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LEED v4
Hospitality – NC
Indoor Environmental Quality

Low emitting materials

LEED CREDIT

Hospitality-NC-v4 EQc2: Low-emitting materials 1-3 points

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SPECIAL REPORT

LEEDuser expert

Deborah Lucking

AIA, LEED AP BD+C

Fentress Architects
Director of Sustainability

SPECIAL REPORT

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Requirements

This credit includes requirements for product manufacturing as well as project teams. It covers volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in the indoor air and the VOC content of materials, as well as the testing methods by which indoor VOC emissions are determined. Different materials must meet different requirements to be considered compliant for this credit. The building interior and exterior are organized in seven categories, each with different thresholds of compliance. The building interior is defined as everything within the waterproofing membrane. The building exterior is defined as everything outside and inclusive of the primary and secondary weatherproofing system, such as waterproofing membranes and air- and water-resistive barrier materials.

Option 1. Product Category Calculations

Achieve the threshold level of compliance with emissions and content standards for the number of product categories listed in Table 2.

Table 1. Thresholds of compliance with emissions and content standards for 7 categories of materials

Category

Threshold

Emissions and content  requirements

Interior paints and coatings applied on site

At least 90%, by volume, for emissions; 100% for VOC content

  • General Emissions Evaluation for paints and coatings applied to walls, floors, and ceilings
  • VOC content requirements for wet applied products

Interior adhesives and sealants applied on site (including flooring adhesive)

At least 90%, by volume, for emissions; 100% for VOC content

  • General Emissions Evaluation
  • VOC content requirements for wet applied products

Flooring

100%

General Emissions Evaluation

Composite wood

100% not covered by other categories

Composite Wood Evaluation

Ceilings, walls, thermal, and acoustic insulation

100%

  • General Emissions Evaluation
  • Healthcare, Schools only
    Additional insulation requirements

Furniture (include in calculations if part of scope of work)

At least 90%, by cost

Furniture Evaluation

Healthcare and Schools Projects only: Exterior applied products

At least 90%, by volume

Exterior Applied Products

Table 2. Points for number of compliant categories of products

Compliant categories

Points

NC, CS, NC Retail, DC, WDC, NC Hos projects without furniture

2

1

4

2

5

3

NC, CS, NC Retail, DC, WDC, NC Hos projects with furniture, CI, CI Retail, CI Hos

3

1

5

2

6

3

Schools, HC without furniture

3

1

 

5

2

6

3

Schools, HC with furniture

4

1

6

2

7

3

Option 2. Budget Calculation Method

If some products in a category do not meet the criteria, project teams may use the budget calculation method (Table 3).

Table 3. Points for percentage compliance, under budget calculation method

Percentage of total

Points

≥ 50% and < 70%

1

≥ 70% and < 90%

2

≥ 90%

3

The budget method organizes the building interior into five assemblies:

  • flooring;
  • ceilings;
  • walls;
  • thermal and acoustic insulation;
  • furniture

Include furniture in the calculations if it is part of the scope of work. Walls, ceilings, and flooring are defined as building interior products; each layer of the assembly, including paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants, must be evaluated for compliance. Insulation is tracked separately.

Determine the total percentage of compliant materials according to Equation 1.

Equation 1. Total percentage compliance

Total % compliant for projects without furniture =

(% compliant walls + % compliant ceilings + % compliant flooring + % compliant insulation)

4

Total % compliant for projects with furniture =

(% compliant walls + % compliant ceilings + % compliant flooring + % compliant insulation) + (% compliant furniture)

5
Equation 2. System percentage compliant

Flooring, walls, ceilings, insulation % compliant =

(compliant surface area of layer 1 + compliant surface area of layer 2 + compliant surface area of layer 3 + …)

X 100

total surface area of layer 1 + total surface area of layer 2 + total surface area of layer 3 + …)
Equation 3. Furniture systems compliant, using ANSI/BIFMA evaluation

% compliant for furniture =

0.5 x cost compliant with §7.6.1 of ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 + cost compliant with §7.6.2 of ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011

X 100

total furniture cost

Calculate surface area of assembly layers based on the manufacturer’s documentation for application.

If 90% of an assembly meets the criteria, the system counts as 100% compliant. If less than 50% of an assembly meets the criteria, the assembly counts as 0% compliant.

Manufacturers’ claims. Both first-party and third-party statements of product compliance must follow the guidelines in CDPH SM V1.1–2010, Section 8. Organizations that certify manufacturers’ claims must be accredited under ISO Guide 65.

Laboratory requirements. Laboratories that conduct the tests specified in this credit must be accredited under ISO/IEC 17025 for the test methods they use.

Emissions and Content Requirements

To demonstrate compliance, a product or layer must meet all of the following requirements, as applicable.

Inherently nonemitting sources. Products that are inherently nonemitting sources of VOCs (stone, ceramic, powder-coated metals, plated or anodized metal, glass, concrete, clay brick, and unfinished or untreated solid wood) are considered fully compliant without any VOC emissions testing if they do not include integral organic-based surface coatings, binders, or sealants.

General emissions evaluation. Building products must be tested and determined compliant in accordance with California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method v1.1–2010, using the applicable exposure scenario. The default scenario is the private office scenario. The manufacturer’s or third-party certification must state the exposure scenario used to determine compliance. Claims of compliance for wet-applied products must state the amount applied in mass per surface area.

Manufacturers’ claims of compliance with the above requirements must also state the range of total VOCs after 14 days (336 hours), measured as specified in the CDPH Standard Method v1.1:

  • 0.5 mg/m3 or less;
  • between 0.5 and 5.0 mg/m3; or
  • 5.0 mg/m3 or more.

Projects outside the U.S. may use products tested and deemed compliant in accordance with either (1) the CDPH standard method (2010) or (2) the German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010). Test products either with (1) the CDPH Standard Method (2010), (2) the German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010), (3) ISO 16000-3: 2010, ISO 16000-6: 2011, ISO 16000-9: 2006, ISO 16000-11:2006 either in conjunction with AgBB, or with French legislation on VOC emission class labeling, or (4) the DIBt testing method (2010). If the applied testing method does not specify testing details for a product group for which the CDPH standard method does provide details, use the specifications in the CDPH standard method. U.S. projects must follow the CDPH standard method.

Additional VOC content requirements for wet-applied products. In addition to meeting the general requirements for VOC emissions (above), on-site wet-applied products must not contain excessive levels of VOCs, for the health of the installers and other tradesworkers who are exposed to these products. To demonstrate compliance, a product or layer must meet the following requirements, as applicable. Disclosure of VOC content must be made by the manufacturer. Any testing must follow the test method specified in the applicable regulation.

  • All paints and coatings wet-applied on site must meet the applicable VOC limits of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007, Suggested Control Measure (SCM) for Architectural Coatings, or the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1113, effective June 3, 2011.
  • All adhesives and sealants wet-applied on site must meet the applicable chemical content requirements of SCAQMD Rule 1168, July 1, 2005, Adhesive and Sealant Applications, as analyzed by the methods specified in Rule 1168. The provisions of SCAQMD Rule 1168 do not apply to adhesives and sealants subject to state or federal consumer product VOC regulations.
  • For projects outside the U.S., all paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants wet-applied on site must either meet the technical requirements of the above regulations, or comply with applicable national VOC control regulations, such as the European Decopaint Directive (2004/42/EC), the Canadian VOC Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings, or the Hong Kong Air Pollution Control (VOC) Regulation.
  • If the applicable regulation requires subtraction of exempt compounds, any content of intentionally added exempt compounds larger than 1% weight by mass (total exempt compounds) must be disclosed.
  • If a product cannot reasonably be tested as specified above, testing of VOC content must comply with ASTM D2369-10; ISO 11890, part 1; ASTM D6886-03; or ISO 11890-2.
  • For projects in North America, methylene chloride and perchloroethylene may not be intentionally added in paints, coatings, adhesives, or sealants.

Composite Wood Evaluation. Composite wood, as defined by the California Air Resources Board, Airborne Toxic Measure to Reduce Formaldehyde Emissions from Composite Wood Products Regulation, must be documented to have low formaldehyde emissions that meet the California Air Resources Board ATCM for formaldehyde requirements for ultra-low-emitting formaldehyde (ULEF) resins or no added formaldehyde resins. For projects outside the U.S., composite wood must be documented not to exceed a concentration limit of 0.05 ppm of formaldehyde (0.06 mg/m2-h when expressed as emission rate) as tested following either EN-717-1:2004, following ISO 16000-3: 2010, ISO 16000-6: 2011, ISO 16000-9: 2006, ISO 16000-11:2006, or following CEN/TS 16516: 2013 either in conjunction with AgBB or with Belgian or French legislation on VOC emission class labeling.

Salvaged and reused architectural millwork more than one year old at the time of occupancy is considered compliant, provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.

Furniture evaluation. New furniture and furnishing items must be tested in accordance with ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1–2011. Comply with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 (for half credit, by cost) OR 7.6.2 (for full credit, by cost), using either the concentration modeling approach or the emissions factor approach. Model the test results using the open plan, private office, or seating scenario in ANSI/BIFMA M7.1, as appropriate. USGBC-approved equivalent testing methodologies and contaminant thresholds are also acceptable. For classroom furniture, use the standard school classroom model in CDPH Standard Method v1.1. Documentation submitted for furniture must indicate the modeling scenario used to determine compliance.

Salvaged and reused furniture more than one year old at the time of use is considered compliant, provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.

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Cost estimates for this credit

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Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

This information is also available in a full PDF download in The Cost of LEED v4 report.

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Frequently asked questions

What are the limits on the VOC budget method?

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Do products applied to the weather barrier need to comply with VOC thresholds? 

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If one part of my multicomponent wall system is not compliant, can I still get full credit?

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Our building is atypical, and the walls and ceilings are not clearly defined. How should we classify these components? 

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Is all solid wood considered inherently non-emitting? I’ve seen sources that say only solid wood flooring counts as inherently non-emitting.

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Are throw rugs subject to the credit requirements?

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If a ceramic tile receives a top coat after it is manufactured, is it exempt from the credit requirements?

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What are the adhesives and sealants to be included in the documentation?

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I'm looking for a certification that tells me if a given product will meet the LEED v4 requirements, but I don't see one in a given product area. Am I missing something?

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When products claim that they meet California Section 01350, does the product also meet LEED v4 requirements for low-emitting materials?

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In past versions of LEED, it was easy to specify VOC limits. Is the specification process the same for LEED v4?

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Addenda

4/9/2019Updated: 4/9/2019
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Add definition for hot-mopped asphalt for roofing:

"a mopping-grade oxidized asphalt as defined by NIOSH: "an oxidized asphalt used principally in the construction of built-up roofing (BUR) and some modified bitumen systems; mopping-grade asphalts are produced in four grades (Types I through IV), according to the steepness of the roof”.
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/2/2018Updated: 7/6/2018
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Delete fourth bullet that reads: "Furniture is considered part of the scope if it is installed at the time of occupancy, regardless of who specified or provided it."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/5/2016Updated: 4/24/2018
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
April 6, 2018 Update:

In Table 5, for Insulation (thermal and acoustic), revise the first sentence in the Includes column so it reads: "Includes the following, if inside the building waterproofing membrane." Revise the first sentence in the Exceptions column so it reads "Insulation on interior or exterior of HVAC ductwork and insulation on any piping may be excluded (because of lack of modeling scenarios)." Also, revise the first sentence in the Calculations column so it reads "Total area of insulation is based on installed planar areas of each insulation type."

April 5, 2016 Entry:

In Table 5, for Insulation (thermal and acoustic), revise the first sentence in the Includes column so it reads: "Includes the following, if inside the building waterproofing membrane." Also revise the first sentence in the Calculations column so it reads "Total area of insulation is based on installed planar areas of each insulation type."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/5/2018Updated: 1/11/2018
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Under Requirements, revise inherently nonemitting sources sentence to read:

Inherently nonemitting sources. Products that are inherently nonemitting sources of VOCs (stone, ceramic, powder-coated metals, plated or anodized metal, glass, concrete, clay brick, and unfinished or untreated solid wood) are considered fully compliant without any VOC emissions testing if they do not include integral organic-based surface coatings, binders, or sealants.

Under Further Explanation, Inherently nonemitting materials, revise last two sentences as follows:

For the purposes of this credit, untreated and unfinished solid wood (not engineered wood) can also be considered nonemitting even though such materials will likely emit some amount of formaldehyde naturally.


Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/5/2018Updated: 1/11/2018
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Under Requirements, revise inherently nonemitting sources sentence to read:

Inherently nonemitting sources. Products that are inherently nonemitting sources of VOCs (stone, ceramic, powder-coated metals, plated or anodized metal, glass, concrete, clay brick, and unfinished or untreated solid wood) are considered fully compliant without any VOC emissions testing if they do not include integral organic-based surface coatings, binders, or sealants.

Under Further Explanation, Inherently nonemitting materials, revise last two sentences as follows:

For the purposes of this credit, untreated and unfinished solid wood (not engineered wood) can also be considered nonemitting even though such materials will likely emit some amount of formaldehyde naturally.


Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/27/2017Updated: 2/9/2017
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In Requirements, under Furniture evaluation, revise the second sentence to read: Comply with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 (for half credit, by cost) OR 7.6.2 (for full credit, by cost), using either the concentration modeling approach or the emissions factor approach.
In Further Explanation, Table 5, Furniture and furnishings, calculations column: revise the second sentence in the third paragraph to: "Use either a concentration modeling approach or emission factor approach.", and last sentence in the fourth paragraph to "Furniture compliant with Section 7.6.1 of BIFMA e3-2011 counts for half credit, by cost and furniture compliant with Section 7.6.2 of BIFMA e3–2011 counts for full credit, by cost. Furniture compliant with both sections is eligible for full credit, by cost, not to exceed 100% of the furniture cost.”
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/27/2017Updated: 2/9/2017
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In Requirements, under Furniture evaluation, revise the second sentence to read: Comply with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 (for half credit, by cost) OR 7.6.2 (for full credit, by cost), using either the concentration modeling approach or the emissions factor approach.
In Further Explanation, Table 5, Furniture and furnishings, calculations column: revise the second sentence in the third paragraph to: "Use either a concentration modeling approach or emission factor approach.", and last sentence in the fourth paragraph to "Furniture compliant with Section 7.6.1 of BIFMA e3-2011 counts for half credit, by cost and furniture compliant with Section 7.6.2 of BIFMA e3–2011 counts for full credit, by cost. Furniture compliant with both sections is eligible for full credit, by cost, not to exceed 100% of the furniture cost.”
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/1/2015Updated: 6/16/2015
Form Update
Description of change:
Revised the Low-Emitting Materials Calculator with the following:
- Allow inherently nonemitting products for Option 1.
- Revised Option 2's Assembly Name column so that duplicate entries are allowed.
- For each emissions criteria, added an option for products that don't meet the requirements.
- Corrected and added missing allowable VOC content to SCAQMD 1113, SCAQMD 1168, CARB 2007, and Hong Kong Air Pollution Control Regulation.
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/1/2014Updated: 2/14/2015
Form Update
Description of change:
In the assumptions table, revised Canadian VOC limits and added CARB 2007 limits.
Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/14/2019
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are using credit substitution to pursue the LEED v4.1 Low-emitting materials credit for our LEED v4 project. Is it acceptable to follow the LEED v4.1 credit requirements as written but meet the earlier versions of the referenced standards, as allowed in the LEED v4 credit?

Ruling:

Yes, LEED v4 projects using the Low-emitting materials credit from LEED v4.1 via credit substitution may alternatively use the following low-emitting criteria in lieu of the LEED v4.1 requirement:

• For VOC emissions evaluation Option 1: test in accordance with CDPH v1.1-2010 and comply with the VOC limits in Table 4-1 of CDPH v1.1-2010
• For VOC emissions evaluation Option 2: test in accordance with German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010) and comply with the LCI values in German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010)
• For VOC content evaluation: SCAQMD Rule 1113, effective June 3, 2011; SCAQMD Rule 1168, July 1 2005
• For furniture emissions evaluation: Product has been tested in accordance with ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1–2011 and complies with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 or ANSI/BIFMA e3-2012, Sections 7.6.1 (for half credit, by cost) OR 7.6.2 (for full credit, by cost).

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/2/2017
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are looking for clarification on the applicability of structural engineered wood products in the LEED v4 Low-emitting materials credit. As currently written, the credit leaves LEED users wondering how to qualify engineered wood products/assemblies.

For general emissions evaluation, the scope of California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard v1.1 clearly states the standard does not apply to structural products. Therefore, it is not an appropriate test for structural wood products. Specifically, Section 1.1.4 of CDPH v1.11 reads:
“1.1.4 The Standard does not apply to structural building products, janitorial products, air fresheners, electronic air cleaners, and other electronic equipment.”

Additionally, for the composite wood evaluation, the California Air Resource Board (CARB) exempts structural wood products from their regulation. Therefore, there is no way to have documentation for these products to meet CARB ATCM for formaldehyde for ultra-low emitting formaldehyde or no added formaldehyde resins.

Please clarify how to address these products in the credit.

Ruling:

Due to the complexity of applying the VOC emissions testing per CDPH v1.1 Standard Method to structural wood products, these products are not required to meet the general emissions evaluation. Structural wood products include: structural plywood, oriented strand board, structural composite lumber, glued laminated timber, I-joists, cross-laminated timber, and finger-jointed lumber.

Structural wood products are considered compliant if they are made with moisture resistant adhesives meeting ASTM 2559, have no surface treatments with added urea-formaldehyde resins or coatings, and if they are certified according to one of the following industry standards:

Plywood: compliant in accordance with Voluntary Product Standard ‐ Structural Plywood (PS 1‐09), Voluntary Product Standard – Performance Standard for Wood‐Based Structural‐Use Panels (PS 2‐10), or one of the standards considered by CARB to be equivalent to PS 1 or PS 2: (AS/NZS 2269, EN 636 3S (including CE label), Canadian Standards Association CSA O121 for Douglas fir plywood, CSA O151 for Canadian softwood plywood, for CSA O153 Poplar plywood, or CSAO325 for Construction sheathing)
Oriented strand board: specified with the Exposure 1 or Exterior bond classification in accordance with Voluntary Product Standard – Performance Standard for Wood‐Based Structural‐Use Panels (PS 2‐10)
Structural composite lumber: compliant in accordance with Standard Specification for Evaluation of Structural Composite Lumber Products (ASTM D 5456‐13)
Glued laminated timber: compliant in accordance with Structural Glued Laminated Timber (ANSI A190.1‐2012)
I‐joists: compliant in accordance with Standard Specification for Establishing and Monitoring Structural Capacities of Prefabricated Wood I‐Joists (ASTM D 5055‐13)
Cross‐laminated timber: compliant in accordance with Standard for Performance‐Rated Cross‐Laminated Timber (PRG 320‐15)
Finger‐jointed lumber: labeled “Heat Resistant Adhesive (HRA)” in accordance with the American Softwood Lumber Standard (DOC PS‐20 2015)

***LI updated on 4/9/21 as follows:***
Due to the complexity of applying the VOC emissions testing per CDPH v1.1 Standard Method to structural wood products, these products are not required to meet the general emissions evaluation.  Structural wood products include: structural plywood, oriented strand board, structural composite lumber, glued laminated timber, I-joists, cross-laminated timber, and finger-jointed lumber.
 
Structural wood products are considered compliant if they are certified according to one of the following industry standards:

Wood structural panel manufactured according to PS 1-09 or PS 2-10 (or one of the standards considered by CARB to be equivalent to PS 1 or PS 2) and labeled bond classification Exposure 1 or Exterior
Structural wood product manufactured according to ASTM D 5456 (for structural composite lumber), ANSI A190.1 (for glued laminated timber), ASTM D 5055 (for I-joists), ANSI PRG 320 (for cross-laminated timber), or PS 20-15 (for finger-jointed lumber).
Projects in Canada may instead use wood structural panels and structural wood products manufactured according to one of the following Exposure 1 or Exterior standards.  CSA O121 for Douglas fir plywood, Canadian Standards Association, CSA O151 for Canadian softwood plywood, CSA O153 Poplar plywood, CSA O325 for Construction sheathing)
Projects in Australia may instead use AS/NZS 2269, Plywood-Structural, Standards Australia
Projects in Europe may instead use wood structural panels and structural wood products manufactured according to EN 636 3S, Plywood-Specifications, European Committee for Standardization (CEN).

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/2/2017
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are looking for clarification on the applicability of structural engineered wood products in the LEED v4 Low-emitting materials credit. As currently written, the credit leaves LEED users wondering how to qualify engineered wood products/assemblies.

For general emissions evaluation, the scope of California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard v1.1 clearly states the standard does not apply to structural products. Therefore, it is not an appropriate test for structural wood products. Specifically, Section 1.1.4 of CDPH v1.11 reads:
“1.1.4 The Standard does not apply to structural building products, janitorial products, air fresheners, electronic air cleaners, and other electronic equipment.”

Additionally, for the composite wood evaluation, the California Air Resource Board (CARB) exempts structural wood products from their regulation. Therefore, there is no way to have documentation for these products to meet CARB ATCM for formaldehyde for ultra-low emitting formaldehyde or no added formaldehyde resins.

Please clarify how to address these products in the credit.

Ruling:

Due to the complexity of applying the VOC emissions testing per CDPH v1.1 Standard Method to structural wood products, these products are not required to meet the general emissions evaluation. Structural wood products include: structural plywood, oriented strand board, structural composite lumber, glued laminated timber, I-joists, cross-laminated timber, and finger-jointed lumber.

Structural wood products are considered compliant if they are made with moisture resistant adhesives meeting ASTM 2559, have no surface treatments with added urea-formaldehyde resins or coatings, and if they are certified according to one of the following industry standards:

Plywood: compliant in accordance with Voluntary Product Standard ‐ Structural Plywood (PS 1‐09), Voluntary Product Standard – Performance Standard for Wood‐Based Structural‐Use Panels (PS 2‐10), or one of the standards considered by CARB to be equivalent to PS 1 or PS 2: (AS/NZS 2269, EN 636 3S (including CE label), Canadian Standards Association CSA O121 for Douglas fir plywood, CSA O151 for Canadian softwood plywood, for CSA O153 Poplar plywood, or CSAO325 for Construction sheathing)
Oriented strand board: specified with the Exposure 1 or Exterior bond classification in accordance with Voluntary Product Standard – Performance Standard for Wood‐Based Structural‐Use Panels (PS 2‐10)
Structural composite lumber: compliant in accordance with Standard Specification for Evaluation of Structural Composite Lumber Products (ASTM D 5456‐13)
Glued laminated timber: compliant in accordance with Structural Glued Laminated Timber (ANSI A190.1‐2012)
I‐joists: compliant in accordance with Standard Specification for Establishing and Monitoring Structural Capacities of Prefabricated Wood I‐Joists (ASTM D 5055‐13)
Cross‐laminated timber: compliant in accordance with Standard for Performance‐Rated Cross‐Laminated Timber (PRG 320‐15)
Finger‐jointed lumber: labeled “Heat Resistant Adhesive (HRA)” in accordance with the American Softwood Lumber Standard (DOC PS‐20 2015)

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
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Fentress Architects
Director of Sustainability

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Requirements

This credit includes requirements for product manufacturing as well as project teams. It covers volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in the indoor air and the VOC content of materials, as well as the testing methods by which indoor VOC emissions are determined. Different materials must meet different requirements to be considered compliant for this credit. The building interior and exterior are organized in seven categories, each with different thresholds of compliance. The building interior is defined as everything within the waterproofing membrane. The building exterior is defined as everything outside and inclusive of the primary and secondary weatherproofing system, such as waterproofing membranes and air- and water-resistive barrier materials.

Option 1. Product Category Calculations

Achieve the threshold level of compliance with emissions and content standards for the number of product categories listed in Table 2.

Table 1. Thresholds of compliance with emissions and content standards for 7 categories of materials

Category

Threshold

Emissions and content  requirements

Interior paints and coatings applied on site

At least 90%, by volume, for emissions; 100% for VOC content

  • General Emissions Evaluation for paints and coatings applied to walls, floors, and ceilings
  • VOC content requirements for wet applied products

Interior adhesives and sealants applied on site (including flooring adhesive)

At least 90%, by volume, for emissions; 100% for VOC content

  • General Emissions Evaluation
  • VOC content requirements for wet applied products

Flooring

100%

General Emissions Evaluation

Composite wood

100% not covered by other categories

Composite Wood Evaluation

Ceilings, walls, thermal, and acoustic insulation

100%

  • General Emissions Evaluation
  • Healthcare, Schools only
    Additional insulation requirements

Furniture (include in calculations if part of scope of work)

At least 90%, by cost

Furniture Evaluation

Healthcare and Schools Projects only: Exterior applied products

At least 90%, by volume

Exterior Applied Products

Table 2. Points for number of compliant categories of products

Compliant categories

Points

NC, CS, NC Retail, DC, WDC, NC Hos projects without furniture

2

1

4

2

5

3

NC, CS, NC Retail, DC, WDC, NC Hos projects with furniture, CI, CI Retail, CI Hos

3

1

5

2

6

3

Schools, HC without furniture

3

1

 

5

2

6

3

Schools, HC with furniture

4

1

6

2

7

3

Option 2. Budget Calculation Method

If some products in a category do not meet the criteria, project teams may use the budget calculation method (Table 3).

Table 3. Points for percentage compliance, under budget calculation method

Percentage of total

Points

≥ 50% and < 70%

1

≥ 70% and < 90%

2

≥ 90%

3

The budget method organizes the building interior into five assemblies:

  • flooring;
  • ceilings;
  • walls;
  • thermal and acoustic insulation;
  • furniture

Include furniture in the calculations if it is part of the scope of work. Walls, ceilings, and flooring are defined as building interior products; each layer of the assembly, including paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants, must be evaluated for compliance. Insulation is tracked separately.

Determine the total percentage of compliant materials according to Equation 1.

Equation 1. Total percentage compliance

Total % compliant for projects without furniture =

(% compliant walls + % compliant ceilings + % compliant flooring + % compliant insulation)

4

Total % compliant for projects with furniture =

(% compliant walls + % compliant ceilings + % compliant flooring + % compliant insulation) + (% compliant furniture)

5
Equation 2. System percentage compliant

Flooring, walls, ceilings, insulation % compliant =

(compliant surface area of layer 1 + compliant surface area of layer 2 + compliant surface area of layer 3 + …)

X 100

total surface area of layer 1 + total surface area of layer 2 + total surface area of layer 3 + …)
Equation 3. Furniture systems compliant, using ANSI/BIFMA evaluation

% compliant for furniture =

0.5 x cost compliant with §7.6.1 of ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 + cost compliant with §7.6.2 of ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011

X 100

total furniture cost

Calculate surface area of assembly layers based on the manufacturer’s documentation for application.

If 90% of an assembly meets the criteria, the system counts as 100% compliant. If less than 50% of an assembly meets the criteria, the assembly counts as 0% compliant.

Manufacturers’ claims. Both first-party and third-party statements of product compliance must follow the guidelines in CDPH SM V1.1–2010, Section 8. Organizations that certify manufacturers’ claims must be accredited under ISO Guide 65.

Laboratory requirements. Laboratories that conduct the tests specified in this credit must be accredited under ISO/IEC 17025 for the test methods they use.

Emissions and Content Requirements

To demonstrate compliance, a product or layer must meet all of the following requirements, as applicable.

Inherently nonemitting sources. Products that are inherently nonemitting sources of VOCs (stone, ceramic, powder-coated metals, plated or anodized metal, glass, concrete, clay brick, and unfinished or untreated solid wood) are considered fully compliant without any VOC emissions testing if they do not include integral organic-based surface coatings, binders, or sealants.

General emissions evaluation. Building products must be tested and determined compliant in accordance with California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method v1.1–2010, using the applicable exposure scenario. The default scenario is the private office scenario. The manufacturer’s or third-party certification must state the exposure scenario used to determine compliance. Claims of compliance for wet-applied products must state the amount applied in mass per surface area.

Manufacturers’ claims of compliance with the above requirements must also state the range of total VOCs after 14 days (336 hours), measured as specified in the CDPH Standard Method v1.1:

  • 0.5 mg/m3 or less;
  • between 0.5 and 5.0 mg/m3; or
  • 5.0 mg/m3 or more.

Projects outside the U.S. may use products tested and deemed compliant in accordance with either (1) the CDPH standard method (2010) or (2) the German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010). Test products either with (1) the CDPH Standard Method (2010), (2) the German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010), (3) ISO 16000-3: 2010, ISO 16000-6: 2011, ISO 16000-9: 2006, ISO 16000-11:2006 either in conjunction with AgBB, or with French legislation on VOC emission class labeling, or (4) the DIBt testing method (2010). If the applied testing method does not specify testing details for a product group for which the CDPH standard method does provide details, use the specifications in the CDPH standard method. U.S. projects must follow the CDPH standard method.

Additional VOC content requirements for wet-applied products. In addition to meeting the general requirements for VOC emissions (above), on-site wet-applied products must not contain excessive levels of VOCs, for the health of the installers and other tradesworkers who are exposed to these products. To demonstrate compliance, a product or layer must meet the following requirements, as applicable. Disclosure of VOC content must be made by the manufacturer. Any testing must follow the test method specified in the applicable regulation.

  • All paints and coatings wet-applied on site must meet the applicable VOC limits of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007, Suggested Control Measure (SCM) for Architectural Coatings, or the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1113, effective June 3, 2011.
  • All adhesives and sealants wet-applied on site must meet the applicable chemical content requirements of SCAQMD Rule 1168, July 1, 2005, Adhesive and Sealant Applications, as analyzed by the methods specified in Rule 1168. The provisions of SCAQMD Rule 1168 do not apply to adhesives and sealants subject to state or federal consumer product VOC regulations.
  • For projects outside the U.S., all paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants wet-applied on site must either meet the technical requirements of the above regulations, or comply with applicable national VOC control regulations, such as the European Decopaint Directive (2004/42/EC), the Canadian VOC Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings, or the Hong Kong Air Pollution Control (VOC) Regulation.
  • If the applicable regulation requires subtraction of exempt compounds, any content of intentionally added exempt compounds larger than 1% weight by mass (total exempt compounds) must be disclosed.
  • If a product cannot reasonably be tested as specified above, testing of VOC content must comply with ASTM D2369-10; ISO 11890, part 1; ASTM D6886-03; or ISO 11890-2.
  • For projects in North America, methylene chloride and perchloroethylene may not be intentionally added in paints, coatings, adhesives, or sealants.

Composite Wood Evaluation. Composite wood, as defined by the California Air Resources Board, Airborne Toxic Measure to Reduce Formaldehyde Emissions from Composite Wood Products Regulation, must be documented to have low formaldehyde emissions that meet the California Air Resources Board ATCM for formaldehyde requirements for ultra-low-emitting formaldehyde (ULEF) resins or no added formaldehyde resins. For projects outside the U.S., composite wood must be documented not to exceed a concentration limit of 0.05 ppm of formaldehyde (0.06 mg/m2-h when expressed as emission rate) as tested following either EN-717-1:2004, following ISO 16000-3: 2010, ISO 16000-6: 2011, ISO 16000-9: 2006, ISO 16000-11:2006, or following CEN/TS 16516: 2013 either in conjunction with AgBB or with Belgian or French legislation on VOC emission class labeling.

Salvaged and reused architectural millwork more than one year old at the time of occupancy is considered compliant, provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.

Furniture evaluation. New furniture and furnishing items must be tested in accordance with ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1–2011. Comply with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 (for half credit, by cost) OR 7.6.2 (for full credit, by cost), using either the concentration modeling approach or the emissions factor approach. Model the test results using the open plan, private office, or seating scenario in ANSI/BIFMA M7.1, as appropriate. USGBC-approved equivalent testing methodologies and contaminant thresholds are also acceptable. For classroom furniture, use the standard school classroom model in CDPH Standard Method v1.1. Documentation submitted for furniture must indicate the modeling scenario used to determine compliance.

Salvaged and reused furniture more than one year old at the time of use is considered compliant, provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.

Cost estimates for this credit

On each BD+C v4 credit, LEEDuser offers the wisdom of a team of architects, engineers, cost estimators, and LEED experts with hundreds of LEED projects between then. They analyzed the sustainable design strategies associated with each LEED credit, but also to assign actual costs to those strategies.

Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

This information is also available in a full PDF download in The Cost of LEED v4 report.

Learn more about The Cost of LEED v4 »

In the end, LEED is all about documentation. LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit, for premium members only, saves you time and helps you avoid mistakes with:

  • Calculators to help assess credit compliance.
  • Tracking spreadsheets for materials purchases.
  • Spreadsheets and forms to give to subs and other team members.
  • Guidance documents on arcane LEED issues.
  • Sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions.
  • Examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects.

What are the limits on the VOC budget method?

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Do products applied to the weather barrier need to comply with VOC thresholds? 

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If one part of my multicomponent wall system is not compliant, can I still get full credit?

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Our building is atypical, and the walls and ceilings are not clearly defined. How should we classify these components? 

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Is all solid wood considered inherently non-emitting? I’ve seen sources that say only solid wood flooring counts as inherently non-emitting.

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4/9/2019Updated: 4/9/2019
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Add definition for hot-mopped asphalt for roofing:

"a mopping-grade oxidized asphalt as defined by NIOSH: "an oxidized asphalt used principally in the construction of built-up roofing (BUR) and some modified bitumen systems; mopping-grade asphalts are produced in four grades (Types I through IV), according to the steepness of the roof”.
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/2/2018Updated: 7/6/2018
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Delete fourth bullet that reads: "Furniture is considered part of the scope if it is installed at the time of occupancy, regardless of who specified or provided it."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/5/2016Updated: 4/24/2018
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
April 6, 2018 Update:

In Table 5, for Insulation (thermal and acoustic), revise the first sentence in the Includes column so it reads: "Includes the following, if inside the building waterproofing membrane." Revise the first sentence in the Exceptions column so it reads "Insulation on interior or exterior of HVAC ductwork and insulation on any piping may be excluded (because of lack of modeling scenarios)." Also, revise the first sentence in the Calculations column so it reads "Total area of insulation is based on installed planar areas of each insulation type."

April 5, 2016 Entry:

In Table 5, for Insulation (thermal and acoustic), revise the first sentence in the Includes column so it reads: "Includes the following, if inside the building waterproofing membrane." Also revise the first sentence in the Calculations column so it reads "Total area of insulation is based on installed planar areas of each insulation type."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/5/2018Updated: 1/11/2018
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Under Requirements, revise inherently nonemitting sources sentence to read:

Inherently nonemitting sources. Products that are inherently nonemitting sources of VOCs (stone, ceramic, powder-coated metals, plated or anodized metal, glass, concrete, clay brick, and unfinished or untreated solid wood) are considered fully compliant without any VOC emissions testing if they do not include integral organic-based surface coatings, binders, or sealants.

Under Further Explanation, Inherently nonemitting materials, revise last two sentences as follows:

For the purposes of this credit, untreated and unfinished solid wood (not engineered wood) can also be considered nonemitting even though such materials will likely emit some amount of formaldehyde naturally.


Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/5/2018Updated: 1/11/2018
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Under Requirements, revise inherently nonemitting sources sentence to read:

Inherently nonemitting sources. Products that are inherently nonemitting sources of VOCs (stone, ceramic, powder-coated metals, plated or anodized metal, glass, concrete, clay brick, and unfinished or untreated solid wood) are considered fully compliant without any VOC emissions testing if they do not include integral organic-based surface coatings, binders, or sealants.

Under Further Explanation, Inherently nonemitting materials, revise last two sentences as follows:

For the purposes of this credit, untreated and unfinished solid wood (not engineered wood) can also be considered nonemitting even though such materials will likely emit some amount of formaldehyde naturally.


Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/27/2017Updated: 2/9/2017
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In Requirements, under Furniture evaluation, revise the second sentence to read: Comply with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 (for half credit, by cost) OR 7.6.2 (for full credit, by cost), using either the concentration modeling approach or the emissions factor approach.
In Further Explanation, Table 5, Furniture and furnishings, calculations column: revise the second sentence in the third paragraph to: "Use either a concentration modeling approach or emission factor approach.", and last sentence in the fourth paragraph to "Furniture compliant with Section 7.6.1 of BIFMA e3-2011 counts for half credit, by cost and furniture compliant with Section 7.6.2 of BIFMA e3–2011 counts for full credit, by cost. Furniture compliant with both sections is eligible for full credit, by cost, not to exceed 100% of the furniture cost.”
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/27/2017Updated: 2/9/2017
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In Requirements, under Furniture evaluation, revise the second sentence to read: Comply with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 (for half credit, by cost) OR 7.6.2 (for full credit, by cost), using either the concentration modeling approach or the emissions factor approach.
In Further Explanation, Table 5, Furniture and furnishings, calculations column: revise the second sentence in the third paragraph to: "Use either a concentration modeling approach or emission factor approach.", and last sentence in the fourth paragraph to "Furniture compliant with Section 7.6.1 of BIFMA e3-2011 counts for half credit, by cost and furniture compliant with Section 7.6.2 of BIFMA e3–2011 counts for full credit, by cost. Furniture compliant with both sections is eligible for full credit, by cost, not to exceed 100% of the furniture cost.”
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/1/2015Updated: 6/16/2015
Form Update
Description of change:
Revised the Low-Emitting Materials Calculator with the following:
- Allow inherently nonemitting products for Option 1.
- Revised Option 2's Assembly Name column so that duplicate entries are allowed.
- For each emissions criteria, added an option for products that don't meet the requirements.
- Corrected and added missing allowable VOC content to SCAQMD 1113, SCAQMD 1168, CARB 2007, and Hong Kong Air Pollution Control Regulation.
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/1/2014Updated: 2/14/2015
Form Update
Description of change:
In the assumptions table, revised Canadian VOC limits and added CARB 2007 limits.
Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/14/2019
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are using credit substitution to pursue the LEED v4.1 Low-emitting materials credit for our LEED v4 project. Is it acceptable to follow the LEED v4.1 credit requirements as written but meet the earlier versions of the referenced standards, as allowed in the LEED v4 credit?

Ruling:

Yes, LEED v4 projects using the Low-emitting materials credit from LEED v4.1 via credit substitution may alternatively use the following low-emitting criteria in lieu of the LEED v4.1 requirement:

• For VOC emissions evaluation Option 1: test in accordance with CDPH v1.1-2010 and comply with the VOC limits in Table 4-1 of CDPH v1.1-2010
• For VOC emissions evaluation Option 2: test in accordance with German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010) and comply with the LCI values in German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010)
• For VOC content evaluation: SCAQMD Rule 1113, effective June 3, 2011; SCAQMD Rule 1168, July 1 2005
• For furniture emissions evaluation: Product has been tested in accordance with ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1–2011 and complies with ANSI/BIFMA e3-2011 or ANSI/BIFMA e3-2012, Sections 7.6.1 (for half credit, by cost) OR 7.6.2 (for full credit, by cost).

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/2/2017
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are looking for clarification on the applicability of structural engineered wood products in the LEED v4 Low-emitting materials credit. As currently written, the credit leaves LEED users wondering how to qualify engineered wood products/assemblies.

For general emissions evaluation, the scope of California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard v1.1 clearly states the standard does not apply to structural products. Therefore, it is not an appropriate test for structural wood products. Specifically, Section 1.1.4 of CDPH v1.11 reads:
“1.1.4 The Standard does not apply to structural building products, janitorial products, air fresheners, electronic air cleaners, and other electronic equipment.”

Additionally, for the composite wood evaluation, the California Air Resource Board (CARB) exempts structural wood products from their regulation. Therefore, there is no way to have documentation for these products to meet CARB ATCM for formaldehyde for ultra-low emitting formaldehyde or no added formaldehyde resins.

Please clarify how to address these products in the credit.

Ruling:

Due to the complexity of applying the VOC emissions testing per CDPH v1.1 Standard Method to structural wood products, these products are not required to meet the general emissions evaluation. Structural wood products include: structural plywood, oriented strand board, structural composite lumber, glued laminated timber, I-joists, cross-laminated timber, and finger-jointed lumber.

Structural wood products are considered compliant if they are made with moisture resistant adhesives meeting ASTM 2559, have no surface treatments with added urea-formaldehyde resins or coatings, and if they are certified according to one of the following industry standards:

Plywood: compliant in accordance with Voluntary Product Standard ‐ Structural Plywood (PS 1‐09), Voluntary Product Standard – Performance Standard for Wood‐Based Structural‐Use Panels (PS 2‐10), or one of the standards considered by CARB to be equivalent to PS 1 or PS 2: (AS/NZS 2269, EN 636 3S (including CE label), Canadian Standards Association CSA O121 for Douglas fir plywood, CSA O151 for Canadian softwood plywood, for CSA O153 Poplar plywood, or CSAO325 for Construction sheathing)
Oriented strand board: specified with the Exposure 1 or Exterior bond classification in accordance with Voluntary Product Standard – Performance Standard for Wood‐Based Structural‐Use Panels (PS 2‐10)
Structural composite lumber: compliant in accordance with Standard Specification for Evaluation of Structural Composite Lumber Products (ASTM D 5456‐13)
Glued laminated timber: compliant in accordance with Structural Glued Laminated Timber (ANSI A190.1‐2012)
I‐joists: compliant in accordance with Standard Specification for Establishing and Monitoring Structural Capacities of Prefabricated Wood I‐Joists (ASTM D 5055‐13)
Cross‐laminated timber: compliant in accordance with Standard for Performance‐Rated Cross‐Laminated Timber (PRG 320‐15)
Finger‐jointed lumber: labeled “Heat Resistant Adhesive (HRA)” in accordance with the American Softwood Lumber Standard (DOC PS‐20 2015)

***LI updated on 4/9/21 as follows:***
Due to the complexity of applying the VOC emissions testing per CDPH v1.1 Standard Method to structural wood products, these products are not required to meet the general emissions evaluation.  Structural wood products include: structural plywood, oriented strand board, structural composite lumber, glued laminated timber, I-joists, cross-laminated timber, and finger-jointed lumber.
 
Structural wood products are considered compliant if they are certified according to one of the following industry standards:

Wood structural panel manufactured according to PS 1-09 or PS 2-10 (or one of the standards considered by CARB to be equivalent to PS 1 or PS 2) and labeled bond classification Exposure 1 or Exterior
Structural wood product manufactured according to ASTM D 5456 (for structural composite lumber), ANSI A190.1 (for glued laminated timber), ASTM D 5055 (for I-joists), ANSI PRG 320 (for cross-laminated timber), or PS 20-15 (for finger-jointed lumber).
Projects in Canada may instead use wood structural panels and structural wood products manufactured according to one of the following Exposure 1 or Exterior standards.  CSA O121 for Douglas fir plywood, Canadian Standards Association, CSA O151 for Canadian softwood plywood, CSA O153 Poplar plywood, CSA O325 for Construction sheathing)
Projects in Australia may instead use AS/NZS 2269, Plywood-Structural, Standards Australia
Projects in Europe may instead use wood structural panels and structural wood products manufactured according to EN 636 3S, Plywood-Specifications, European Committee for Standardization (CEN).

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/2/2017
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are looking for clarification on the applicability of structural engineered wood products in the LEED v4 Low-emitting materials credit. As currently written, the credit leaves LEED users wondering how to qualify engineered wood products/assemblies.

For general emissions evaluation, the scope of California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard v1.1 clearly states the standard does not apply to structural products. Therefore, it is not an appropriate test for structural wood products. Specifically, Section 1.1.4 of CDPH v1.11 reads:
“1.1.4 The Standard does not apply to structural building products, janitorial products, air fresheners, electronic air cleaners, and other electronic equipment.”

Additionally, for the composite wood evaluation, the California Air Resource Board (CARB) exempts structural wood products from their regulation. Therefore, there is no way to have documentation for these products to meet CARB ATCM for formaldehyde for ultra-low emitting formaldehyde or no added formaldehyde resins.

Please clarify how to address these products in the credit.

Ruling:

Due to the complexity of applying the VOC emissions testing per CDPH v1.1 Standard Method to structural wood products, these products are not required to meet the general emissions evaluation. Structural wood products include: structural plywood, oriented strand board, structural composite lumber, glued laminated timber, I-joists, cross-laminated timber, and finger-jointed lumber.

Structural wood products are considered compliant if they are made with moisture resistant adhesives meeting ASTM 2559, have no surface treatments with added urea-formaldehyde resins or coatings, and if they are certified according to one of the following industry standards:

Plywood: compliant in accordance with Voluntary Product Standard ‐ Structural Plywood (PS 1‐09), Voluntary Product Standard – Performance Standard for Wood‐Based Structural‐Use Panels (PS 2‐10), or one of the standards considered by CARB to be equivalent to PS 1 or PS 2: (AS/NZS 2269, EN 636 3S (including CE label), Canadian Standards Association CSA O121 for Douglas fir plywood, CSA O151 for Canadian softwood plywood, for CSA O153 Poplar plywood, or CSAO325 for Construction sheathing)
Oriented strand board: specified with the Exposure 1 or Exterior bond classification in accordance with Voluntary Product Standard – Performance Standard for Wood‐Based Structural‐Use Panels (PS 2‐10)
Structural composite lumber: compliant in accordance with Standard Specification for Evaluation of Structural Composite Lumber Products (ASTM D 5456‐13)
Glued laminated timber: compliant in accordance with Structural Glued Laminated Timber (ANSI A190.1‐2012)
I‐joists: compliant in accordance with Standard Specification for Establishing and Monitoring Structural Capacities of Prefabricated Wood I‐Joists (ASTM D 5055‐13)
Cross‐laminated timber: compliant in accordance with Standard for Performance‐Rated Cross‐Laminated Timber (PRG 320‐15)
Finger‐jointed lumber: labeled “Heat Resistant Adhesive (HRA)” in accordance with the American Softwood Lumber Standard (DOC PS‐20 2015)

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No

LEEDuser expert

Deborah Lucking

AIA, LEED AP BD+C

Fentress Architects
Director of Sustainability

See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Subscribe to new discussions about Hospitality-NC-v4 EQc2 View the LEED v4.1 version of this credit