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LEED v4
Hospitality – Commercial Interiors
Energy and Atmosphere

Advanced energy metering

LEED CREDIT

Hospitality-CI-v4 EAc3: Advanced Energy Metering 1-2 points

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View the LEED v4.1 version of this credit »

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Marcus Sheffer

7group / Energy Opportunities
LEED Fellow

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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

Option 1. Metering (1 point)
Install new or use existing tenant-level energy meters to provide tenant-level data representing total tenant energy consumption (electricity, natural gas, chilled water, steam, fuel oil, propane,biomass, etc.). Utility-owned meters are acceptable. Commit to sharing with USGBC the resulting energy consumption data and electrical demand data (if metered) for a five-year period beginning on the date the project accepts LEED certification. At a minimum, energy consumption must be tracked at one-month intervals. This commitment must carry forward for five years or until the space changes ownership or lessee.
Option 2. Advanced metering (2 points)
Install advanced energy metering for the following:
  • all energy sources used in the tenant space; and
  • any individual energy end uses that represent 10% or more of the total annual consumption of the tenant space.
The advanced energy metering must have the following characteristics.
  • Meters must be permanently installed, record at intervals of one hour or less, and transmit data to a remote location.
  • Electricity meters must record both consumption and demand. Whole-building electricity meters should record the power factor, if appropriate.
  • The data collection system must use a local area network, building automation system, wireless network, or comparable communication infrastructure.
  • The system must be capable of storing all meter data for at least 18 months.
  • The data must be remotely accessible.
  • All meters in the system must be capable of reporting hourly, daily, monthly, and annual energy use.
See all forum discussions about this credit »

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Learn more about The Cost of LEED v4 »

Frequently asked questions

We are proposing to metering a new building with a single controller. The controller has the capability to monitor each individual end use (lighting, plug loads, HVAC, water, gas, etc.). Can we meter everything on a distribution board except one specific end-use, such as HVAC, and have the controller programmed to calculate the difference in the main power usage and all the metering loads to determine the remaining loads (HVAC loads) and still obtain the advanced energy metering credit?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

See all forum discussions about this credit »

Addenda

4/10/2020Updated: 4/22/2020
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In Further Explanation, Determining Major Energy End Uses, before the paragraph starting with “Choosing what equipment and components to group”, add the following paragraph:

It is acceptable to exclude a small portion of the total loads from each end-use category. Not more than 10% of the total connected load of any of the required end-uses is permitted to be excluded from that end-use advanced metering data collection. Not more than 10% of the total connected load of any of the end-uses where metering is required is permitted to consist of loads not part of that end-use.
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/1/2016Updated: 8/29/2016
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Option 1: Tenant-Level Metering:
Step 1: At the end of Step 1, add the following text: "Base building service water heating does not need to be metered.

This option does not require metering of locally generated sources of energy that are dedicated to the project space, such as the following:
• Solar photovoltaic- generated electricity
• Wind-generated electricity
• Solar hot water generation for domestic hot water or heating hot water

This option also does not require tenant-level metering of the energy consumption associated with shared components of Air Handling Units or DX units serving both the project space and areas outside of the project space such as:
• Dedicated or 100% outside air systems
• Multiple-zone recirculating systems
• VRF outdoor units

Any components of the shared AHU or DX system that exclusively serve the project space must be included in the tenant metered energy, such as:
VAV fan-powered terminals (including the electricity from fans or electric heating coils, and any hot water from hot water coils)
• VRF indoor units
• 4-pipe fan coil units (including the fan electricity, the chilled water, and the hot water)"

Step 5: Before the sentence "To see the most recent list of data-sharing pathways, visit USGBC’s credit library, at usgbc.org/credits", add the following text: "If the energy consumption associated with shared AHUs is excluded from the total energy consumption, details regarding the equipment excluded must be reported as part of the data sharing."

Step-by-Step Guidance, Option 2: Advanced Metering:

Step 1: At the end of Step 1, after the sentence "Advanced metering must be installed for the following sources of energy delivered to the project", replace the first bullet with the following text: "The same sources of energy described in Option 1. Tenant Level Metering."

Remove text: "Both inputs and outputs of nonrenewable energy sources must be metered:
Fuel input
Electricity output
Recovered heat (if applicable)"

FURTHER EXPLANATION: Determining Major Energy End Uses: Replace current text up until the paragraph that begins "Energy modeling software that is acceptable..." with the following text:

Defining appropriate energy end uses is crucial to the success of an advanced energy metering program and energy management plan. Low data granularity, such as with whole-building energy data, will not help a building operator or tenant understand or identify sources of anomalies in energy consumption and does not meet the intent of this credit.

Extreme granularity, achieved by metering every piece of equipment in a building, may be cost prohibitive because of the quantity of equipment and the data storage capacity required. In addition, too much information may overwhelm an energy manager and may hamper the effectiveness of an energy management program.
Identifying major energy end uses for the tenant space is the first step in choosing what to meter. Often, in large commercial or industrial buildings, eEnd uses are often classified as systems composed of discrete pieces of equipment that can be metered together. For example, for a tenant space:
• Chilled Water Meter
• Hot Water Meter
1. Chilled water system: chillers, chilled water pumps
2. Condenser water system: cooling tower, condenser water pumps
3. Hot water system (natural gas): boilers
4. Hot water system (electricity): hot water pumps
5. Air-handling system: supply fan, return fan, damper motors
Smaller buildings may not have large systems that areSome systems may not be easily segregated by function. A common example is a rooftop unit (RTU), a single packaged piece of equipment that can provide the cooling, heating, and air handling but is cost and space prohibitive to submeter. Therefore, metering the entire RTU (or metering each fuel supplying the RTU, if there is more than one) is an acceptable way to achieve this credit. Even though metering the energy usage of each system component of a packaged system is not practical, the performance of each system component should be monitored by the building automation system.

The metering strategy for systems that serve the same basic function, such as multiple built-up air-handling units serving a 1,000,000-square-foot (92 900-square-meter) multitenant office buildingtenant office space spanning several floors, or multiple RTUs serving a 25,000-square-foot (2 325-square-meter) physician’s officeretail tenant, is left to the discretion of the project team. Examples of options for submetering these systems include the following:

• Meter all similar systems together. This strategy is appropriate for multiple systems that serve the same type of occupant and operate according to the same schedule.
• Meter all similar systems separately. This strategy is appropriate if each system serves a different type of occupancy group or has a different operating schedule.
• Meter similar systems by grouped occupancy type or operating schedule. This strategy is a combination of the above.

Choosing what equipment and components to group requires a balance between keeping the project costs on budget while ensuring that robust data are available for future decision making.
Examples of typical end uses for a commercial office building tenant that may require advanced metering include the following:
o Receptacle equipment
o Interior lighting
o Space heating
o Space cooling
o Fans

FURTHER EXPLANATION: Add new section after "Determining Major Energy End Uses" titled "Shared Building Energy AHUs or Renewable Generation Systems". Add the following text under this new section heading:

Tenant-level metering of end-uses may not be feasible for tenants that have shared Air Handling Units or renewable generation systems. The following path may be used to document compliance for shared systems.

Option 1. Tenant-Level Metering
This option does not require tenant-level metering of the energy consumption associated with shared Air Handling Units, shared renewable systems, or shared DX units serving both the project space and areas outside of the project space. This option also does not require metering for renewable generation systems allocated to the project space.

Option 2. Advanced Metering
For shared air handling units, and/or shared renewable energy generation systems with renewable energy allocated to the project space:
• Provide documentation showing that the Building complies with LEED BD&C requirements for Advanced Energy Metering (either by uploading the BD&C LEED Review report for the building showing the credit has been approved, or by uploading the required submittals for LEED BD&C for the building). The building-level documentation may be provided only for shared systems that represent more than 10% of the building energy consumption (e.g. heating, cooling, service water heating), and does not need to be provided for tenant energy sources or end-uses that are entirely contained within the project space (e.g. interior lighting, receptacle equipment, etc.).

REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION:
Add "except shared AHUs or DX units" after the words "energy sources" in the first two rows.
Add "tenant-level" before the words "advanced meters" in the third row.
Add the following text in additional fifth row to documentation table, required for both Option 1 and Option 2: "Controls drawings or single-line diagrams indicating all meters"
Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/1/2016Updated: 8/29/2016
Form Update
Description of change:
Option 1: Tenant-Level Metering:
Step 1: At the end of Step 1, add the following text: "Base building service water heating does not need to be metered.

This option does not require metering of locally generated sources of energy that are dedicated to the project space, such as the following:
• Solar photovoltaic- generated electricity
• Wind-generated electricity
• Solar hot water generation for domestic hot water or heating hot water

This option also does not require tenant-level metering of the energy consumption associated with shared components of Air Handling Units or DX units serving both the project space and areas outside of the project space such as:
• Dedicated or 100% outside air systems
• Multiple-zone recirculating systems
• VRF outdoor units

Any components of the shared AHU or DX system that exclusively serve the project space must be included in the tenant metered energy, such as:
VAV fan-powered terminals (including the electricity from fans or electric heating coils, and any hot water from hot water coils)
• VRF indoor units
• 4-pipe fan coil units (including the fan electricity, the chilled water, and the hot water)"

Step 5: Before the sentence "To see the most recent list of data-sharing pathways, visit USGBC’s credit library, at usgbc.org/credits", add the following text: "If the energy consumption associated with shared AHUs is excluded from the total energy consumption, details regarding the equipment excluded must be reported as part of the data sharing."

Step-by-Step Guidance, Option 2: Advanced Metering:

Step 1: At the end of Step 1, after the sentence "Advanced metering must be installed for the following sources of energy delivered to the project", replace the first bullet with the following text: "The same sources of energy described in Option 1. Tenant Level Metering."

Remove text: "Both inputs and outputs of nonrenewable energy sources must be metered:
Fuel input
Electricity output
Recovered heat (if applicable)"

FURTHER EXPLANATION: Determining Major Energy End Uses: Replace current text up until the paragraph that begins "Energy modeling software that is acceptable..." with the following text:

Defining appropriate energy end uses is crucial to the success of an advanced energy metering program and energy management plan. Low data granularity, such as with whole-building energy data, will not help a building operator or tenant understand or identify sources of anomalies in energy consumption and does not meet the intent of this credit.

Extreme granularity, achieved by metering every piece of equipment in a building, may be cost prohibitive because of the quantity of equipment and the data storage capacity required. In addition, too much information may overwhelm an energy manager and may hamper the effectiveness of an energy management program.
Identifying major energy end uses for the tenant space is the first step in choosing what to meter. Often, in large commercial or industrial buildings, eEnd uses are often classified as systems composed of discrete pieces of equipment that can be metered together. For example, for a tenant space:
• Chilled Water Meter
• Hot Water Meter
1. Chilled water system: chillers, chilled water pumps
2. Condenser water system: cooling tower, condenser water pumps
3. Hot water system (natural gas): boilers
4. Hot water system (electricity): hot water pumps
5. Air-handling system: supply fan, return fan, damper motors
Smaller buildings may not have large systems that areSome systems may not be easily segregated by function. A common example is a rooftop unit (RTU), a single packaged piece of equipment that can provide the cooling, heating, and air handling but is cost and space prohibitive to submeter. Therefore, metering the entire RTU (or metering each fuel supplying the RTU, if there is more than one) is an acceptable way to achieve this credit. Even though metering the energy usage of each system component of a packaged system is not practical, the performance of each system component should be monitored by the building automation system.

The metering strategy for systems that serve the same basic function, such as multiple built-up air-handling units serving a 1,000,000-square-foot (92 900-square-meter) multitenant office buildingtenant office space spanning several floors, or multiple RTUs serving a 25,000-square-foot (2 325-square-meter) physician’s officeretail tenant, is left to the discretion of the project team. Examples of options for submetering these systems include the following:

• Meter all similar systems together. This strategy is appropriate for multiple systems that serve the same type of occupant and operate according to the same schedule.
• Meter all similar systems separately. This strategy is appropriate if each system serves a different type of occupancy group or has a different operating schedule.
• Meter similar systems by grouped occupancy type or operating schedule. This strategy is a combination of the above.

Choosing what equipment and components to group requires a balance between keeping the project costs on budget while ensuring that robust data are available for future decision making.
Examples of typical end uses for a commercial office building tenant that may require advanced metering include the following:
o Receptacle equipment
o Interior lighting
o Space heating
o Space cooling
o Fans

FURTHER EXPLANATION: Add new section after "Determining Major Energy End Uses" titled "Shared Building Energy AHUs or Renewable Generation Systems". Add the following text under this new section heading:

Tenant-level metering of end-uses may not be feasible for tenants that have shared Air Handling Units or renewable generation systems. The following path may be used to document compliance for shared systems.

Option 1. Tenant-Level Metering
This option does not require tenant-level metering of the energy consumption associated with shared Air Handling Units, shared renewable systems, or shared DX units serving both the project space and areas outside of the project space. This option also does not require metering for renewable generation systems allocated to the project space.

Option 2. Advanced Metering
For shared air handling units, and/or shared renewable energy generation systems with renewable energy allocated to the project space:
• Provide documentation showing that the Building complies with LEED BD&C requirements for Advanced Energy Metering (either by uploading the BD&C LEED Review report for the building showing the credit has been approved, or by uploading the required submittals for LEED BD&C for the building). The building-level documentation may be provided only for shared systems that represent more than 10% of the building energy consumption (e.g. heating, cooling, service water heating), and does not need to be provided for tenant energy sources or end-uses that are entirely contained within the project space (e.g. interior lighting, receptacle equipment, etc.).

REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION:
Add "except shared AHUs or DX units" after the words "energy sources" in the first two rows.
Add "tenant-level" before the words "advanced meters" in the third row.
Add the following text in additional fifth row to documentation table, required for both Option 1 and Option 2: "Controls drawings or single-line diagrams indicating all meters"
Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
See all forum discussions about this credit »

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LEEDuser expert

Marcus Sheffer

7group / Energy Opportunities
LEED Fellow

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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

Option 1. Metering (1 point)
Install new or use existing tenant-level energy meters to provide tenant-level data representing total tenant energy consumption (electricity, natural gas, chilled water, steam, fuel oil, propane,biomass, etc.). Utility-owned meters are acceptable. Commit to sharing with USGBC the resulting energy consumption data and electrical demand data (if metered) for a five-year period beginning on the date the project accepts LEED certification. At a minimum, energy consumption must be tracked at one-month intervals. This commitment must carry forward for five years or until the space changes ownership or lessee.
Option 2. Advanced metering (2 points)
Install advanced energy metering for the following:
  • all energy sources used in the tenant space; and
  • any individual energy end uses that represent 10% or more of the total annual consumption of the tenant space.
The advanced energy metering must have the following characteristics.
  • Meters must be permanently installed, record at intervals of one hour or less, and transmit data to a remote location.
  • Electricity meters must record both consumption and demand. Whole-building electricity meters should record the power factor, if appropriate.
  • The data collection system must use a local area network, building automation system, wireless network, or comparable communication infrastructure.
  • The system must be capable of storing all meter data for at least 18 months.
  • The data must be remotely accessible.
  • All meters in the system must be capable of reporting hourly, daily, monthly, and annual energy use.

We are proposing to metering a new building with a single controller. The controller has the capability to monitor each individual end use (lighting, plug loads, HVAC, water, gas, etc.). Can we meter everything on a distribution board except one specific end-use, such as HVAC, and have the controller programmed to calculate the difference in the main power usage and all the metering loads to determine the remaining loads (HVAC loads) and still obtain the advanced energy metering credit?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

4/10/2020Updated: 4/22/2020
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In Further Explanation, Determining Major Energy End Uses, before the paragraph starting with “Choosing what equipment and components to group”, add the following paragraph:

It is acceptable to exclude a small portion of the total loads from each end-use category. Not more than 10% of the total connected load of any of the required end-uses is permitted to be excluded from that end-use advanced metering data collection. Not more than 10% of the total connected load of any of the end-uses where metering is required is permitted to consist of loads not part of that end-use.
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/1/2016Updated: 8/29/2016
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Option 1: Tenant-Level Metering:
Step 1: At the end of Step 1, add the following text: "Base building service water heating does not need to be metered.

This option does not require metering of locally generated sources of energy that are dedicated to the project space, such as the following:
• Solar photovoltaic- generated electricity
• Wind-generated electricity
• Solar hot water generation for domestic hot water or heating hot water

This option also does not require tenant-level metering of the energy consumption associated with shared components of Air Handling Units or DX units serving both the project space and areas outside of the project space such as:
• Dedicated or 100% outside air systems
• Multiple-zone recirculating systems
• VRF outdoor units

Any components of the shared AHU or DX system that exclusively serve the project space must be included in the tenant metered energy, such as:
VAV fan-powered terminals (including the electricity from fans or electric heating coils, and any hot water from hot water coils)
• VRF indoor units
• 4-pipe fan coil units (including the fan electricity, the chilled water, and the hot water)"

Step 5: Before the sentence "To see the most recent list of data-sharing pathways, visit USGBC’s credit library, at usgbc.org/credits", add the following text: "If the energy consumption associated with shared AHUs is excluded from the total energy consumption, details regarding the equipment excluded must be reported as part of the data sharing."

Step-by-Step Guidance, Option 2: Advanced Metering:

Step 1: At the end of Step 1, after the sentence "Advanced metering must be installed for the following sources of energy delivered to the project", replace the first bullet with the following text: "The same sources of energy described in Option 1. Tenant Level Metering."

Remove text: "Both inputs and outputs of nonrenewable energy sources must be metered:
Fuel input
Electricity output
Recovered heat (if applicable)"

FURTHER EXPLANATION: Determining Major Energy End Uses: Replace current text up until the paragraph that begins "Energy modeling software that is acceptable..." with the following text:

Defining appropriate energy end uses is crucial to the success of an advanced energy metering program and energy management plan. Low data granularity, such as with whole-building energy data, will not help a building operator or tenant understand or identify sources of anomalies in energy consumption and does not meet the intent of this credit.

Extreme granularity, achieved by metering every piece of equipment in a building, may be cost prohibitive because of the quantity of equipment and the data storage capacity required. In addition, too much information may overwhelm an energy manager and may hamper the effectiveness of an energy management program.
Identifying major energy end uses for the tenant space is the first step in choosing what to meter. Often, in large commercial or industrial buildings, eEnd uses are often classified as systems composed of discrete pieces of equipment that can be metered together. For example, for a tenant space:
• Chilled Water Meter
• Hot Water Meter
1. Chilled water system: chillers, chilled water pumps
2. Condenser water system: cooling tower, condenser water pumps
3. Hot water system (natural gas): boilers
4. Hot water system (electricity): hot water pumps
5. Air-handling system: supply fan, return fan, damper motors
Smaller buildings may not have large systems that areSome systems may not be easily segregated by function. A common example is a rooftop unit (RTU), a single packaged piece of equipment that can provide the cooling, heating, and air handling but is cost and space prohibitive to submeter. Therefore, metering the entire RTU (or metering each fuel supplying the RTU, if there is more than one) is an acceptable way to achieve this credit. Even though metering the energy usage of each system component of a packaged system is not practical, the performance of each system component should be monitored by the building automation system.

The metering strategy for systems that serve the same basic function, such as multiple built-up air-handling units serving a 1,000,000-square-foot (92 900-square-meter) multitenant office buildingtenant office space spanning several floors, or multiple RTUs serving a 25,000-square-foot (2 325-square-meter) physician’s officeretail tenant, is left to the discretion of the project team. Examples of options for submetering these systems include the following:

• Meter all similar systems together. This strategy is appropriate for multiple systems that serve the same type of occupant and operate according to the same schedule.
• Meter all similar systems separately. This strategy is appropriate if each system serves a different type of occupancy group or has a different operating schedule.
• Meter similar systems by grouped occupancy type or operating schedule. This strategy is a combination of the above.

Choosing what equipment and components to group requires a balance between keeping the project costs on budget while ensuring that robust data are available for future decision making.
Examples of typical end uses for a commercial office building tenant that may require advanced metering include the following:
o Receptacle equipment
o Interior lighting
o Space heating
o Space cooling
o Fans

FURTHER EXPLANATION: Add new section after "Determining Major Energy End Uses" titled "Shared Building Energy AHUs or Renewable Generation Systems". Add the following text under this new section heading:

Tenant-level metering of end-uses may not be feasible for tenants that have shared Air Handling Units or renewable generation systems. The following path may be used to document compliance for shared systems.

Option 1. Tenant-Level Metering
This option does not require tenant-level metering of the energy consumption associated with shared Air Handling Units, shared renewable systems, or shared DX units serving both the project space and areas outside of the project space. This option also does not require metering for renewable generation systems allocated to the project space.

Option 2. Advanced Metering
For shared air handling units, and/or shared renewable energy generation systems with renewable energy allocated to the project space:
• Provide documentation showing that the Building complies with LEED BD&C requirements for Advanced Energy Metering (either by uploading the BD&C LEED Review report for the building showing the credit has been approved, or by uploading the required submittals for LEED BD&C for the building). The building-level documentation may be provided only for shared systems that represent more than 10% of the building energy consumption (e.g. heating, cooling, service water heating), and does not need to be provided for tenant energy sources or end-uses that are entirely contained within the project space (e.g. interior lighting, receptacle equipment, etc.).

REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION:
Add "except shared AHUs or DX units" after the words "energy sources" in the first two rows.
Add "tenant-level" before the words "advanced meters" in the third row.
Add the following text in additional fifth row to documentation table, required for both Option 1 and Option 2: "Controls drawings or single-line diagrams indicating all meters"
Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/1/2016Updated: 8/29/2016
Form Update
Description of change:
Option 1: Tenant-Level Metering:
Step 1: At the end of Step 1, add the following text: "Base building service water heating does not need to be metered.

This option does not require metering of locally generated sources of energy that are dedicated to the project space, such as the following:
• Solar photovoltaic- generated electricity
• Wind-generated electricity
• Solar hot water generation for domestic hot water or heating hot water

This option also does not require tenant-level metering of the energy consumption associated with shared components of Air Handling Units or DX units serving both the project space and areas outside of the project space such as:
• Dedicated or 100% outside air systems
• Multiple-zone recirculating systems
• VRF outdoor units

Any components of the shared AHU or DX system that exclusively serve the project space must be included in the tenant metered energy, such as:
VAV fan-powered terminals (including the electricity from fans or electric heating coils, and any hot water from hot water coils)
• VRF indoor units
• 4-pipe fan coil units (including the fan electricity, the chilled water, and the hot water)"

Step 5: Before the sentence "To see the most recent list of data-sharing pathways, visit USGBC’s credit library, at usgbc.org/credits", add the following text: "If the energy consumption associated with shared AHUs is excluded from the total energy consumption, details regarding the equipment excluded must be reported as part of the data sharing."

Step-by-Step Guidance, Option 2: Advanced Metering:

Step 1: At the end of Step 1, after the sentence "Advanced metering must be installed for the following sources of energy delivered to the project", replace the first bullet with the following text: "The same sources of energy described in Option 1. Tenant Level Metering."

Remove text: "Both inputs and outputs of nonrenewable energy sources must be metered:
Fuel input
Electricity output
Recovered heat (if applicable)"

FURTHER EXPLANATION: Determining Major Energy End Uses: Replace current text up until the paragraph that begins "Energy modeling software that is acceptable..." with the following text:

Defining appropriate energy end uses is crucial to the success of an advanced energy metering program and energy management plan. Low data granularity, such as with whole-building energy data, will not help a building operator or tenant understand or identify sources of anomalies in energy consumption and does not meet the intent of this credit.

Extreme granularity, achieved by metering every piece of equipment in a building, may be cost prohibitive because of the quantity of equipment and the data storage capacity required. In addition, too much information may overwhelm an energy manager and may hamper the effectiveness of an energy management program.
Identifying major energy end uses for the tenant space is the first step in choosing what to meter. Often, in large commercial or industrial buildings, eEnd uses are often classified as systems composed of discrete pieces of equipment that can be metered together. For example, for a tenant space:
• Chilled Water Meter
• Hot Water Meter
1. Chilled water system: chillers, chilled water pumps
2. Condenser water system: cooling tower, condenser water pumps
3. Hot water system (natural gas): boilers
4. Hot water system (electricity): hot water pumps
5. Air-handling system: supply fan, return fan, damper motors
Smaller buildings may not have large systems that areSome systems may not be easily segregated by function. A common example is a rooftop unit (RTU), a single packaged piece of equipment that can provide the cooling, heating, and air handling but is cost and space prohibitive to submeter. Therefore, metering the entire RTU (or metering each fuel supplying the RTU, if there is more than one) is an acceptable way to achieve this credit. Even though metering the energy usage of each system component of a packaged system is not practical, the performance of each system component should be monitored by the building automation system.

The metering strategy for systems that serve the same basic function, such as multiple built-up air-handling units serving a 1,000,000-square-foot (92 900-square-meter) multitenant office buildingtenant office space spanning several floors, or multiple RTUs serving a 25,000-square-foot (2 325-square-meter) physician’s officeretail tenant, is left to the discretion of the project team. Examples of options for submetering these systems include the following:

• Meter all similar systems together. This strategy is appropriate for multiple systems that serve the same type of occupant and operate according to the same schedule.
• Meter all similar systems separately. This strategy is appropriate if each system serves a different type of occupancy group or has a different operating schedule.
• Meter similar systems by grouped occupancy type or operating schedule. This strategy is a combination of the above.

Choosing what equipment and components to group requires a balance between keeping the project costs on budget while ensuring that robust data are available for future decision making.
Examples of typical end uses for a commercial office building tenant that may require advanced metering include the following:
o Receptacle equipment
o Interior lighting
o Space heating
o Space cooling
o Fans

FURTHER EXPLANATION: Add new section after "Determining Major Energy End Uses" titled "Shared Building Energy AHUs or Renewable Generation Systems". Add the following text under this new section heading:

Tenant-level metering of end-uses may not be feasible for tenants that have shared Air Handling Units or renewable generation systems. The following path may be used to document compliance for shared systems.

Option 1. Tenant-Level Metering
This option does not require tenant-level metering of the energy consumption associated with shared Air Handling Units, shared renewable systems, or shared DX units serving both the project space and areas outside of the project space. This option also does not require metering for renewable generation systems allocated to the project space.

Option 2. Advanced Metering
For shared air handling units, and/or shared renewable energy generation systems with renewable energy allocated to the project space:
• Provide documentation showing that the Building complies with LEED BD&C requirements for Advanced Energy Metering (either by uploading the BD&C LEED Review report for the building showing the credit has been approved, or by uploading the required submittals for LEED BD&C for the building). The building-level documentation may be provided only for shared systems that represent more than 10% of the building energy consumption (e.g. heating, cooling, service water heating), and does not need to be provided for tenant energy sources or end-uses that are entirely contained within the project space (e.g. interior lighting, receptacle equipment, etc.).

REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION:
Add "except shared AHUs or DX units" after the words "energy sources" in the first two rows.
Add "tenant-level" before the words "advanced meters" in the third row.
Add the following text in additional fifth row to documentation table, required for both Option 1 and Option 2: "Controls drawings or single-line diagrams indicating all meters"
Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes

LEEDuser expert

Marcus Sheffer

7group / Energy Opportunities
LEED Fellow

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