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LEED v2009
Existing Building Operations
Materials and Resources
Solid Waste Management—Facility Alterations and Additions

LEED CREDIT

EBOM-2009 MRc9: Solid waste management - facility alterations and additions 1 point

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Credit achievement rate

XX%

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Barry Giles

BuildingWise LLC
Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BREEAM Fellow

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Credit language

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

Divert at least 70% of waste (by volume) generated by facility alterations and additions from disposal to landfills and incineration facilities. This applies only to base building elements permanently or semipermanently attached to the building itself that enter the waste stream during facility renovations, demolitions, refits and new construction additions. Base building elements include at a minimum, building components and structures (wall studs, insulation, doors, windows), panels, attached finishings (drywall, trim, ceiling panels), carpet and other flooring material, adhesives, sealants, paints and coatings. Furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building elements and are excluded from this credit. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators are also excluded.

See all forum discussions about this credit »

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Cost estimates for this credit

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Frequently asked questions

What if we don’t make any facility alterations or additions during our performance period? Is there anything we can do to capture this credit?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Which of the waste management credits covers mechanical, electrical and plumbing purchases? Do I include them in MRc9?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Why are we required to track materials in volume units?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

See all forum discussions about this credit »

Addenda

4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the second bulleted item, replace the text "MR Credit 2: Sustainable Purchasing - Durable Goods" with "MR Credit 2.1: Sustainable Purchasing - Electric-Powered Equipment" and, below as a new bulleted item, "MR Credit 2.2: Sustainable Purchasing - Furniture"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the last line of the first paragraph, replace the text "MR Credit 2: Sustainable Purchasing - Durable Goods" with "MR Credit 2.1: Sustainable Purchasing - Electric-Powered Equipment and MR Credit 2.2: Sustainable Purchasing - Furniture"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the second bulleted item, replace the text "MR Credit 2: Sustainable Purchasing - Durable Goods" with "MR Credit 2.1: Sustainable Purchasing - Electric-Powered Equipment" and, below as a new bulleted item, "MR Credit 2.2: Sustainable Purchasing - Furniture"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the last line of the first paragraph, replace the text "MR Credit 2: Sustainable Purchasing - Durable Goods" with "MR Credit 2.1: Sustainable Purchasing - Electric-Powered Equipment and MR Credit 2.2: Sustainable Purchasing - Furniture"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2005
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is located in Los Angeles, California. Construction waste is sorted at the jobsite into various boxes i.e. wood, metal, concrete/inert material, drywall/gypsum, co-mingled recycled waste (small wood scraps, wire cuttings, conduit, metal stud cut offs, etc.), and general trash boxes. A contracted hauler regularly collects these boxes. General trash is taken directly to the landfill where it is weighed and then buried. Separated recycling materials are taken to various certified City of Los Angeles recycling facilities where they are weighed and processed. Co-mingled recycled waste is taken to special certified recycling facilities where the co-mingled mix is weighed and then the recyclable materials are removed from the mix and sent to appropriate facilities for processing. This process does not allow for each recyclable material type from the co-mingled load to be weighed separately. The City of Los Angeles\' Department of Sanitation audits all of the co-mingled sorting facilities on a regular basis and establishes a yearly average recycling percentage rate for "each" facility. The certification recycling percentage rates vary. When calculating the construction waste recycling percentage for MRc2.1, will the USGBC accept the City of Los Angeles\' annual recycling percentage rate for the "specific" facility that accepts this LEED project\'s co-mingled component of the project\'s waste stream?

Ruling:

The average annual recycling rate for the specific sorting facility is acceptable as long as the facility\'s method of recording and calculating the recycling rate is regulated by a local or state government authority (as is the case for your project). Applicable Internationally.UPDATE 10/1/12: Made applicable to LEED EB 2008 and 2009.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can waste diversion rates be documented as an average recycling rate for an integrated waste management operation serving a market area as opposed to the average for a single facility?Does the USGBC offer a prescriptive method for facilities to back-up commingle recycling percentage claims? Is visual inspection of project loads an acceptable method for documenting recycling rates? When calculating recycling percentages the USGBC does not seem to have a limit on how much ADC can be claimed as a "recyclable" commodity.

Ruling:

A system recycling rate is acceptable as long, as the recycling rate utilized is regulated by a local or state government authority as a closed system, in compliance with the LEED-NC 2.1 CIR dated 12/2/2005 (#3000).For project using a project specific diversion rate, visual inspection is not an acceptable method of inspection for purposes of documenting percentage of commingled waste diverted from landfill. Currently ADC is an acceptable method for compliance with this credit. ADC meets the intent of MRc2. At this time there is no limit as to how much ADC can be used to fulfill credit compliance. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can project teams document Materials and Resources credit 9 in LEED-Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance v2008 by weight? All other solid waste management credit requirements in other version of LEED allow weight or volume.

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification of whether weight can be used as a metric for LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance version 2008 for Materials and Resources credit 9: Solid Waste Management- Facility Alterations and Additions. Yes, In order to be consistent with other Materials and Resources waste management credits, project teams may use either weight or volume as a metric for Materials and Resources credit 9: Solid Waste Management- Facility Alterations and Additions in both LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance version 2008 and LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance as long as the metric is applied consistently for all waste. For project teams pursuing this option note the metric in the "Special Circumstances" section of the credit form.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/29/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Methodology #1 Each co-mingled load of construction debris is weighted at the MRF and visually inspected then the percentage of each recyclable material is tallied. The recyclable materials are then processed for sale on the secondary market. The tallied data is documented in a running monthly report created by either the MRF or the Hauler and is submitted to the contractor for the project. Methodology #2 The MRF\'s self-reported recycling percentage rate (for the entire facility) is applied toward specific LEED projects\' delivered co-mingled tonnage brought to that facility. We are aware of the CIR ruling dated 12.2.05 stating that a project can use this methodology if a facility has government oversight over a facility\'s recycling rate calculations. In our case we have government oversight of the MRFs overall recovery rates but the reporting methodology required by the oversight agency doesn\'t account for C&D debris - asphalt, gypsum wallboard, and concrete tonnage which is processed through those facilities. LEED NC v2.2 accepts and credits concrete towards MRc2 but this disconnect between how the oversight agency tracks materials versus what is actually processed in a facility doesn\'t allow for accurate reporting and subsequent award of LEED credit in our local market. Please let us know if one or both methods are acceptable for tracking and documenting co-mingled boxes for MRc2.

Ruling:

This CIR asks if the USGBC can advise if one or both of two listed methods for documenting the recycled content of commingled waste are acceptable. In Methodology #1, if the facility is giving project specific recycling rates, they need to document actual percentage of material recycled based on actual weight or volume of material. Visual inspection is not an acceptable method. For "Methodology #2," the facility must be able to document that the "method of recording and calculating the recycling rate is regulated by a local or state government authority" in accordance with CIR dated 12/2/2005. If the facility\'s reported recycling rate is regulated by a local or state government, then it can be used toward achievement of the credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The proposed project site is located on a military base that has potentially unexploded ordnance on-site.Protection from potential detonation during construction is required by the federal government to shield pedestrians and existing housing across the street from the project site. As a part of the project, a detonation barrier is to be constructed prior to start of excavation. This barrier can be built using various material but must have substantial foundations and structural strength to withstand large explosion forces. After construction is completed, the detonation barriers would be deconstructed to allow access to the site.The project team is proposing to incorporate salvaged local material into the design of these barrier walls. May the salvaged material qualify for MR credit 2 Construction Waste Managementif recycled after deconstruction?

Ruling:

The project team has inquired whether materials used for a temporary (during construction) detonation barrier can be included within the construction waste management materials diverted since it is mandated to be built. If the temporary detonation barrier is recycled or salvaged after deconstruction, it meets the intent of MR Credit 2 (diversion from landfill and incineration) and may contribute towards construction waste management.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
See all forum discussions about this credit »

Checklists

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Documentation toolkit

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LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit is loaded with calculators to help assess credit compliance, tracking spreadsheets for materials, sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions, and examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects for you to check your work against. To get your plaque, start with the right toolkit.

Credit achievement rate

XX%

Upgrade to LEEDuser Premium to see how many projects achieved this credit. Try it free »

LEEDuser expert

Barry Giles

BuildingWise LLC
Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BREEAM Fellow

Get the inside scoop

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USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

Divert at least 70% of waste (by volume) generated by facility alterations and additions from disposal to landfills and incineration facilities. This applies only to base building elements permanently or semipermanently attached to the building itself that enter the waste stream during facility renovations, demolitions, refits and new construction additions. Base building elements include at a minimum, building components and structures (wall studs, insulation, doors, windows), panels, attached finishings (drywall, trim, ceiling panels), carpet and other flooring material, adhesives, sealants, paints and coatings. Furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building elements and are excluded from this credit. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators are also excluded.

XX%

Upgrade to LEEDuser Premium to see how many projects achieved this credit. Try it free »

Got the gist of MRc9 but not sure how to actually achieve it? LEEDuser gives step-by-step help. Premium members get:

  • Checklists covering all the key action steps you'll need to earn the credit.
  • Hot tips to give you shortcuts and avoid pitfalls.
  • Cost tips to assess what a credit will actually cost, and how to make it affordable.
  • Ideas for going beyond LEED with best practices.
  • All checklists organized by project phase.
  • On-the-fly suggestions of useful items from the Documentation Toolkit and Credit Language.

In the end, LEED is all about documentation. LEEDuser’s Documentation Toolkit, for premium members only, saves you time and helps you avoid mistakes with:

  • Calculators to help assess credit compliance.
  • Tracking spreadsheets for materials purchases.
  • Spreadsheets and forms to give to subs and other team members.
  • Guidance documents on arcane LEED issues.
  • Sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions.
  • Examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects.

What if we don’t make any facility alterations or additions during our performance period? Is there anything we can do to capture this credit?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Which of the waste management credits covers mechanical, electrical and plumbing purchases? Do I include them in MRc9?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Why are we required to track materials in volume units?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the second bulleted item, replace the text "MR Credit 2: Sustainable Purchasing - Durable Goods" with "MR Credit 2.1: Sustainable Purchasing - Electric-Powered Equipment" and, below as a new bulleted item, "MR Credit 2.2: Sustainable Purchasing - Furniture"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the last line of the first paragraph, replace the text "MR Credit 2: Sustainable Purchasing - Durable Goods" with "MR Credit 2.1: Sustainable Purchasing - Electric-Powered Equipment and MR Credit 2.2: Sustainable Purchasing - Furniture"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the second bulleted item, replace the text "MR Credit 2: Sustainable Purchasing - Durable Goods" with "MR Credit 2.1: Sustainable Purchasing - Electric-Powered Equipment" and, below as a new bulleted item, "MR Credit 2.2: Sustainable Purchasing - Furniture"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the last line of the first paragraph, replace the text "MR Credit 2: Sustainable Purchasing - Durable Goods" with "MR Credit 2.1: Sustainable Purchasing - Electric-Powered Equipment and MR Credit 2.2: Sustainable Purchasing - Furniture"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2005
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is located in Los Angeles, California. Construction waste is sorted at the jobsite into various boxes i.e. wood, metal, concrete/inert material, drywall/gypsum, co-mingled recycled waste (small wood scraps, wire cuttings, conduit, metal stud cut offs, etc.), and general trash boxes. A contracted hauler regularly collects these boxes. General trash is taken directly to the landfill where it is weighed and then buried. Separated recycling materials are taken to various certified City of Los Angeles recycling facilities where they are weighed and processed. Co-mingled recycled waste is taken to special certified recycling facilities where the co-mingled mix is weighed and then the recyclable materials are removed from the mix and sent to appropriate facilities for processing. This process does not allow for each recyclable material type from the co-mingled load to be weighed separately. The City of Los Angeles\' Department of Sanitation audits all of the co-mingled sorting facilities on a regular basis and establishes a yearly average recycling percentage rate for "each" facility. The certification recycling percentage rates vary. When calculating the construction waste recycling percentage for MRc2.1, will the USGBC accept the City of Los Angeles\' annual recycling percentage rate for the "specific" facility that accepts this LEED project\'s co-mingled component of the project\'s waste stream?

Ruling:

The average annual recycling rate for the specific sorting facility is acceptable as long as the facility\'s method of recording and calculating the recycling rate is regulated by a local or state government authority (as is the case for your project). Applicable Internationally.UPDATE 10/1/12: Made applicable to LEED EB 2008 and 2009.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can waste diversion rates be documented as an average recycling rate for an integrated waste management operation serving a market area as opposed to the average for a single facility?Does the USGBC offer a prescriptive method for facilities to back-up commingle recycling percentage claims? Is visual inspection of project loads an acceptable method for documenting recycling rates? When calculating recycling percentages the USGBC does not seem to have a limit on how much ADC can be claimed as a "recyclable" commodity.

Ruling:

A system recycling rate is acceptable as long, as the recycling rate utilized is regulated by a local or state government authority as a closed system, in compliance with the LEED-NC 2.1 CIR dated 12/2/2005 (#3000).For project using a project specific diversion rate, visual inspection is not an acceptable method of inspection for purposes of documenting percentage of commingled waste diverted from landfill. Currently ADC is an acceptable method for compliance with this credit. ADC meets the intent of MRc2. At this time there is no limit as to how much ADC can be used to fulfill credit compliance. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can project teams document Materials and Resources credit 9 in LEED-Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance v2008 by weight? All other solid waste management credit requirements in other version of LEED allow weight or volume.

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification of whether weight can be used as a metric for LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance version 2008 for Materials and Resources credit 9: Solid Waste Management- Facility Alterations and Additions. Yes, In order to be consistent with other Materials and Resources waste management credits, project teams may use either weight or volume as a metric for Materials and Resources credit 9: Solid Waste Management- Facility Alterations and Additions in both LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance version 2008 and LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance as long as the metric is applied consistently for all waste. For project teams pursuing this option note the metric in the "Special Circumstances" section of the credit form.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/29/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Methodology #1 Each co-mingled load of construction debris is weighted at the MRF and visually inspected then the percentage of each recyclable material is tallied. The recyclable materials are then processed for sale on the secondary market. The tallied data is documented in a running monthly report created by either the MRF or the Hauler and is submitted to the contractor for the project. Methodology #2 The MRF\'s self-reported recycling percentage rate (for the entire facility) is applied toward specific LEED projects\' delivered co-mingled tonnage brought to that facility. We are aware of the CIR ruling dated 12.2.05 stating that a project can use this methodology if a facility has government oversight over a facility\'s recycling rate calculations. In our case we have government oversight of the MRFs overall recovery rates but the reporting methodology required by the oversight agency doesn\'t account for C&D debris - asphalt, gypsum wallboard, and concrete tonnage which is processed through those facilities. LEED NC v2.2 accepts and credits concrete towards MRc2 but this disconnect between how the oversight agency tracks materials versus what is actually processed in a facility doesn\'t allow for accurate reporting and subsequent award of LEED credit in our local market. Please let us know if one or both methods are acceptable for tracking and documenting co-mingled boxes for MRc2.

Ruling:

This CIR asks if the USGBC can advise if one or both of two listed methods for documenting the recycled content of commingled waste are acceptable. In Methodology #1, if the facility is giving project specific recycling rates, they need to document actual percentage of material recycled based on actual weight or volume of material. Visual inspection is not an acceptable method. For "Methodology #2," the facility must be able to document that the "method of recording and calculating the recycling rate is regulated by a local or state government authority" in accordance with CIR dated 12/2/2005. If the facility\'s reported recycling rate is regulated by a local or state government, then it can be used toward achievement of the credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The proposed project site is located on a military base that has potentially unexploded ordnance on-site.Protection from potential detonation during construction is required by the federal government to shield pedestrians and existing housing across the street from the project site. As a part of the project, a detonation barrier is to be constructed prior to start of excavation. This barrier can be built using various material but must have substantial foundations and structural strength to withstand large explosion forces. After construction is completed, the detonation barriers would be deconstructed to allow access to the site.The project team is proposing to incorporate salvaged local material into the design of these barrier walls. May the salvaged material qualify for MR credit 2 Construction Waste Managementif recycled after deconstruction?

Ruling:

The project team has inquired whether materials used for a temporary (during construction) detonation barrier can be included within the construction waste management materials diverted since it is mandated to be built. If the temporary detonation barrier is recycled or salvaged after deconstruction, it meets the intent of MR Credit 2 (diversion from landfill and incineration) and may contribute towards construction waste management.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No

LEEDuser expert

Barry Giles

BuildingWise LLC
Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BREEAM Fellow

See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Unsubscribe from discussions about EBOM-2009 MRc9