energy system installation in order to meet a 20% renewable energy portfolio goal. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/16/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The mechanical systems for this project are geothermal in nature. Water is extracted from a 250\' deep well drilled into quartzite bedrock and extracted at approximately 51

Ruling:

The system as described in the CIR is a combined passive geothermal heat exchange / ground source heat pump system. Per the v2.1 Reference Guide (pages 155 and 157) these types of systems do not qualify for points under this category because they do not generate energy. In general, environmental heat sources and sinks with a low temperature difference relative to room air conditions are not considered renewable energy sources in EAc2 in LEED-NC v2.1 or v2.2. The energy saving benefits of these types of systems may be applied to EAc1 calculations. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Is it acceptable to use a mix of 10% biofuel and 90% natural gas to meet the requirements of EAc2, and is there a minimum time period for which the biofuel must be purchased from the utility company?

Ruling:

For biofuels to qualify, the bio-gas system must meet the requirements as per table 3 of EAc2 as per the LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide and a signed declaration from the provider that clearly shows the source must be provided. The intent is for a portion of the building\'s energy to come from biofuel for the duration of its existence. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/1/2014
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project team is planning on installing a Cogeneration System that will take Biogas and turn it into Electricity to be used wholly on-site. The heat produced by this Cogeneration system will also fully be used on-site to preheat heating hot water and domestic hot water via a heat exchanger and potentially to power an absorption chiller.The building will receive the Biogas from a local Biogas provider and plans to enter into at least a 10 year contract with this provider to supply enough Biogas to the building to fully power the planned Cogeneration system. The contract will stipulate both that enough Biogas will be fed into the pipeline to meet required demands of the Cogeneration system and that the Biogas will be metered to prove that the actual amount of Biogas supplied meets the contracted requirements at all times.Though the Biogas is not being piped exclusively to the site (contractually it is supplied exclusively via project ownership funds), it is transported directly to the site in the existing natural gas pipeline. This approach achieves the exact same net result on the Natural Gas grid as piping Biogas exclusively to the project site in its own dedicated pipeline and allows the project to avoid having to dig up 100s of miles of land and lay a brand new pipeline to the project, something that would have a significantly detrimental effect on the local environment. In an urban environment like where the project is located, there is little or no option to be able to refine and extract Biogas on-site or even very close to a site, so the approach the project team is suggesting is the best and most reasonable alternative.Is this approach acceptable in accordance with the Reference Guide and Addendum 100001081 (November 1, 2011)?

Ruling:

Directed Biogas purchase is not considered on-site renewable energy based on the current EAc2 credit requirements, addenda and LEED Interpretations, because the gas consumed on-site is not the same as the biogas that the project purchased. Please note that the referenced Addendum 100001081 does not allow for the fuel used on site to be different than the fuel that was purchased for the project. The referenced addendum applies for situations such as landfill gas piped directly to the project from a nearby landfill, or wood pellets from wood mill residue that are trucked to the project. In either case, it would not be acceptable for the landfill gas or pellets generated from wood mill residue to be "purchased" by the project, used in another project, and replaced in the project with natural gas or wood pellets produced from tree tops. Also, note that NREL refers to directed biogas as off-site renewable energy.

Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/19/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This is an administrative ruling posted by USGBC updating the conditions that must be met for a project to take credit for renewable energy under EAc2.

Ruling:

A previous ruling (EAc2.1 CIR Ruling 10-03-2006), defined conditions that must be met for projects to qualify for renewable energy credits under EAc2. This ruling updates the previous ruling defining alternative conditions for projects to qualify for EAc2 renewable energy credits. A project will be eligible to achieve points under EAc2 and qualify for renewable energy credits for the system under EAc1 if the project meets the following conditions: 1 The renewable energy system is installed within the boundaries of the project or on the project site. 2 The renewable energy system is connected immediately adjacent to the utility meter. 3 A 10-year (minimum) contract for on-site generation with the owner of the Energy System is established. 4 The RECs associated with the renewable energy system are not sold. 5 The Energy System owner does not count the RECs associated with the renewable energy system to meet a mandated renewable portfolio standard goal or provides the RECs to the project owner. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Are Ecoenergy labeled electricity products applicable for LEED EB O&M EA credit 4: Renewable energy?

Ruling:

Ecoenergy-labeled electricity products can qualify for EAc4 provided that equivalency with Green-e certification is demonstrated by the project team. The Green-e standard is located on their website: http://wee.green-e.org

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/4/2016
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We would like to confirm the applicability of a District Lake Source Cooling (LSC) operation as an eligible on-site renewable energy source for LEED NC 2009 and LEED v4 BD+C. This innovative Lake Source Cooling facility, which has been in operation since 2000, uses the deep cold waters of a large lake as a non-contact renewable cooling source for a campus chilled water system. At a depth of ~250ft the bottom of the lake maintains a steady year-round temperature of 39-41 F. The only energy used in the system is pumping energy and the system has demonstrated an 86% reduction in energy use over conventional water cooled chiller. Extensive environmental impact studies were carried out prior to and after operation and all have concluded that adverse environmental impacts have been minimized or avoided. It does not use any vapor compression cycle and no water is wasted.

The LEED 2009 Reference Guide states "geothermal energy systems using deep-earth water or steam sources (but not vapor compression systems for heat transfer) may be eligible for this credit." The project team proposes to account for the renewable energy credit by calculating savings between the proposed case model with LSC system and a proposed case model with conventional refrigeration system that complies with the ASHRAE 90.1 code requirements.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting whether deep-water Lake Source Cooling that replaces the refrigeration cycle for the campus central plant system may be used to claim credit for on-site renewable energy for the project under EA Credit 2: Renewable Energy Generation. The proposed approach is not acceptable since the lake source cooling does not qualify as a geothermal energy source using deep water or steam sources. Furthermore, the resource would be depleted and would have a negative environmental impact if the cooling capacity were increased exponentially (i.e. the resource provides increasingly less environmental benefit for other/subsequent projects beyond this one); therefore it is not considered on-site renewable energy.

It is noted that the proposed approach is an extremely efficient form of cooling, and while no credit is allowed as an on-site renewable source, significant credit would be achieved for EA Credit 1: Optimize Energy Performance using the ASHRAE 90.1 Appendix G modeling processes.

Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
8/21/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is installing a photovoltaic system that will be directly connected to the building\'s energy system, and which will be net-metered with the utility grid. The system is being financed through a power purchase agreement, which requires selling of the RECs to the public utility. A number of Credit Interpretation Rulings have been issued regarding the conditions which must be met for a project to qualify for renewable energy credits under EAc2. These CIRs seem to provide conflicting language. We are seeking clarification regarding these conditions for LEED-NCv2.2 and LEED-CSv2.0 projects. - CIRs dated 10/3/2006 and 5/16/2006 state that the sale of RECs is allowed from an on-site renewable energy system that claims credit under EAc2 if the building owner or energy system owner purchases a total amount of RECs equal to 200% of the system\'s annual rated energy output each year from another source, which must be Green-e eligible. Per the CIRs, the seller of the on-site RECs must also follow all established guidelines for the sale of RECs and not claim any of the environmental attributes for the on-site system. - An administrative ruling dated 7/19/2007, which updates conditions for on-site renewable systems to achieve EAc2 points, does not make reference to the purchase of 200% RECs as an acceptable method of credit achievement. - However, the same 200% REC purchase compliance path is also outlined in the new LEED 2009 BD&C Reference Guide. - A CIR dated April 15, 2009 rules that a project that hosts a PV system, which does not use the PV and/or the PV is fully financed, owned and sold to third parties, can achieve EAc2 by purchasing a total amount of RECs equal to 100% of the system\'s annual rated energy output. Please confirm that a project pursuing EAc2 under LEED-NC v2.2 (or LEED-CSv2.0) can achieve EAc2 points by utilizing the 200% REC purchase methodology as outlined in the 2006 CIRs and 2009 BD&C Reference Guide, or the 100% REC purchase methodology outlined in the 2009 CIR. We are also seeking clarification regarding the length of time for which RECs must be purchased. The 5/16/2006 CIR states that RECs must be purchased "each year." Does this mean that RECs must be purchased each year that the system\'s RECs are sold, indefinitely? Alternatively, the 10/3/2006 CIR states that RECs must be purchased for at least ten years. Please clarify if the REC purchase is required for 10 years, or for the entire length of the utility REC purchase agreement.

Ruling:

The applicant is asking for clarification on the quantity and length of time for which RECs need to be purchased in order to achieve credit for On-Site Renewable energy that is sold to the grid. Most of the various CIRs referenced by the applicant are relevant; some of these rulings appear to add confusion to the quantity of RECs that are needed. It has been determined that the project can achieve EAc2 by purchasing a total amount of RECs equal to 100% of the system\'s annual rated energy output. There must be at least a 10-year contract for the purchase of the energy output. This CIR supersedes the 200% requirement set by the CIR Ruling dated 5/16/2006. Please note this CIR only dictates the quantity of RECs and the duration and other requirements related to documentation and green-e stay valid as stated in the 5/16/2006 and other CIRs.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY (EA CREDIT 2)MULTIPLE CAMPUS SPECIAL ALLOWANCE FOR K-12 SCHOOL DISTRICTSThe following request is intended to allow K-12 school districts with multiple campuses and multiple LEED projects, to optimize the design, installation and cost of on-site renewable energy systems.It is very difficult for older school districts to find sufficient suitable land, parking areas, and structurally adequate building rooftops, on campuses in urban areas, for the installation of renewable energy systems. One campus may have suitable areas while another has no suitable areas. The intent of this LEED interpretation is to allow the one campus within a school district to serve as the on-site renewable systems location for other campuses.This request would allow districts to have renewable energy systems in one, or more, centralized areas, and would help optimize the cost and allocation of energy generated by such systems across multiple projects. A school district with multiple campuses is currently forced to located renewables energy systems within a campus boundary. Large corporations and large universities are allowed to located centralized renewable energy systems to serve multiple LEED projects that can separated far from each other. This seems like an unfair benefit intended to help the large property owners. The benefit should be extended to K-12 school districts.Although this LEED interpretation is written based on K-12 schools the USGBC may wish to extend this allowance to other LEED project types.For such an allowance to meet the intent of LEED we believe several restrictions should be applied to avoid issues related to owners of multiple properties that the USGBC might be concerned with. The USGBC should adjust and revise the restrictions below to address any issues we may have not considered such that the intent of LEED is met. A possible list of restrictions is provided below for use by the USGBC in developing criteria for this multiple-campus request.1. Multiple campus properties must all be owned by the same owner. [The USGBC may decide to allow leased properties to be included if certain criteria is met; e.g, length of lease similar to LEED-CI requirements.]2. The school district must make a commitment and register at least two projects for LEED certification.3. Each school district property claimed, either as a LEED project or renewables energy generation site, must be located in the same energy services utility district.4. The K-12 school district boundary area must be contiguous, or maximum distance encompassing the campuses of no greater than 10 miles square (10 x 10 miles). Exceptions to this requirement will be evaluated on their merits.5. All LEED School Rating systems can use this interpretation, however, specific renewable energy requirements must be met for each different rating system version.6. The energy generation generation of each separate renewable systems location can be aggregated together. This will create an overall renewable energy generation value that can then be distributed to separate projects. The energy generation of each separate renewable project location must be evaluated based on the renewable energy resources available at each specific location. For example, if the solar energy systems are used the solar energy generation must be based on the actual solar resources for a specific renewable energy source location.

Ruling:

For campus-based projects, such as schools or office complexes, where multiple campuses are under the same ownership, it is permissible to allow one campus to serve as the on-site renewable systems location for other campuses, provided the following criteria have been met:1. Multiple campus properties must all be owned by the same owner. 2. All projects pursuing credit for renewable energy using this compliance path must be registered within 5 years of the initial date of operation of the renewable energy system. 3. All campuses must be within ten miles of one another (exceptions to this requirement will be evaluated on their merits). Documentation showing boundary and owner information must be submitted with the initial project application, as well as a complete list that includes all projects submitting for LEED certification and all campus on-site renewable energy sites included within this strategy. 4. The energy generation of each separate renewable systems location can be aggregated together, creating an overall renewable energy generation value that can then be distributed to separate projects. The energy generation of each separate renewable project location must be evaluated based on the renewable energy resources available at each specific location. A letter from the owner must be submitted indicating the amount of site-generated renewable energy allocated to each project building, and verifying that the renewable energy allocated to each project will not be used for any other LEED project certifications (except EB:O&M certifications for projects certified using this methodology). Furthermore, the letter should indicate that the RECs from the installed system belong to the property owner, and have not been sold or given away. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/9/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Question: Are perforated metal wall solar air heating systems eligible for credit under LEED CS EAc2?" Background: The intent of the credit is to "encourage and recognize increasing levels of on-site renewable energy self-supply in order to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use." "Renewable Energy Systems Eligible for EA Credit 2", "Solar Thermal Systems" (p. 224) states "Active solar thermal energy systems that employ collection panels; heat transfer mechanical components such as pumps or fans, and a defined heat storage system, such as a hot water tank are eligible for this credit." "Systems Not Eligible for EA Credit 2" (p. 224) states excludes "architectural passive solar and daylighting strategies provide savings that are chiefly efficiency related". Perforated metal wall solar air heating systems include a collector panel (the wall) and a heat transfer mechanical component (fan or fans) but typically do not include a defined thermal storage component. Natural Resources Canada considers these to be active systems ("Total energy savings result from four different mechanisms: [including] active solar heating of ventilation air" http://www.canren.gc.ca/renew_ene/index.asp?CaID=50&PgID=347)

Ruling:

The perforated metal wall solar air heating system described is considered an active system and therefore can contribute toward EA Credit 2. The applicant should note that there are no previously approved calculators for the amount of energy offset by such a system and therefore, the applicant must provide detailed calculations, including all assumptions and applicable weather data, during the review process. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our Campus has a 780 kW PV system installed as a joint venture with a Utility, which was made possible by partial funding from the sale of the REC\'s. The system is installed on 10 existing random building rooftops, with another 136 kW phase nearly commissioned on/near a sports field. We pay a small kWh premium, and will take full ownership after 20 years. PV output is dedicated for campus use, utilizing a combination of direct building connections and connections to the campus owned grid. We would like to apply for EAc2 on a campus basis for approximately 9 separate building projects that do not include their own individual PV installations. The cost to buy REC\'s for 10 years for the entire campus system is prohibitive under our current construction budgets. We propose that individual LEED Building Projects apply for EAC2 using the existing onsite PV renewable source, and buy 10-year REC\'s for 100% of the power claimed on the Template, as qualifying on-site renewable energy. The project REC\'s would be redeemed and solely retained by the individual Building Projects, and would not be shared for use on any other projects. Would purchasing REC\'s then restore the "associated environmental benefit" to the on-site generated renewable project energy claimed; and meet the sustainable intent of the credit as indicated in the CIR Ruling dated 7/20/2009?

Ruling:

The CIR Ruling dated 7/20/2009 (#2616), states that if the project sold renewable energy certificates associated with the on-site renewable energy system, the team may not take credit for the system under EAc2, since the system would have no associated environmental benefit. The project teams approach of purchasing 10-year REC\'s for 100% of the power claimed on the Template, to restore the associated environmental benefit is acceptable. The project must provide sufficient documentation to ensure the portion of the on-site renewable energy system designated for each building is not used on other projects. Additionally, the project team should provide documentation, including contractual terms, to verify the purchase of the necessary volume of REC\'s. The project team may not apply any of the REC\'s purchased to restore the associated environmental benefits of the on-site renewable energy system for the purposes of achieving EAc2 towards achieving EAc6, Green Power.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/1/2014
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can the definition of renewable energy sources be modified to include all clean urban wood waste, invasive species, habitat restoration programs, clean industrial wood waste (pallets), and tree tops left over from logging operations?

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting that the definition of renewable energy sources be modified to include all clean urban wood waste, invasive species, habitat restoration programs, clean industrial wood waste (pallets), and tree tops left over from logging operations as a renewable sources of energy for this project. The wood, which the applicant claims would otherwise be diverted to a landfill or burned in piles, is collected from local municipals. The collected wood is then used by the District Energy plant, which includes a Combined Heat and Power plant that is fueled mostly by wood waste.The project may expand the definition of renewables to include tree slashings, invasive species, clean urban wood waste, habitat restoration programs, tree tops left over from logging operations and related clean wood processing with the following additional requirements:
1. The wood must be harvested within twenty-five miles of the CHP plant. Note that LEED Interpretations #2591 and #5332 both require that the project be contiguous to the location where the wood is harvested, so this ruling is considered to be less stringent than previous LEED Interpretations regarding this issue.
2. The district energy owner must either own the rights to the wood; or the district energy provider must have a ten-year contract for the rights to the wood. Note that LEED Interpretations #2591 and #5332 both require that the project team own the wood source, so this ruling is considered to be less stringent than previous LEED Interpretations regarding this issue. Evidence of ownership or a contract with the owner of the wood should be submitted as part of the LEED submittal.
3. Additional documentation should be provided to document that the wood would otherwise be diverted to landfill or directly burned.
4. Information should be provided documenting the air quality measures that will be implemented to limit the particulate and greenhouse gas emissions for the wood-burning Combined Heat and Power plant to be less than or equal to those for a coal-fired plant with similar generation and thermal energy capacities.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/15/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 238,000 SF brick manufacturing facility in Terre Haute, Indiana. The project consists of 5,000 SF of office space and 233,000 SF of manufacturing area, including extrusion, drying, and kiln equipment. The energy required for the manufacturing process exceeds 90% of the facility\'s total energy load. We are submitting a separate CIR to address quantifying energy savings for the manufacturing process. In the brick industry, the typical manufacturing process (specifically the kiln) utilizes natural gas as a primary energy source. To maximize energy savings and reduce the environmental and economic impact of brick-making, our Client has selected a site that is directly adjacent to a municipal landfill, with plans to fuel the kiln with methane off-gassing from the landfill. Currently, the methane is collected, burned, and flared directly into the atmosphere; however, it can be contained, cleaned and pressurized so that it may be used constructively in lieu of natural gas. Our Client has obtained permission from the landfill to tap into this energy source. As part of our project scope, we will install compressors and an underground pipeline to transport the landfill gas to the manufacturing facility. This will replace the majority of natural gas that powers the kiln and vastly reduce the amount of on-grid energy required by the facility. Our Client will install and maintain all equipment required to prepare, transport, and apply this methane to the manufacturing process. Other than allowing us to tap into this un-used resource, the operator of the landfill will have no involvement or responsibility in this venture. Please verify that landfill off-gassing qualifies for credit under EA credit 2 in this case, even though the landfill itself is not owned by our client or located within our project site. We will calculate renewable energy as a percentage of the total building annual energy cost, including process energy.

Ruling:

Yes, the system described meets the requirements needed to achieve credit under EAc2, despite the fact that the source of the energy (here, the landfill gas) is not directly on site. Because the project owner will install and maintain the equipment for the land fill gas extraction, and be the sole user of the gas, the renewable energy system falls under the LEED scope of the project and can effectively be considered "on-site." However, in order for this project to achieve LEED-NC v2.2 EAc2 credits, the following conditions need to be met: 1) Because the landfill gas will be used to in lieu of natural gas in a manufacturing process, the full process loads must be included in all energy cost and use estimates, whether or not the project is attempting to earn any credits under EAc1 (it is not clear from the CIR if full energy modeling will be performed for this credit). As per LEED-NC v2.2 EAc1 CIR ruling dated 5/13/2007, a full description will need to be provided of how the baseline and proposed energy usage were estimated for the project, as industrial energy usage does not fall under the purview of ASHRAE 90.1-2004. Because of the nature of this project, the EAc2 compliance path using CBECS data to estimate annual energy costs is not appropriate. 2) As per the LEED-NC v2.2 EAc2 Reference Guide language, the method used to predict the quantity of energy generated by on-site renewable systems should be clearly stated in the LEED submittal narrative... Cost savings from renewable energy systems\' shall be reported exclusive of energy costs associated with system operation (i.e., deduct energy costs of pumps, fans, and other auxiliary devices). 3) Because the landfill is on municipal property, but the gas extraction system will be privately owned by the project owner, a clear chain of custody for rights to the gas and the associated Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) needs to be documented. Based on the documentation requirements outlined in the LEED-NC v2.1 EAc2.1CIR ruling dated 10/3/2006 (which specifically addressed third party ownership of a renewable energy system) the following requirements need to be met: A. There is a minimum 10-year contract with the local municipality to secure the rights to the landfill gas that will be used in the project. B. There must be clear documentation for accounting purposes whether the purchase includes the RECs or just the landfill gas. C. If the purchase does not include the RECs, the building owner or energy system owner must make the 200% offset REC purchase described in the first portion of the CIR for at least 10 years. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

For two new buildings being constructed on a campus with an existing solar farm, is it acceptable to submit both these buildings for EAc2, provided that the total amount of energy for which credit is being sought is less than the amount produced by the farm?

Ruling:

The proposed methodology is acceptable as long as the documentation is provided verifying what percentage of the solar farm is supporting each building and as long as the projected project cost for each project is consistent with the percentage of the solar farm that would need to be installed to support that building. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/1/2014
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

To encourage increasing levels of on-site renewable energy while recognizing that facilities with high process loads may not have the physical space available to install enough renewable energy equipment to meet the current LEED point thresholds, the following path is available for buildings where more than 60% of the estimated annual proposed building energy consumption comes from non-regulated loads.

Ruling:

1. Install on-site renewable energy systems such that the estimated annual renewable energy production meets or exceeds the kWh thresholds in the table below.

OR

2. Install on-site renewable energy systems such that the percentage of building’s annual regulated load energy cost produced by the renewable energy systems meets or exceeds the thresholds shown in the table below.

To achieve points, the project must use the option above that requires the greatest amount of renewable energy.

To help ensure high process load buildings are pursuing this alternative compliance path only after optimizing their energy performance, the total points achieved for EA credit 2, On-Site Renewable Energy, cannot exceed the points achieved for EA credit 1, Optimize Energy Performance.

Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) and other environmental attributes associated with the renewable energy must be retired and cannot be sold or used to meet regulatory obligations.

EAc1 and EAc2: 1 Point - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 150,000 - % Regulated Load: 3%
EAc1 and EAc2: 2 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 450,000 - % Regulated Load: 8%
EAc1 and EAc2: 3 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 750,000 - % Regulated Load: 13%
EAc1 and EAc2: 4 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 1,050,000 - % Regulated Load: 18%
EAc1 and EAc2: 5 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 1,350,000 - % Regulated Load: 23%
EAc1 and EAc2: 6 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 1,650,000 - % Regulated Load: 28%
EAc1 and EAc2: 7 Points - Renewable Energy Production (kWh): 1,950,000 - % Regulated Load: 33%

Note: % regulated load figures calculated by dividing whole building percentage targets by 40%

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No

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Marcus Sheffer

7group / Energy Opportunities
LEED Fellow

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