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LEED v4
Homes Mid-Rise
Energy and Atmosphere
Minimum energy performance

LEED CREDIT

Mid-Rise-v4 EAp1: Minimum Energy Performance Required

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Credit language

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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To improve the building’s overall energy performance and reduce its greenhouse gas emissions.

Requirements

Meet both the whole-building energy simulation and commissioning requirements:

Whole-Building Energy Simulation

Demonstrate a 5% improvement over the baseline building performance rating. Calculate the baseline according to the building performance rating method of USGBC’s residential midrise simulation guidelines, which is based on ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010, Appendix G (with errata), or USGBC-approved equivalent standard for projects outside the United States, using a computer simulation model for the whole-building project.

Comply with the mandatory provisions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010 (with errata).

Comply with USGBC’s multifamily energy model simulation guidelines.

Include all energy consumption and energy costs associated with the building project.

Compare the design case with a baseline building that complies with Standard 90.1–2010, Appendix G (with errata but without addenda).

AND

Commissioning

Option 1. Commissioning using ENERGY STAR protocols. Meet the ENERGY STAR Qualified Multifamily High Rise Buildings Testing and Verification (T&V) Protocols.

OR

Option 2. Commissioning using Prescriptive Path.

Meet all of the following:

  1. Reduced Heating and Cooling Distribution System Losses for In-unit HVAC
    Limit the duct air leakage rate, testing for leakage to outside the unit or conducting a total duct leakage test. The tested leakage-to-outside rate must be less than 4.0 cfm25 per 100 square feet (1.2 cmm at 25 Pascals per 100 square meters) of conditioned floor area for each installed system. For units smaller than 1,200 square feet (110 square meters) tested leakage must be less than 6.0 cfm25 per 100 square feet (1.7 cmm at 25 Pascals per 100 square meters). Total duct leakage for in-unit systems must not exceed 8 cfm25 per 100 square feet (2.4 cmm at 25 Pascals per 100 square meters) of conditioned floor area. Testing is waived if the air-handler unit and all ductwork are visibly within the unit’s envelope (i.e., no ducts are hidden in walls, chases, floors, or ceilings).
  2. Fundamental Commissioning of Central HVAC Systems
    Meet the performance testing and ongoing maintenance requirements of EA Prerequisite Fundamental Commissioning and Verification of LEED v4 for New Construction for central commercial heating, cooling, water heating and ventilation systems. The requirements include the following:
    • Develop a system test procedure.
    • Verify system test execution.
    • Maintain an issues and benefits log throughout the commissioning process.
    • Document all findings and recommendations and report directly to the owner throughout the process.
    • Prepare and maintain a current facilities requirements and operations and maintenance plan documenting information necessary for efficient building operations.
  3. Construction Document Specifications
    Include the following details in construction and bid documents:
    • Elements to be sealed (construction and bid documents). List all elements identified in ASHRAE 90.1–2010, Section 5.4.3.1, or applicable state or local codes, in addition to any site-specific elements identified during plan review, and include the items in the LEED for Homes multifamily midrise thermal enclosure inspection checklist (see below). Show locations to be sealed as well as acceptable methods and materials.
    • Air barrier sheet (bid documents). Show the air barrier continuity through the various conditions of the exterior enclosure; this information can serve as an index to details.
    • Compartmentalization sheet (bid documents). Show the continuity of fire and smoke barriers around each apartment and between corridors, stairs, and common areas; this information can serve as an index to details.
  4. LEED for Homes Multifamily Midrise Thermal Enclosure Inspection Checklist
    Inspect and verify each item on the checklist. The LEED checklist is based on the ENERGY STAR for Homes, version 3 (Rev. 02) thermal enclosure rater checklist, Sections 2, 3, and 5.

Certified Passive House projects automatically meet the thermal enclosure inspection checklist requirement.  

Canada ACP - NECB

Projects in Canada may instead demonstrate a percentage improvement in the proposed building performance rating compared with the baseline according to the National Energy Code for Buildings (NECB) 2011. The same percentage cost improvement in energy performance is required to meet the Prerequisite, and the same points for cost percentage improvement in energy performance are applicable for the Credit.

The following conditions (where applicable) must be met. Note that unless otherwise noted, CanQUEST (the Canadian energy modelling software based on eQUEST that performs NECB 2011 compliance runs) does not implement many of these conditions correctly and would require corresponding modifications to the Reference case.

  1. Comply with mandatory requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2010
  2. ASHRAE 90.1-2010 mandatory requirements must be met, in addition to the performance path limitations referenced in the NECB 2011 Sections 3.4.1.2, 5.4.1.2 and 6.4.1.2. In cases where ASHRAE and the NECBC reference requirements concerning the same item, the more stringent requirement shall be adhered to.

    The following exceptions apply:

  • ASHRAE 90.1-2010 mandatory items 6.4.3.9, 9.4.1.2b, 9.4.1.4, 9.4.1.5, 9.4.3

  • Apply fenestration area convention similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
  • Maintain the same FWR (as defined by NECB, including doors) for the Reference as exists in the Proposed Design, up to the prescribed maximum. If the Proposed Design’s FWR exceeds the prescribed FWR, scale down the fenestrations in the Reference case accordingly.

  • Apply skylight area convention similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
  • Maintain the same SRR for the Reference as exists in the Proposed Design, up to the prescribed 5% maximum. If the Proposed Design’s SRR exceeds 5%, scale down the skylights in the Reference case accordingly.

  • Model proposed and reference outside air similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
  • Proposed and reference (baseline) outside air rates shall be modeled as per ASHRAE 90.1 – 2010 (G3.1.2.6).

  • Apply ASHRAE kitchen exhaust demand ventilation requirements
  • Provide for the same demand ventilation requirements as described in ASHRAE Appendix G3.1.1.d.

  • Apply ASHRAE’s chiller heat recovery requirements
  • Provide for the same chiller heat recovery requirements as applies to ASHRAE.

  • Apply supply air temperature reset controlled based on warmest zone
  • Reset the minimum supply air temperature to satisfy the cooling requirements of the warmest zone, as stipulated in NECB Section 5.2.8.8. Note that this control setting is already corrected in CanQUEST for the Reference case.

  • Account for uninsulated structural penetrations if they exceed 2% of net wall area
  • The 2% allowance may be applied, but based on the net opaque wall area, not the entire building envelope area.

  • Follow ASHRAE/LEED rules for renovations to existing buildings
  • Model existing components consistent with ASHRAE and LEED provisions.

  • Account for all anticipated energy use in building
  • Fully account for all energy end-uses in the energy performance modelling.

  • DES Systems are to be modeled according to Option 1, Path 1 or Option 1, Path 2 as indicated in the LEED v4 Reference Guide
  • The following exceptions apply:

    • Option 1, Path 1 - Do not apply ASHRAE 90.1-2010 requirements for purchased heating and cooling. Under this ACP, purchased heating and cooling (as applicable) are modeled as cost-neutral in the baseline and proposed case. Local rates for purchased heating (fossil fuel based) and cooling are used to establish the purchased heating and cooling costs. The energy model's scope accounts for only downstream equipment, plus purchased heating and cooling. NECB clause 8.4.3.6 does not apply for LEED projects.
    • Model baseline systems in accordance with NECB requirements, with DX coils replaced with chilled water coils if purchased cooling is present and fossil-fired furnaces replaced with hot water coils if purchased heating is present.
    • Option 1, Path 2: Do not apply ASHRAE 90.1-2010 requirements for baseline systems. Model baseline systems in accordance with NECB requirements for onsite generated equipment (i.e. assume building is not connected to a DES and the proposed building is modeled with a virtual plant according to LEED v4 Reference Guide requirements).
    See all forum discussions about this credit »

    What does it cost?

    Cost estimates for this credit

    On each BD+C v4 credit, LEEDuser offers the wisdom of a team of architects, engineers, cost estimators, and LEED experts with hundreds of LEED projects between then. They analyzed the sustainable design strategies associated with each LEED credit, but also to assign actual costs to those strategies.

    Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

    This information is also available in a full PDF download in The Cost of LEED v4 report.

    Learn more about The Cost of LEED v4 »

    Addenda

    10/14/2019Updated: 10/14/2019
    Regional ACP
    Description of change:
    Refer to attached resource to view the Energy & Atmosphere Alternative Compliance Paths for Canada Projects,
    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    No
    7/25/2019Updated: 7/30/2019
    Rating System Correction
    Description of change:
    Replace sentence "Comply with USGBC’s residential midrise simulation guidelines." with the following:

    "Comply with USGBC’s multifamily energy model simulation guidelines. "
    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    No
    1/27/2017Updated: 7/30/2019
    Reference Guide Correction
    Description of change:
    CORRECTION #1 OF 3:
    In the Residential Simulation Modeling Guidelines Table 2.3.1, Baseline design column, HVAC section: replace the two paragraphs in this box that begin with "Residential-associated spaces" with the following:"Residential-associated spaces (i.e. corridors, stairwells, lobbies, amenity spaces, and other spaces that primarily serve the residents) may be considered non-residential area OR residential area when determining applicability for that do not meet Exception (a) or Exception (e) of Section G3.1.1 Exception (a). If the total non-residential area is less than 20,000 square feet, the non-residential spaces shall be modeled with the same HVAC system type (System 1 or 2) as the in-unit spaces.
    If classified as a residential space, Residential-associated spaces that have a different heating source than the in-unit spaces exceeding 20,000 square feet or building area perand satisfy Exception (a) of Section G3.1.1 shall be modeled with the appropriate residential system type (System 1 or 2), per Table G3.1.1A."
    CORRECTION #2 OF 3:
    In the Residential Simulation Modeling Guidelines Table 2.3.1, Baseline design column, Ventilation & Infiltration section: At the end of the sentence "The baseline design mechanical ventilation rate shall be modeled as equal to the rates allowed by ASHRAE 62.2 (in dwelling units) or 62.1 (outside dwelling units)", add the following text: ",or the applicable local codes, whichever is more stringent. "
    CORRECTION #3 OF 3:
    In the "Exceptional Calculations required for residential projects" section: delete the last bullet that begins with "Demand-controlled garage ventilation..."

    **July 25, 2019 update:

    Multifamily Energy Model Simulation Guidelines
    Replace "35 degrees F" for system type 2 with "25 degrees F".
    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    7/2/2018Updated: 7/6/2018
    Reference Guide Correction
    Description of change:
    Further Explanation: Insert the following content as the third section in Further Explanation, between current sections "Prescriptive Path" and "Creating a Compliant 90.1 Energy Model":

    "Fundamental Commissioning of Central HVAC and Service Water Heating Systems

    Engage a commissioning authority (CxA) with the following qualifications:
    • The CxA must have documented commissioning process experience on at least two building projects with a similar scope of work.
    • The CxA may be a qualified employee of the owner, an independent consultant, or an employee of the design or construction firm who is not part of the project’s design or construction team, or a disinterested subcontractor of the design or construction team
    • For project types meeting all of the following criteria, the CxA may be a qualified member of the design or construction team, but the designated CxA must report all findings directly to the owner.
    o Projects where the central systems serving residential spaces are limited to service water heating, fresh air systems, central exhaust air systems, and/or pumps and heat exchangers used in conjunction with District Energy Systems (where the heating and cooling are generated upstream of the building)
    o Projects where the total commercial gross area does not exceed 20,000 square feet (commercial area refers to office, retail, hospitality, or similar occupancy, but does not refer to common residential areas such as corridors, lobbies, fitness areas, etc. used to support the residential functions of the building)

    Meet the performance testing and ongoing maintenance requirements of EA Prerequisite Fundamental Commissioning and Verification of LEED v4 for New Construction for central commercial heating, cooling, water heating and ventilation systems. The requirements include the following:
    • Develop a system test procedure.
    • Verify system test execution.
    • Maintain an issues and benefits log throughout the commissioning process.
    • Document all findings and recommendations and report directly to the owner throughout the process.
    • Prepare or oversee preparation of a current facilities requirements and operations and maintenance plan documenting information necessary for efficient building operations.

    Systems that must be included in the commissioning scope of work include:
    • Central HVAC systems serving residential spaces including but not limited to:
    o Chillers
    o Boilers
    o Pumps
    o Cooling towers
    o Heat exchangers
    o Ground source loops
    o Variable refrigerant flow shared outdoor units, and the associated refrigerant lines
    o Air handling units
    o Fresh air systems
    o Central exhaust systems
    o Building automation system HVAC controls
    • Central service water heating systems serving residential spaces
    • Garage exhaust and/or heating systems
    • Snow melt systems
    • HVAC and service water heating systems and pool heating serving common areas and commercial areas
    o Exception, commissioning of common and commercial areas is not required if the combined capacity of HVAC and service water equipment serving common areas and commercial areas is less than 20 tons cooling, 500,000 btuh heating, or 10,000 cfm

    The CxA should be engaged as early as possible in the design phase, and must be engaged no later than the completion of contract documents. Functional testing for all systems in the commissioning scope of work must commence before the completion of the construction phase."


    Further Explanation: Insert the following content as the fourth section in Further Explanation, after the new section "Fundamental Commissioning of Central HVAC and Service Water Heating Systems" and before the section "Creating a Compliant 90.1 Energy Model":

    "Functional Performance Tests

    The functional performance test reports typically have the following sections:
    • Date and time of test
    • Individuals present during testing
    • Visual inspection observations. Before testing, the CxA should perform a visual inspection and document any issues or relevant observations.
    • Sensor checks. The sensors are checked individually to make sure they are reading properly and are in the correct locations, per the design documents.
    • Device checks. Each device is checked to verify that it can open, close, modulate, start, stop, energize in stages, etc.
    • Operating mode tests. A system is run through each type of operating mode including but not limited to start up, shutdown, capacity modulation, emergency and failure modes, alarm scenarios, occupied mode and unoccupied mode, and interlocks with other equipment.
    • Results. Indicate whether the system passed, failed, or requires retesting."


    Technical Resources: Add the following resource at the end of this section:
    "Functional Test Guide: http://www.ftguide.org/ftct/testdir.htm"


    Definitions: Add the following term and definition as the first term in this section:
    "Central HVAC System: HVAC or water heating systems, or components of those systems that serve multiple residential units, common areas, or commercial spaces."


    Verification and Submittals: In the section "Supporting verification materials, made available by the project team" add the following additional items in a bulleted list beneath the Multifamily Midrise bullet "Provide energy model for USGBC review.":

    • Name of Commissioning Provider
    • Commissioning Report with date of completion
    • List of Systems Commissioned
    • Full issues summary log
    • Number of equipment functional tests performed
    • At least 2 sample function tests (for two different system types)
    • Date of Acceptance by Owner
    • Expected completion date of Commissioning Report (usually one year after Owner’s acceptance)

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    7/1/2014Updated: 3/29/2018
    Regional ACP
    Description of change:
    Add the following as a USGBC-approved equivalent standard for projects outside the U.S.

    "Projects in Canada may instead demonstrate a percentage improvement in the proposed building performance rating compared with the baseline according to the National Energy Code for Buildings (NECB) 2011. The same percentage improvement in energy performance is required to meet the Prerequisite, and the same points for percentage improvement in energy performance are applicable for the Credit.

    The following conditions (where applicable) must be met. Note that unless otherwise noted, CanQUEST (the Canadian energy modelling software based on eQUEST that performs NECB 2011 compliance runs) does not implement these conditions correctly and would require corresponding modifications to the Reference case.

    1. Comply with mandatory requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2010
    ASHRAE 90.1-2010 mandatory requirements must be met, in addition to the performance path limitations referenced in the NECB 2011 Sections 3.4.1.2, 5.4.1.2 and 6.4.1.2. In cases where ASHRAE and the NECBC reference requirements concerning the same item, the more stringent requirement shall be adhered to.

    2. Apply fenestration area convention similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
    Maintain the same FWR (as defined by NECB, including doors) for the Reference as exists in the Proposed Design, up to the prescribed maximum. If the Proposed Design’s FWR exceeds the prescribed FWR, scale down the fenestrations in the Reference case accordingly.

    3. Apply skylight area convention similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
    Maintain the same SRR for the Reference as exists in the Proposed Design, up to the prescribed 5% maximum. If the Proposed Design’s SRR exceeds 5%, scale down the skylights in the Reference case accordingly.

    4. Model proposed and reference outside air similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
    Proposed and reference (baseline) outside air rates shall be modelled as per ASHRAE 90.1 – 2010 (G3.1.2.6).

    5. Apply ASHRAE kitchen exhaust demand ventilation requirements
    Provide for the same demand ventilation requirements as described in ASHRAE Appendix G3.1.1.d.

    6. Apply ASHRAE’s chiller heat recovery requirements
    Provide for the same chiller heat recovery requirements as applies to ASHRAE.

    7. Apply supply air temperature reset controlled based on warmest zone
    Reset the minimum supply air temperature to satisfy the cooling requirements of the warmest zone, as stipulated in NECB Section 5.2.8.8. Note that this control setting is already corrected in CanQUEST for the Reference case.

    8. Account for uninsulated structural penetrations if they exceed 2% of net wall area
    The 2% allowance may be applied, but based on the net opaque wall area, not the entire building envelope area.

    9. Follow ASHRAE/LEED rules for renovations to existing buildings
    Model existing components consistent with ASHRAE and LEED provisions.

    10. Account for all anticipated energy use in building
    Fully account for all energy end-uses in the energy performance modeling."
    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    10/2/2017Updated: 10/20/2017
    Rating System Correction
    Description of change:
    Remove 9 instances of references to qualified energy rater in LEED v4 Homes and Midrise rating system requirements, as indicated below.

    (Instances 1 and 2) EA PREREQUISITE: MINIMUM ENERGY PERFORMANCE (MIDRISE), Option 2. Commissioning using Prescriptive Path:

    Requirement 1. Reduced Heating and Cooling Distribution System Losses for In-unit HVAC: remove the phrase "verified by a qualified energy rater." at the end of the second sentence under 1.
    Requirement 4. Multifamily Midrise Thermal Enclosure Inspection Checklist: replace the first sentence under 2 with the following text: "Inspect and verify each item on the checklist."

    (Instance 3 & 4 ) EA CREDIT: AIR INFILTRATION (HOMES): Delete sentence in both Case 1 and Case 2 "The rate of air leakage to outside must be tested and verified by a qualified energy rater" from credit language.

    Instance 5) EA CREDIT: ENVELOPE INSULATION (HOMES): Delete sentence "Installation must be verified by a qualified energy rater conducting a pre-drywall thermal enclosure inspection" from credit language.

    (Instance 6 and 7) EA CREDIT: HEATING AND COOLING DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    Option 2. Ductwork in Unconditioned Space: Delete the phrase ", verified by the qualified energy rater." after the sentence that begins with "for each installed system" under requirements for both Large Homes or Multifamily Units and under requirements for Small Homes or Multifamily Units.

    (Instances 8 and 9) EQ CREDIT: BALANCING HEATING AND COOLING DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    Option 2. Supply Air-Flow Testing: Delete the phrase "by a qualified energy rater" from the sentence that begins "Have the total supply air-flow rates in each room tested ."

    Option 3. Pressure Balancing: Delete the sentence "The testing must be verified by a qualified energy rater."



    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    9/13/2016Updated: 11/15/2016
    Form Update
    Description of change:
    (calculator dated 8/23/2016, published 9/13/2016)
    • Baseline System Helpful Notes Section has been updated in the Water-Side HVAC tab
    • District energy system (DES) Path 3 calculations have been revised
    • Optional notes column has been added to each tab for project teams to provide further clarification
    • Exceptional calculation formulas have been revised
    • Performance upgrade to the General Information tab has been implemented
    • Baseline case fan power formulas have been updated
    • Lighting table language has been updated (v2009)
    • Exterior lighting quality assurance (QA) checks have been updated
    • Further guidance has been provided for determining unitary cooling efficiency in the Helpful Notes section of the Air-Side HVAC tab
    • Performance Outputs tab formulas have been revised to be more robust for multiple building projects
    • Summary tab formulas have been revised to reference total cost savings with and without renewable energy contribution
    • Receptacle Equipment Modeling Method tables have been revised to be more robust for multiple building projects
    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    No
    1/1/2015Updated: 8/24/2016
    Reference Guide Correction
    Description of change:
    Under "Step 2. Create Energy Model" replace all instances of "USGBC's Multifamily Midrise simulation guidelines" with "USGBC’s Multifamily Energy Modeling Guidance"/n/n

    Under "Exceptional Calculation Method" section, after "Element that cannot be simulated by modeling program” paragraph add the following sections: "Exceptional Calculations Required for Residential Projects" and "Typical Exceptional Calculations." After “Ashrae 90.1, 2010 Versus 2007” section add the following new section: "Multifamily Energy Modeling Guidance." Make "Common Issues with Energy Modeling" a new primary section. /n/n

    10/1/16 addenda release: In Further Explanation Sections 'Residential Simulation Guidelines' and 'Exceptional Calculations Required for Residential Projects', replace any references to “Appendix B, Section B.1, B.2, and B.3” with "See Section: Typical Exceptional Calculations”. References to “Appendix B, Section B.1, B.2, and B.3” occur on the following pages in the pdf reference guide:

    - pg. 175: Exceptional Calculations Required for Residential Projects
    - pg. 185: Table 4: Domestic Hot Water section; Receptacles & Other Plug Loads section
    - page 186: Quality Control
    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    1/4/2016
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    Where the local code does not require vestibules or allows alternatives, can the project team take a penalty for not including vestibules in the design model?

    Ruling:

    Yes, in locations where the local code does not require vestibules or revolving doors the project team may choose one of the two options below. Additionally, all projects using this method must provide a narrative explaining how infiltration and exfiltration of air through building entries is addressed in the design.

    1. Manual subtraction of the energy cost savings associated with vestibules as conservatively estimated by PNNL-20026 “Energy Saving Impact of ASHRAE 90.1 Vestibule Requirements: Modeling of Air Infiltration through Door Openings”. Refer to the Related Resource “Default Deduction for Vestibules” for the specific percentage subtraction required based on project type and climate zone.
    2. Provide detailed exceptional calculation method calculations with each step of the calculation clearly described and in alignment with the analysis performed in PNNL-20026, but specific to the project building. Document the additional energy consumption of the project building associated with removing the vestibules from the project. No credit will be given for the use of air curtains when using this approach. A sensitivity analysis related to the number of occupants entering on an hourly basis would need to be justified. The narrative would also need to justify that the simulation software is capable of addressing the conditions required for the calculation. (Software with a well-mixed air assumption would not be able to apply this modeling approach).

    ***Update 11/9/20: This ruling is now applicable to LEED v4.1 BD+C and ID+C projects.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    11/2/2009
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    Can 4- or 5-story multi-family buildings use the low-rise Rating System and the HERS Index?

    Ruling:

    **Update April 2019:
    "This LEED Interpretation is no longer applicable and is superseded by Rating System Selection guidance."

    ________________________________________________________________
    For 4-5 story projects that meet all of the following criteria, the decision of whether to use LEED for Homes or LEED for Homes Mid-Rise is at the discretion of the project team, Green Rater and Provider: (1) the project is 5 stories or fewer; (2) the project has individual heating, cooling and water heating for each unit; and (3) the building includes no more than 20% residential-associated spaces (i.e. common spaces that serve the occupants). Providers are advised to disallow these projects from using the low-rise Rating System if they believe that the project has certain qualities (e.g. large common space loads, high ceilings and large stack effect) that are poorly reflected in the HERS Index and associated modeling tools.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    No
    7/1/2014
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    Are Manual J (or equivalent calculations) required for Multifamily Midrise projects?

    Ruling:

    Yes, all Multifamily Midrise projects are required to complete load calculation (using Manual J, 2009 ASHRAE, or equivalent) for the building. A calculation is required for each unit, although similar units may use the same load calculation.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    7/25/2019
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    Our multifamily project is pursuing ENERGY STAR Multifamily New Construction Certification (Version 1, 1.1, OR-WA 1.2). Can this be used in lieu of ASHRAE 90.1-2010 (or approved equivalent standard) to demonstrate energy performance for the project?

    Ruling:

    Projects that certify to ENERGY STAR Multifamily New Construction Certification under version 1 are considered equivalent to a 5% improvement beyond ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Appendix G. Projects that certify under version 1.1 and 1.2 are considered equivalent to a 15% improvement beyond ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Appendix G. The Home Size Adjuster shall not be used to adjust the number of points awarded when using this ENERGY STAR MFNC equivalency path.

    Projects 4 or more stories achieving ENERGY STAR Multifamily New Construction Certification Version 1, 1.1, or 1.2, where the combined retail or commercial space is less than 20% of the conditioned floor, area may follow the LEED BD+C: Homes Annual Energy Use requirements to document up to 29 points (where ERI replaces instances of HERS). The Home Size Adjuster shall not be used to adjust the number of points awarded when using this path.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    10/1/2014
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    How are small HVAC types that serve multiple dwelling units defined for the purpose of testing and commissioning systems and rating system selection?

    (Note: The LEED for Homes Rating System selection guidance allows multifamily projects that are 4 and 5 stories to use LEED for Homes (low-rise) if they have greater than 80% in-unit space, and all HVAC systems are non-central.)

    Ruling:

    USGBC considers the following systems to be non-central:

    1) Multi- split heat pumps where one condenser serves evaporator-air handlers in different units;
    2) Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) systems with a common loop but heat-pumps in each unit.

    If a building with these systems uses Homes low-rise, all energy associated with the HVAC system must be included in unit-by-unit modeling. This may require outside calculations to distribute ground source loop pump or shared condenser energy among apartments.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    7/25/2019
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    Can visual verification be conducted in lieu of duct leakage testing for Mid-rise projects for ducts that are wholly contained in the compartmentalization boundary, or for ducts that serve more than one unit? For ducts that are within conditioned space, any conditioned air escaping from the ducts would remain within the compartmentalized boundary, and would not significantly increase heating or cooling energy consumption.

    Ruling:

    Yes, for ducted heating and cooling systems that have no duct runs outside of the ‘compartmentalization boundary’ or for ducted heating and cooling systems serving more than one unit, the qualified professional must visually verify that all ducts are fully air sealed and that duct boots are sealed to the drywall in accordance with design requirements.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    No
    7/1/2015
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    For projects located in California, can the 2013 Title 24 Part 6 California Energy Code be used to demonstrate compliance in lieu of ASHRAE 90.1-2010?

    Ruling:

    Instead of ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Appendix G, projects in California may demonstrate compliance with the 2013 Title 24 Part 6 California Energy Code using the Performance method. The same percentage improvement in energy performance is required to meet the Prerequisite, and the same points for percentage improvement in energy performance are applicable for the Credit.
    The following conditions (where applicable) must be met:
    • Energy Cost shall be used as the performance metric rather than TDV energy. Exception: A Pilot ACP allowing alternate metrics may be applied as applicable.
    • Model all process energy consumption within and associated with the building as designed. Model all enclosed building spaces within and associated with the building even if the space types are not regulated by Title-24.
    • BD+C: Major renovations must be modeled using the Title-24 new construction modeling requirements for HVAC, DHW, and lighting (as opposed to existing conditions). However, for LEED-BD&C, the baseline envelope conditions may be modeled using existing conditions prior to renovation.
    • ID+C: The energy model must be modeled using the Title-24 new construction requirements for HVAC, DHW, lighting and envelope.

    Campus Applicable
    Yes
    Internationally Applicable:
    No
    7/1/2016
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    There are few professionals who are trained to perform envelope leakage, compartmentalization, and duct leakage tests in residential projects outside of North America. Is there another approach that projects can take to demonstrate compliance?

    Ruling:

    Yes, projects outside of the U.S. and Canada may perform a visual inspection of the air sealing measures in lieu of performing envelope leakage, compartmentalization, and duct leakage testing.

    The visual inspection must be performed by a qualified professional and demonstrate that each unit meets the requirements of the ENERGY STAR Thermal Enclosure Checklist (for Homes projects) or Multifamily Midrise Thermal Enclosure Checklist (for Midrise). Each item on the checklist must be documented with photo evidence. For multifamily units, all common walls, ceilings, and floors must be considered 'unconditioned spaces' when completing Section 5 - Air Sealing, of the checklist. Note that this visual inspection requires an insulation inspection site visit at a mid-construction phase, in addition to a final site visit when construction is complete.

    If this approach is used, energy savings for tight construction cannot be claimed. This approach is not available for related credits such as EA credit Air infiltration and EQ credit Enhanced compartmentalization.

    ***Updated 7.10.2020 to include applicability to v2008***

    ***Updated 11.9.2020 to include additional detail regarding required site visits***

    **Updated 1.08.2021 to align terminology with "qualified professional". For projects outside of the U.S. and Canada, the qualified professional meeting the qualifications above may perform all tasks required to be performed by the HERS Rater (also referred to as the “qualified energy rater” in the LEED v4 Homes Reference Guide).

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    4/2/2014
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    Clarification is requested regarding whether garage demand control ventilation may be modeled for credit. Garage Ventilation is not addressed by ASHRAE 90.1 – 2007, Appendix G, therefore if savings is claimed it must be modeled as an Exceptional Calculation Measure (ECM). Garage demand control ventilation is increasingly becoming standard practice in newly constructed buildings. In order to take credit for this measure as an ECM, it must be demonstrated that the proposed design goes beyond standard practice.

    Ruling:

    ECMs must be approved by the Rating Authority. As the Rating Authority for LEED projects, the GBCI will accept an ECM for garage demand control ventilation under the following circumstances:
    1) Baseline case shall meet the requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2010, Section 6.4.3.4.5 Enclosed Parking Garage Ventilation. Baseline fan volume shall be based on the minimum required ASHRAE 62.1 parking ventilation rates of 0.75 cfm / square foot. Baseline system fan power shall be calculated at 0.3 watts per CFM.

    2) Proposed case shall reflect the actual design. Evidence shall be provided documenting that demand control ventilation strategies are sufficient to automatically detect contaminant levels of concern in parking garages (for example, Carbon Monoxide, Particulates, VOCs, etc. and NO2) and modulate airflow such that contaminant levels are maintained below specified contaminant concentration as identified in ASHRAE 62.1-2010 Addendum d. Evidence shall also be provided that contaminant sensors are placed in space in an appropriate manner for detection of contaminant in question, included in the building commissioning plan upon installation, and then calibrated yearly following installation.

    The contaminants of concern that must be monitored may be limited to CO if a narrative is provided justifying how the controls will also help to limit NO2, VOCs and PM2.5 concentrations. The narrative should address how the parking garage minimum exhaust flow rate and/or the minimum fan run time (if applicable) are maintained, and provide clarification that other contaminant levels are expected to remain low based on that design. Note that NO2 would also be expected to be monitored in garages where more than 20% of the vehicles are anticipated to be diesel-fueled.

    Note: though it does not need to be addressed specifically in the narrative, the project team must confirm compliance of all ASHRAE 62.1 mandatory measures, including the measure addressing “Buildings with Attached Parking Garages” requiring limitation of vehicular exhaust into adjacent spaces. .

    3) If other activities occur in the garage area, the ventilation for these uses shall be in addition to garage vehicle ventilation.

    4) Proposed case shall be modeled such that a minimum air flow of 0.05 cfm/square foot is maintained.

    5) A narrative shall describe all Baseline and Proposed case assumptions included for this measure, and the calculation methodology used to determine the projected savings. The narrative and energy savings should be reported separately from the other efficiency measures in the LEED Form.

    6) No more than a 75% fan energy savings shall be claimed for this measure.

    UPDATED on 01/05/18 for rating system version applicability and in Section (2) to clarify that not all contaminants of concern must be continuously monitored.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    4/2/2014
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    How are minisplits addressed for the refrigerant charge test?

    Ruling:

    Minisplits are exempt from the refrigerant charge test, per EPA ENERGY STAR for Homes program notes, until a protocol is created for these systems.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    7/1/2016
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    There are very few HERS raters outside of North America. Can other professionals be considered qualified professionals?

    Ruling:

    Yes, for projects outside of the U.S. and Canada, individuals with the following qualifications will be considered a qualified professional:

    1. Completion of one of the following forms of education-

    An Associate or Bachelor’s degree program that includes coursework in applied building science. If performing blower door testing and/or duct leakage for the LEED project, the individual must provide evidence that the Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree coursework specifically covered these topics, or provide evidence of at least 4 hours of formal training for each relevant topic.

    OR

    At least 4 hours of formal training in each of the following: building science fundamentals, blower door testing (if being performed for the project), air sealing inspections, insulation inspections, and duct leakage testing (if being performed by the project).

    2. Experience performing energy inspections and testing on at least two building projects with a similar scope of work.
    3. At least three years of professional experience in residential construction.

    Additionally, the individual may not be part of the design or construction team.

    ***Updated 7.10.2020 to include applicability to v2008***

    **Updated 1.08.2021 to align terminology with "qualified professional". For projects outside of the U.S. and Canada, the qualified professional meeting the qualifications above may perform all tasks required to be performed by the HERS Rater (also referred to as the “qualified energy rater” in the LEED v4 Homes Reference Guide).

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    7/2/2018
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    Our project is subject to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for code compliance. To pursue Option 1: Whole Building Simulation, is there a methodology for documenting additional energy performance for LEED v4 projects regulated by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013?

    Ruling:

    Yes, projects applying Option 1: Whole Building Simulation, and regulated by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 may document additional energy performance improvement under LEED v4 EA credit Optimize Energy Performance as described below. The Appendix G modeling method must be used for the LEED submission, even if the Energy Cost Budget method is used to document local code compliance.

    Projects may calculate the Equivalent ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Performance improvement as:
    Equivalent performance Improvement = % better than ASHRAE 90.1-2013 + Additional Percent Savings

    Where Additional Percent Savings is shown in Table 1:

    Table 1: Additional Percent Savings for ASHRAE 90.1-2013

    Project Type1 Additional Percent Savings
    NC-Office 5%
    NC-Retail (except restaurant/grocery) 5%
    NC-School 6%
    NC-Health Care 3%
    NC-Restaurant / Grocery 3%
    NC-Hospitality 5%
    NC-Warehouse 1%
    NC-Multifamily 3%
    NC-All Other 2%
    CS-Office 3%
    CS-Retail (except restaurant/grocery) 3%
    CS-School 6%
    CS-Health Care 1%
    CS-Restaurant / Grocery 2%
    CS-Hospitality 3%
    CS-Warehouse 0%
    CS-Multifamily 1%
    CS-All Other 1%
    CI-Office 3%
    CI-Retail (except restaurant/grocery) 4%
    CI-School 6%
    CI-Health Care 2%
    CI-Restaurant / Grocery 3%
    CI-Hospitality 4%
    CI-Warehouse 0%
    CI-Multifamily 1%
    CI-All Other 2%

    1 Mixed use buildings shall use the weighted average Additional Percent Savings based on the gross enclosed floor area associated with each building type. Unfinished spaces not submitted in the CS rating system shall use the CS values. Data center space must always be considered “All Other”.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    No
    7/1/2014
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    When can load sizing calculations be reused on different units?

    Ruling:

    Requiring every unique iteration of units to have a separate Manual J is burdensome, especially considering the small heating and cooling loads in many multifamily units, and large relative HVAC equipment size. Response: The HVAC designer can use their professional experience when performing load calculations on similar units. A unique Manual J (or equivalent calculation) must be performed on any unit that is expected to have a load difference of at least 25% from other units (based on different sizes or energy efficiency measures), or the next equipment size up, whichever is smaller. Separate calculations must be performed for each similarly sized group of units that have unique orientation and exposure.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    7/2/2018
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    Our project is located in California. To pursue Option 1: Whole Building Simulation, is there a methodology for documenting additional energy performance for LEED v4 projects regulated by Title 24-2016?

    Ruling:

    Project Type1
    Additional Percent Savings

    NC-Office
    7%

    NC-Retail (except restaurant/grocery)
    8%

    NC-School
    7%

    NC-Health Care
    0%

    NC-Restaurant/Grocery
    0%

    NC-Hospitality
    8%

    NC-Warehouse
    0%

    NC-Multifamily
    8%

    NC-All Other
    0%

    CS-Office
    5%

    CS-Retail (except restaurant/grocery)
    7%

    CS-School
    5%

    CS-Health Care
    0%

    CS-Restaurant/Grocery
    0%

    CS-Hospitality
    7%

    CS-Warehouse
    0%

    CS-Multifamily
    7%

    CS-All Other
    0%

    CI-Office
    6%

    CI-Retail (except restaurant/grocery)
    7%

    CI-School
    6%

    CI-Health Care
    0%

    CI-Restaurant/Grocery
    0%

    CI-Hospitality
    7%

    CI-Warehouse
    0%

    CI-Multifamily
    7%

    CI-All Other
    0%

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    No
    10/1/2014
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    How are variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems addressed for the refrigerant charge test?

    Ruling:

    VRF systems are exempt from the refrigerant charge test, per EPA ENERGY STAR for Homes program notes, until a protocol is created for these systems.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    1/10/2020
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    Our project is located in California and subject to compliance with Title 24 2019. Title 24 2019 has requirements for lighting power density more stringent than those requirements in ASHRAE 90.1-2010, and unfinished spaces in our project will be subject to the Title 24 2019 requirements.

    For LEED credit compliance, our team plans to follow ASHRAE 90.1-2010 modeling. How can we document credit for Title 24 2019 compliant lighting in unfinished spaces?

    Ruling:

    Building Type*
    Unfinished Space Lighting Power Density

    Automotive Facility
    0.70

    Convention Center
    0.80

    Courthouse
    0.80

    Dining: Bar Lounge/Leisure
    0.75

    Dining: Cafeteria/Fast Food
    0.70

    Dining: Family
    0.70

    Dormitory
    0.61

    Exercise Center
    0.70

    Fire Station
    0.71

    Gymnasium
    0.80

    Healthcare Clinic
    0.87

    Hospital
    1.05

    Hotel
    1.00

    Library
    0.95

    Manufacturing Facility
    0.90

    Motel
    0.88

    Motion Picture Theater
    0.75

    Multifamily
    0.60

    Museum
    1.06

    Office
    0.72

    Parking Garage
    0.17

    Penitentiary
    0.97

    Performing Arts Theater
    1.10

    Police Station
    0.96

    Post Office
    0.8

    Religious Building
    0.85

    Retail: Grocery
    1.05

    Retail
    1.00

    School/University
    0.72

    Sports Arena
    0.78

    Town Hall
    0.85

    Transportation
    0.60

    Warehouse
    0.55

    Workshop
    1.10

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    No
    7/8/2017
    LEED Interpretation
    Inquiry:

    ENERGY STAR for Homes and ENERGY STAR Multifamily Highrise have requirements on how to perform load calculations and then sizing heating and cooling equipment to those loads. Is our project required to follow the EPA guidance for equipment sizing requirements?

    Ruling:

    Homes and Midrise projects must follow HVAC load calculation and equipment selection sizing guidelines laid out by the EPA, specifically in the ENERGY STAR for Homes or ENERGY STAR Multifamily Highrise programs. These requirements include:

    Cooling system total capacity must be is 95- 115% of total heat gain, or next nominal size.

    Heating system total capacity must be 100-140% of total heat loss, or next nominal size.

    Parameters used in the design calculations shall reflect the unit’s actual specifications, specifically, outdoor design temperatures, orientation, number of bedrooms, conditioned floor area, window area, predominant window performance and insulation levels, infiltration rate, mechanical ventilation rate, presence of MERV6 or better filter, and indoor temperature setpoints = 70° F for heating; 75°F for cooling.

    In addition, the internal loads must be within 80% to 200% that of 2009 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, or 80% to 150% of Manual J v8. If there are uncommon internal loads, they can be added as supplemental calculations outside of these limits, but the mechanical engineer will have to support their claim for adding any these additional internal loads.

    Campus Applicable
    No
    Internationally Applicable:
    Yes
    See all forum discussions about this credit »

    Documentation toolkit

    The motherlode of cheat sheets

    LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit is loaded with calculators to help assess credit compliance, tracking spreadsheets for materials, sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions, and examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects for you to check your work against. To get your plaque, start with the right toolkit.

    USGBC logo

    © Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

    Intent

    To improve the building’s overall energy performance and reduce its greenhouse gas emissions.

    Requirements

    Meet both the whole-building energy simulation and commissioning requirements:

    Whole-Building Energy Simulation

    Demonstrate a 5% improvement over the baseline building performance rating. Calculate the baseline according to the building performance rating method of USGBC’s residential midrise simulation guidelines, which is based on ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010, Appendix G (with errata), or USGBC-approved equivalent standard for projects outside the United States, using a computer simulation model for the whole-building project.

    Comply with the mandatory provisions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1–2010 (with errata).

    Comply with USGBC’s multifamily energy model simulation guidelines.

    Include all energy consumption and energy costs associated with the building project.

    Compare the design case with a baseline building that complies with Standard 90.1–2010, Appendix G (with errata but without addenda).

    AND

    Commissioning

    Option 1. Commissioning using ENERGY STAR protocols. Meet the ENERGY STAR Qualified Multifamily High Rise Buildings Testing and Verification (T&V) Protocols.

    OR

    Option 2. Commissioning using Prescriptive Path.

    Meet all of the following:

    1. Reduced Heating and Cooling Distribution System Losses for In-unit HVAC
      Limit the duct air leakage rate, testing for leakage to outside the unit or conducting a total duct leakage test. The tested leakage-to-outside rate must be less than 4.0 cfm25 per 100 square feet (1.2 cmm at 25 Pascals per 100 square meters) of conditioned floor area for each installed system. For units smaller than 1,200 square feet (110 square meters) tested leakage must be less than 6.0 cfm25 per 100 square feet (1.7 cmm at 25 Pascals per 100 square meters). Total duct leakage for in-unit systems must not exceed 8 cfm25 per 100 square feet (2.4 cmm at 25 Pascals per 100 square meters) of conditioned floor area. Testing is waived if the air-handler unit and all ductwork are visibly within the unit’s envelope (i.e., no ducts are hidden in walls, chases, floors, or ceilings).
    2. Fundamental Commissioning of Central HVAC Systems
      Meet the performance testing and ongoing maintenance requirements of EA Prerequisite Fundamental Commissioning and Verification of LEED v4 for New Construction for central commercial heating, cooling, water heating and ventilation systems. The requirements include the following:
      • Develop a system test procedure.
      • Verify system test execution.
      • Maintain an issues and benefits log throughout the commissioning process.
      • Document all findings and recommendations and report directly to the owner throughout the process.
      • Prepare and maintain a current facilities requirements and operations and maintenance plan documenting information necessary for efficient building operations.
    3. Construction Document Specifications
      Include the following details in construction and bid documents:
      • Elements to be sealed (construction and bid documents). List all elements identified in ASHRAE 90.1–2010, Section 5.4.3.1, or applicable state or local codes, in addition to any site-specific elements identified during plan review, and include the items in the LEED for Homes multifamily midrise thermal enclosure inspection checklist (see below). Show locations to be sealed as well as acceptable methods and materials.
      • Air barrier sheet (bid documents). Show the air barrier continuity through the various conditions of the exterior enclosure; this information can serve as an index to details.
      • Compartmentalization sheet (bid documents). Show the continuity of fire and smoke barriers around each apartment and between corridors, stairs, and common areas; this information can serve as an index to details.
    4. LEED for Homes Multifamily Midrise Thermal Enclosure Inspection Checklist
      Inspect and verify each item on the checklist. The LEED checklist is based on the ENERGY STAR for Homes, version 3 (Rev. 02) thermal enclosure rater checklist, Sections 2, 3, and 5.

    Certified Passive House projects automatically meet the thermal enclosure inspection checklist requirement.  

    Canada ACP - NECB

    Projects in Canada may instead demonstrate a percentage improvement in the proposed building performance rating compared with the baseline according to the National Energy Code for Buildings (NECB) 2011. The same percentage cost improvement in energy performance is required to meet the Prerequisite, and the same points for cost percentage improvement in energy performance are applicable for the Credit.

    The following conditions (where applicable) must be met. Note that unless otherwise noted, CanQUEST (the Canadian energy modelling software based on eQUEST that performs NECB 2011 compliance runs) does not implement many of these conditions correctly and would require corresponding modifications to the Reference case.

    1. Comply with mandatory requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2010
    2. ASHRAE 90.1-2010 mandatory requirements must be met, in addition to the performance path limitations referenced in the NECB 2011 Sections 3.4.1.2, 5.4.1.2 and 6.4.1.2. In cases where ASHRAE and the NECBC reference requirements concerning the same item, the more stringent requirement shall be adhered to.

      The following exceptions apply:

    • ASHRAE 90.1-2010 mandatory items 6.4.3.9, 9.4.1.2b, 9.4.1.4, 9.4.1.5, 9.4.3

  • Apply fenestration area convention similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
  • Maintain the same FWR (as defined by NECB, including doors) for the Reference as exists in the Proposed Design, up to the prescribed maximum. If the Proposed Design’s FWR exceeds the prescribed FWR, scale down the fenestrations in the Reference case accordingly.

  • Apply skylight area convention similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
  • Maintain the same SRR for the Reference as exists in the Proposed Design, up to the prescribed 5% maximum. If the Proposed Design’s SRR exceeds 5%, scale down the skylights in the Reference case accordingly.

  • Model proposed and reference outside air similar to ASHRAE 90.1-2010
  • Proposed and reference (baseline) outside air rates shall be modeled as per ASHRAE 90.1 – 2010 (G3.1.2.6).

  • Apply ASHRAE kitchen exhaust demand ventilation requirements
  • Provide for the same demand ventilation requirements as described in ASHRAE Appendix G3.1.1.d.

  • Apply ASHRAE’s chiller heat recovery requirements
  • Provide for the same chiller heat recovery requirements as applies to ASHRAE.

  • Apply supply air temperature reset controlled based on warmest zone
  • Reset the minimum supply air temperature to satisfy the cooling requirements of the warmest zone, as stipulated in NECB Section 5.2.8.8. Note that this control setting is already corrected in CanQUEST for the Reference case.

  • Account for uninsulated structural penetrations if they exceed 2% of net wall area
  • The 2% allowance may be applied, but based on the net opaque wall area, not the entire building envelope area.

  • Follow ASHRAE/LEED rules for renovations to existing buildings
  • Model existing components consistent with ASHRAE and LEED provisions.

  • Account for all anticipated energy use in building
  • Fully account for all energy end-uses in the energy performance modelling.

  • DES Systems are to be modeled according to Option 1, Path 1 or Option 1, Path 2 as indicated in the LEED v4 Reference Guide
  • The following exceptions apply:

    • Option 1, Path 1 - Do not apply ASHRAE 90.1-2010 requirements for purchased heating and cooling. Under this ACP, purchased heating and cooling (as applicable) are modeled as cost-neutral in the baseline and proposed case. Local rates for purchased heating (fossil fuel based) and cooling are used to establish the purchased heating and cooling costs. The energy model's scope accounts for only downstream equipment, plus purchased heating and cooling. NECB clause 8.4.3.6 does not apply for LEED projects.
    • Model baseline systems in accordance with NECB requirements, with DX coils replaced with chilled water coils if purchased cooling is present and fossil-fired furnaces replaced with hot water coils if purchased heating is present.
    • Option 1, Path 2: Do not apply ASHRAE 90.1-2010 requirements for baseline systems. Model baseline systems in accordance with NECB requirements for onsite generated equipment (i.e. assume building is not connected to a DES and the proposed building is modeled with a virtual plant according to LEED v4 Reference Guide requirements).
    See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Unsubscribe from discussions about Mid-Rise-v4 EAp1