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LEED v2009
Existing Building Operations
Materials and Resources
Sustainable Purchasing—Facility Alterations and Additions

LEED CREDIT

EBOM-2009 MRc3: Sustainable purchasing - facility alterations and additions 1 point

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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

Maintain a sustainable purchasing program covering materials for facility renovations, demolitions, refits and new construction additions. This applies only to base building elements1 permanently or semipermanently attached to the building itself. Materials considered furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building elements and are excluded from this credit. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators are also excluded from this credit. A sample calculaton for this credit is available in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Achieve sustainable purchases of 50% of total purchases (by cost) during the performance period. Sustainable purchases shall meet 1 or more of the following criteria:

  • Purchases contain at least 10% postconsumer and/or 20% postindustrial material.
  • Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from off-site or outside the organization.
  • Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from on-site, through an internal organization materials and equipment reuse program.
  • Purchases contain at least 50% rapidly renewable material.
  • Purchases contain at least 50% Forest Stewardship Council certified wood.
  • Purchases contain at least 50% material harvested and processed or extracted and processed within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) radius of the project. Building materials or products shipped by rail or water have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) total travel distance of the project site using a weighted average determined through the following formula: (Distance by rail/3) + (Distance by inland waterway/2) + (Distance by sea/15) + (Distance by all other means) ≤ 500 miles [800 kilometers]
  • Adhesives and sealants have a VOC content less than the current VOC content limits of South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule #1168, or sealants used as fillers meet or exceed the requirements of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District Regulation 8, Rule 51.
  • Paints and coating have VOC emissions not exceeding the VOC and chemical component limits of Green Seal’s Standard GS-11 requirements.
  • Noncarpet finished flooring meets one of the following requirements and constitutes a minimum of 25% of the finished floor area:
    • Is FloorScore certified
    • Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice.
    • Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:
      • California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point
      • Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than ½ of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points. If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7.
  • Carpet meets one of the following requirements:
    • Meets CRI Green Label Plus Carpet Testing Program
    • Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice. The additional VOC concentration limits listed in Section 9.1a must also be met
    • Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:
      • California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point
      • Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test result obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than ½ of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points. If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7.
  • Carpet cushion meets the requirements of the CRI Green Label Testing Program.
  • Composite panels and agrifiber2 products contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins.
Each purchase can receive credit for each sustainable criterion met (i.e., a $100 purchase that contains both 10% postconsumer recycled content and 50% of content harvested within 500 miles of the project counts twice in the calculation, for a total of $200 of sustainable purchasing). Materials for alterations or additions must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

Pilot Alternative Compliance Path Available

The following pilot alternative compliance path is available for this credit. See the pilot credit library for more information. MRpc102 - Legal Wood
See all forum discussions about this credit »

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Cost estimates for this credit

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Frequently asked questions

What if we don’t make any facility alterations or additions during our performance period? Is there anything we can do to earn this credit?

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What kind of construction or renovation activities count as a facility alteration or addition? We had the building interior painted, does that count?

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Which of the purchasing credits covers mechanical, electrical and plumbing purchases? Do I include them in MRc3?

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Can I use the LEED-NC default of 25% recycled content for steel in our facility alterations and additions purchases?

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Addenda

6/15/2016Updated: 6/15/2016
Form Update
Description of change:
updated incorrect formulas in MRc1, MRc2.2 and MRc3 tabs
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/15/2016Updated: 4/7/2016
Form Update
Description of change:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The third new indented bullet should read: "Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The first new indented bullet should read: "California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The first new indented bullet should read: "Meets CRI Green Label Plus Carpet Testing Program"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Add three new bullets, indented, after the 9th bullet:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The third new indented bullet should read: "Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/1/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Under "Carpet and Rug Institute (RCI) Green Label Plus Testing Program, replace "http://www.carpet-rug.com" with "http://www.carpet-rug.org."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The 6th bullet should read: "Purchases contain at least 50% material harvested and processed or extracted and processed within a 500 miles (800 kilometers) radius of the project. Building materials or products shipped by rail or water have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) total travel distance of the project site using a weighted average determined through the following formula: (Distance by rail/3) + (Distance by inland waterway/2) + (Distance by sea/15) + (Distance by all other means) ? 500 miles [800 kilometers]"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The second new indented bullet should read: "Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than 1/2 of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points. If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Add three new bullets, indented, after the 10th bullet:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Add two new bullets, indented further, after the third new indented bullet:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The second new indented bullet should read: "Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than 1/2 of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points. If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The second new indented bullet should read: "Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice. The additional VOC concentration limits listed in Section 9.1a must also be met"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The first new indented bullet should read: "Is FloorScore-certified."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Add two new bullets, indented further, after the third new indented bullet:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/1/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the definition of "chain-of-custody (COC)" with "the path taken by raw materials, processed materials, and products from the forest to the consumer, including all successive stages of processing, transformation, manufacturing and distribution. A chain-of-custody certificate number on invoices for nonlabeled products indicates that the certifier's guidelines for product accounting have been followed. A chain-of-custody certification is not required by distributors of a product that is individually labeled with the Forest Stewardship Council logo and manufacturer's chain-of-custody number. Chain of Custody (CoC) certification requirements are determined by Forest Stewardship Council Chain of Custody Standard 40-004 v2-1."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The 9th bullet should read: Noncarpet finished flooring meets one of the following requirements and constitutes a minimum of 25% of the finished floor area:"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Delete the Alternative Compliance Path for Projects Outside the U.S.
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/1/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the definition of "volatile organic compounds (VOC's)" with "a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The second new indented bullet should read: "Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The first new indented bullet should read: "California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The tenth original bullet should read: "Carpet meets one of the following requirements:"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/2/2014
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Please provide clarification on documentation of recycled content claims and FSC certified claims for woods products such as particleboard, MDF and other composites.

Ruling:

The project team in inquiring how to document products with valid recycled content claims as well as FSC certification. Products identified as FSC Mix Credit or FSC Mix [NN] % also have pre- or post-consumer recycled content, the latter of which is commonly reported separately by the product manufacturer. In these instances the project team must choose whether to classify the product (or some fraction of the assembly) as FSC certified or as recycled content; the material cannot contribute to both claims simultaneously. Specifically claims may be made under either MRc4: Recycled Content, or MRc7: Certified Wood. Note that for recycled content claims the material must meet the definition of ISO 14021 as required by LEED.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

How do you account for previously exposed structures that are finished as part of the project?

Ruling:

Components contributing to MRc1.2 include finished ceilings, walls, doors, flooring, and built-in case goods. Components should be divided into 3 categories for calculation: Prior Condition, Completed Design, and Retained Components Area. Prior Condition includes the total finished area that existed before the project began, Completed Design in the total finished area in the completed design (including all new and retained elements), and Retained Components Area is the area of components listed above that were in the space under both Prior Condition and Completed Design. Previously exposed elements that were finished as part of the project should not be counted in the Retained Components Area since the original element was altered/added to during construction. For example, an unfinished ceiling covered with a lay-in ceiling after construction would not be able to contribute to credit. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/15/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is an electronics manufacturing facility. In order to reduce the impact to indoor air quality and improve the working environment of the employees, we are in the process of switching to more IAQ friendly building-related products such as carpet, paints, coating, sealants, etc, which helps us pursue MRc3. Further more, during the manufacturing process we have reduced VOCs as much as we can without affecting product quality. We also have procedures and policies in place to continually strive for further reductions as they become available, and have the correct engineering controls to prevent air contamination inside the building. Although LEED does not directly address process-related materials and substances, we think these are the proper things to do in order to provide a better environment for the building occupants. However, at this point, we do use several products that contain VOCs (conformal coating and solvents mostly) but we have significantly reduced VOC amounts (>75%) through chemical substitutions and process eliminations. Those VOCs we do still have are used in areas with proper ventilation (such as fume hoods or inside enclosed and vented equipment) to ensure minimal exposure to employees and immediate venting to the outside of the building. Our 3rd party industrial hygiene survey results prove that the VOC exposure levels for employees are extremely low (

Ruling:

MRc3 products only address building materials covered by the five MRc3 IAQ compliant sustainability criteria that are used for building improvements, including but not limited upgrades, retrofits, renovations or modifications, inside the building. Manufacturing process-related materials are not addressed by LEED-EB MRc3. Significantly reduced manufacturing process-related VOC amounts through chemical substitutions and process eliminations would best be documented through a LEED-EBv2.0 innovation credit. Innovation points may be awarded for programs or actions that provide additional environmental benefits beyond those already addressed by the LEED-EB credits and prerequisites. Documentation submittals must include a narrative that includes at a minimum: 1. A complete description of the strategy and/or achievement that fully defines the extra sustainability operations & maintenance practices taken by the project team. 2. A clear explanation of the additional environmental benefits delivered by the measure over the performance period and how the team\'s actions caused them to occur. 3. A definition of the performance metrics that quantify the extra environmental benefits, and the corresponding amount of benefits delivered over the performance period because of the team\'s actions. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/26/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

How does a project team classify duct sealants for application under EQc4.1?

Ruling:

Project teams may classify duct sealants under "Other", as listed in the SCAQMD VOC Limits table. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/17/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

In designing a project for LEED certification, we are planning to specify linoleum sheet flooring in areas of the building. We are requesting that a credit be awarded to this project under LEED EB MRc3 as the flooring will meet VOC emissions requirements of the FloorScore certification program which has more stringent requirements than those required to receive a credit under the CRI Green Label or Green Label Plus programs. We believe that all flooring materials in a building, not just carpet, should have an opportunity to receive credit for meeting stringent VOC emissions requirements. FloorScore is a voluntary, independent certification program that tests and certifies hard surface flooring and associated products for compliance with criteria adopted in California for indoor air emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) with potential health effects. The program uses a small-scale chamber test protocol and incorporates VOC emissions criteria developed by the California Department of Health Services, which are widely known as Section 1350. The FloorScore program was developed by the Resilient Floor Covering Institute (RFCI) in collaboration with Scientific Certification Systems (SCS) following several years of extensive testing of flooring products produced by resilient flooring manufacturers. The program incorporates California Section 1350 procedures and requirements and adapts them to the certification of flooring products for use in typical buildings. RFCI controls the FloorScore program name and logo. SCS acts as the third-party certifier ensuring program integrity and independence. As part of certification, SCS (1) works with the manufacturer to identify the appropriate samples for testing; (2) reviews VOC emission test reports generated by independent testing laboratories for individual candidate products; (3) determines if the test results meet the California Section 1350 requirements for individual VOCs of concern; and (4) periodically inspects manufacturing plants to review product formulas, processing, and quality control in order to define the permitted use of the FloorScore seal. The basis of the VOC criteria used for FloorScore certification is the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) which has an active program to develop chronic toxicity guidelines for air pollutants. The program uses widely accepted procedures developed by the U.S. EPA and includes extensive peer review and public comment. To date, the program has developed Chronic Reference Exposure Levels (CRELS) for 78 chemical substances. The CRELS are concentrations that assume long-term exposures and include a number of uncertainty factors. These guidelines provide a strong scientific basis for the FloorScore program and are consistent with the intent of MRc3 to "reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, potentially irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants."

Ruling:

Yes, the proposed alternative compliance path using FloorScore is acceptable for credit achievement according to the following stipulations. 100% of the non-carpet finished flooring must be FloorScore-certified (as described above), and it must comprise, at minimum, at least 25% of the finished floor area. Potential examples of unfinished flooring include floors in mechanical rooms, electrical rooms, and elevator service rooms. This ruling was justified by the technical committee\'s evaluation of the technical resources used as basis for the standard (California and USEPA sources), and adequate benefit. This CIR went through an official USGBC process for the establishment of performance/intent-equivalent alternative compliance paths. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
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Integrated Design & LEED Specialist

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Requirements

Maintain a sustainable purchasing program covering materials for facility renovations, demolitions, refits and new construction additions. This applies only to base building elements1 permanently or semipermanently attached to the building itself. Materials considered furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building elements and are excluded from this credit. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators are also excluded from this credit. A sample calculaton for this credit is available in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Achieve sustainable purchases of 50% of total purchases (by cost) during the performance period. Sustainable purchases shall meet 1 or more of the following criteria:

  • Purchases contain at least 10% postconsumer and/or 20% postindustrial material.
  • Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from off-site or outside the organization.
  • Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from on-site, through an internal organization materials and equipment reuse program.
  • Purchases contain at least 50% rapidly renewable material.
  • Purchases contain at least 50% Forest Stewardship Council certified wood.
  • Purchases contain at least 50% material harvested and processed or extracted and processed within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) radius of the project. Building materials or products shipped by rail or water have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) total travel distance of the project site using a weighted average determined through the following formula: (Distance by rail/3) + (Distance by inland waterway/2) + (Distance by sea/15) + (Distance by all other means) ≤ 500 miles [800 kilometers]
  • Adhesives and sealants have a VOC content less than the current VOC content limits of South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule #1168, or sealants used as fillers meet or exceed the requirements of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District Regulation 8, Rule 51.
  • Paints and coating have VOC emissions not exceeding the VOC and chemical component limits of Green Seal’s Standard GS-11 requirements.
  • Noncarpet finished flooring meets one of the following requirements and constitutes a minimum of 25% of the finished floor area:
    • Is FloorScore certified
    • Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice.
    • Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:
      • California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point
      • Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than ½ of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points. If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7.
  • Carpet meets one of the following requirements:
    • Meets CRI Green Label Plus Carpet Testing Program
    • Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice. The additional VOC concentration limits listed in Section 9.1a must also be met
    • Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:
      • California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point
      • Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test result obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than ½ of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points. If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7.
  • Carpet cushion meets the requirements of the CRI Green Label Testing Program.
  • Composite panels and agrifiber2 products contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins.
Each purchase can receive credit for each sustainable criterion met (i.e., a $100 purchase that contains both 10% postconsumer recycled content and 50% of content harvested within 500 miles of the project counts twice in the calculation, for a total of $200 of sustainable purchasing). Materials for alterations or additions must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

Pilot Alternative Compliance Path Available

The following pilot alternative compliance path is available for this credit. See the pilot credit library for more information. MRpc102 - Legal Wood

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What if we don’t make any facility alterations or additions during our performance period? Is there anything we can do to earn this credit?

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What kind of construction or renovation activities count as a facility alteration or addition? We had the building interior painted, does that count?

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Which of the purchasing credits covers mechanical, electrical and plumbing purchases? Do I include them in MRc3?

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Can I use the LEED-NC default of 25% recycled content for steel in our facility alterations and additions purchases?

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6/15/2016Updated: 6/15/2016
Form Update
Description of change:
updated incorrect formulas in MRc1, MRc2.2 and MRc3 tabs
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
1/15/2016Updated: 4/7/2016
Form Update
Description of change:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The third new indented bullet should read: "Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The first new indented bullet should read: "California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The first new indented bullet should read: "Meets CRI Green Label Plus Carpet Testing Program"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Add three new bullets, indented, after the 9th bullet:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The third new indented bullet should read: "Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/1/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Under "Carpet and Rug Institute (RCI) Green Label Plus Testing Program, replace "http://www.carpet-rug.com" with "http://www.carpet-rug.org."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The 6th bullet should read: "Purchases contain at least 50% material harvested and processed or extracted and processed within a 500 miles (800 kilometers) radius of the project. Building materials or products shipped by rail or water have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) total travel distance of the project site using a weighted average determined through the following formula: (Distance by rail/3) + (Distance by inland waterway/2) + (Distance by sea/15) + (Distance by all other means) ? 500 miles [800 kilometers]"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The second new indented bullet should read: "Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than 1/2 of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points. If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Add three new bullets, indented, after the 10th bullet:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Add two new bullets, indented further, after the third new indented bullet:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The second new indented bullet should read: "Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than 1/2 of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points. If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The second new indented bullet should read: "Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice. The additional VOC concentration limits listed in Section 9.1a must also be met"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The first new indented bullet should read: "Is FloorScore-certified."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Add two new bullets, indented further, after the third new indented bullet:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/1/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the definition of "chain-of-custody (COC)" with "the path taken by raw materials, processed materials, and products from the forest to the consumer, including all successive stages of processing, transformation, manufacturing and distribution. A chain-of-custody certificate number on invoices for nonlabeled products indicates that the certifier's guidelines for product accounting have been followed. A chain-of-custody certification is not required by distributors of a product that is individually labeled with the Forest Stewardship Council logo and manufacturer's chain-of-custody number. Chain of Custody (CoC) certification requirements are determined by Forest Stewardship Council Chain of Custody Standard 40-004 v2-1."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The 9th bullet should read: Noncarpet finished flooring meets one of the following requirements and constitutes a minimum of 25% of the finished floor area:"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
Delete the Alternative Compliance Path for Projects Outside the U.S.
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/1/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the definition of "volatile organic compounds (VOC's)" with "a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The second new indented bullet should read: "Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The first new indented bullet should read: "California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/6/2012Updated: 2/14/2015
Global ACP
Description of change:
The tenth original bullet should read: "Carpet meets one of the following requirements:"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/2/2014
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Please provide clarification on documentation of recycled content claims and FSC certified claims for woods products such as particleboard, MDF and other composites.

Ruling:

The project team in inquiring how to document products with valid recycled content claims as well as FSC certification. Products identified as FSC Mix Credit or FSC Mix [NN] % also have pre- or post-consumer recycled content, the latter of which is commonly reported separately by the product manufacturer. In these instances the project team must choose whether to classify the product (or some fraction of the assembly) as FSC certified or as recycled content; the material cannot contribute to both claims simultaneously. Specifically claims may be made under either MRc4: Recycled Content, or MRc7: Certified Wood. Note that for recycled content claims the material must meet the definition of ISO 14021 as required by LEED.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

How do you account for previously exposed structures that are finished as part of the project?

Ruling:

Components contributing to MRc1.2 include finished ceilings, walls, doors, flooring, and built-in case goods. Components should be divided into 3 categories for calculation: Prior Condition, Completed Design, and Retained Components Area. Prior Condition includes the total finished area that existed before the project began, Completed Design in the total finished area in the completed design (including all new and retained elements), and Retained Components Area is the area of components listed above that were in the space under both Prior Condition and Completed Design. Previously exposed elements that were finished as part of the project should not be counted in the Retained Components Area since the original element was altered/added to during construction. For example, an unfinished ceiling covered with a lay-in ceiling after construction would not be able to contribute to credit. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/15/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is an electronics manufacturing facility. In order to reduce the impact to indoor air quality and improve the working environment of the employees, we are in the process of switching to more IAQ friendly building-related products such as carpet, paints, coating, sealants, etc, which helps us pursue MRc3. Further more, during the manufacturing process we have reduced VOCs as much as we can without affecting product quality. We also have procedures and policies in place to continually strive for further reductions as they become available, and have the correct engineering controls to prevent air contamination inside the building. Although LEED does not directly address process-related materials and substances, we think these are the proper things to do in order to provide a better environment for the building occupants. However, at this point, we do use several products that contain VOCs (conformal coating and solvents mostly) but we have significantly reduced VOC amounts (>75%) through chemical substitutions and process eliminations. Those VOCs we do still have are used in areas with proper ventilation (such as fume hoods or inside enclosed and vented equipment) to ensure minimal exposure to employees and immediate venting to the outside of the building. Our 3rd party industrial hygiene survey results prove that the VOC exposure levels for employees are extremely low (

Ruling:

MRc3 products only address building materials covered by the five MRc3 IAQ compliant sustainability criteria that are used for building improvements, including but not limited upgrades, retrofits, renovations or modifications, inside the building. Manufacturing process-related materials are not addressed by LEED-EB MRc3. Significantly reduced manufacturing process-related VOC amounts through chemical substitutions and process eliminations would best be documented through a LEED-EBv2.0 innovation credit. Innovation points may be awarded for programs or actions that provide additional environmental benefits beyond those already addressed by the LEED-EB credits and prerequisites. Documentation submittals must include a narrative that includes at a minimum: 1. A complete description of the strategy and/or achievement that fully defines the extra sustainability operations & maintenance practices taken by the project team. 2. A clear explanation of the additional environmental benefits delivered by the measure over the performance period and how the team\'s actions caused them to occur. 3. A definition of the performance metrics that quantify the extra environmental benefits, and the corresponding amount of benefits delivered over the performance period because of the team\'s actions. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/26/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

How does a project team classify duct sealants for application under EQc4.1?

Ruling:

Project teams may classify duct sealants under "Other", as listed in the SCAQMD VOC Limits table. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/17/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

In designing a project for LEED certification, we are planning to specify linoleum sheet flooring in areas of the building. We are requesting that a credit be awarded to this project under LEED EB MRc3 as the flooring will meet VOC emissions requirements of the FloorScore certification program which has more stringent requirements than those required to receive a credit under the CRI Green Label or Green Label Plus programs. We believe that all flooring materials in a building, not just carpet, should have an opportunity to receive credit for meeting stringent VOC emissions requirements. FloorScore is a voluntary, independent certification program that tests and certifies hard surface flooring and associated products for compliance with criteria adopted in California for indoor air emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) with potential health effects. The program uses a small-scale chamber test protocol and incorporates VOC emissions criteria developed by the California Department of Health Services, which are widely known as Section 1350. The FloorScore program was developed by the Resilient Floor Covering Institute (RFCI) in collaboration with Scientific Certification Systems (SCS) following several years of extensive testing of flooring products produced by resilient flooring manufacturers. The program incorporates California Section 1350 procedures and requirements and adapts them to the certification of flooring products for use in typical buildings. RFCI controls the FloorScore program name and logo. SCS acts as the third-party certifier ensuring program integrity and independence. As part of certification, SCS (1) works with the manufacturer to identify the appropriate samples for testing; (2) reviews VOC emission test reports generated by independent testing laboratories for individual candidate products; (3) determines if the test results meet the California Section 1350 requirements for individual VOCs of concern; and (4) periodically inspects manufacturing plants to review product formulas, processing, and quality control in order to define the permitted use of the FloorScore seal. The basis of the VOC criteria used for FloorScore certification is the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) which has an active program to develop chronic toxicity guidelines for air pollutants. The program uses widely accepted procedures developed by the U.S. EPA and includes extensive peer review and public comment. To date, the program has developed Chronic Reference Exposure Levels (CRELS) for 78 chemical substances. The CRELS are concentrations that assume long-term exposures and include a number of uncertainty factors. These guidelines provide a strong scientific basis for the FloorScore program and are consistent with the intent of MRc3 to "reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, potentially irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants."

Ruling:

Yes, the proposed alternative compliance path using FloorScore is acceptable for credit achievement according to the following stipulations. 100% of the non-carpet finished flooring must be FloorScore-certified (as described above), and it must comprise, at minimum, at least 25% of the finished floor area. Potential examples of unfinished flooring include floors in mechanical rooms, electrical rooms, and elevator service rooms. This ruling was justified by the technical committee\'s evaluation of the technical resources used as basis for the standard (California and USEPA sources), and adequate benefit. This CIR went through an official USGBC process for the establishment of performance/intent-equivalent alternative compliance paths. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes

LEEDuser expert

David Posada

M. Arch, LEED AP+Homes, CPHC

SERA Architects
Integrated Design & LEED Specialist

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