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LEED v2009
Existing Building Operations
Innovation in Operations

Innovation in Operations

LEED CREDIT

EBOM-2009 IOc1: Innovation in Operations 1-4 points

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Credit language

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Requirements

Credit can be achieved through any combination of the Innovation in Design/Operations and Exemplary Performance paths as described below:

Path 1. Innovation in operations (1-4 points)
Achieve significant, measurable environmental performance using an operations, maintenance or system upgrade strategy not addressed in the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance Rating System. One point is awarded for each innovation achieved. No more than 4 points under IOc1 may be earned through Path 1—Innovation in operations. Identify following in writing:
  • The intent of the proposed innovation credit
  • The additional environmental benefits delivered
  • The proposed requirements for compliance
  • The proposed performance metrics to demonstrate compliance and the approaches (strategies) used to meet the requirements
  • The proposed requirements met during the performance period
Path 2. Exemplary performance (1-3 points)
Achieve exemplary performance in an existing LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance prerequisite or credit that allows exemplary performance as specified in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. An exemplary performance point may be earned for achieving double the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold of an existing credit in LEED. One point is awarded for each exemplary performance achieved. No more than 3 points under IOc1 may be earned through Path 2—Exemplary performance.
Path 3. Pilot credit (1-4 points)
Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library at www.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant and complete the required documentation. Projects may pursue up to 4 Pilot Credits total. See all forum discussions about this credit »

What does it cost?

Cost estimates for this credit

On each BD+C v4 credit, LEEDuser offers the wisdom of a team of architects, engineers, cost estimators, and LEED experts with hundreds of LEED projects between then. They analyzed the sustainable design strategies associated with each LEED credit, but also to assign actual costs to those strategies.

Our tab contains overall cost guidance, notes on what “soft costs” to expect, and a strategy-by-strategy breakdown of what to consider and what it might cost, in percentage premiums, actual costs, or both.

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Frequently asked questions

We achieved exemplary performance for more than three credits. Can we claim more than three points under IOc1?

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We didn’t claim one of our credits as an exemplary performance point under IOc1 during the preliminary review, but now we’d like to because it earned exemplary performance per the review comments. Is it possible to claim it now?

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We have an idea for an innovation credit, but we’d like to get input on whether the strategy has merit before we attempt it. What should we do?

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Addenda

2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the header, change "(1 point)" to "(1 - 4 Points)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the second line of the second paragraph, replace "IDc1" with "IOc1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Replace the last sentence of the paragraph with "Projects may pursue up to 4 Pilot Credits total."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the second line of the second paragraph, replace "IDc1" with "IOc1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the last sentence of the paragraph with "Projects may pursue up to 4 Pilot Credits total."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the first line of the second paragraph, replace "IDc1" with "IOc1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Below the text of the "PATH 2" section text, insert the following section:Path 3. Pilot Credit (1 point)Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library atwww.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant andcomplete the required documentation. Projects may pursue more than 1pilot credit; however, a maximum of 1 point will be awarded.(Please note that this section was updated on Februrary 2, 2011).
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the first line of the second paragraph, replace "IDc1" with "IOc1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the header, change "(1 point)" to "(1 - 4 Points)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Below the text of the "PATH 2" section text, insert the following section:Path 3. Pilot Credit (1 point)Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library atwww.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant andcomplete the required documentation. Projects may pursue more than 1pilot credit; however, a maximum of 1 point will be awarded.(Please note that this section was updated on Februrary 2, 2011).
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
5/25/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Taylor 28 is a mixed-use project that includes multi-family residential over ground floor retail with underground parking in addition to outdoor plazas and courtyard spaces. The project is located in downtown Seattle, Washington. The project has three above-grade, podium level courtyards that are composed of concrete pavers, raised planting areas, and a small amount of wood decking (ipe). The project has strong design intent focused on minimizing the heat island effect and thus is pursuing and will likely achieve the Sustainable Sites credits for Heat Island Effect for Non-Roof (SSc7.1) and Roof (SSc7.2). We believe the project also satisfies the intent of the Exemplary Performance pathway for Heat Island Effect Non-Roof since 100% of the parking is underground. However, we are confused about how best to demonstrate that accomplishment due to the complexity of our project, contribution of multiple strategies, and imprecise language in the reference guide. Please provide clarification on how to document this credit, given the circumstances described. Even though the roof already satisfies the criteria for SSc7.2 Heat Island Effect, Roof, the roof is reexamined in determining compliance with the Exemplary Performance pathway for SSc7.1 since portions cover the underground parking. As previously mentioned, the project will easily achieve the 50% threshold for SSc7.1, by either or both of the available options. However in order to achieve the SSc7.1 Exemplary Performance threshold of 100%, it seems the project is required to demonstrate that any portion of roof that covers parking has a minimum solar reflectance index (SRI) of 29. We believe that the project satisfies the intent of the credit but is having trouble matching the circumstances of the project to the submittal requirements. As you will read below, only by the strictest definition of the requirements, does the project fail to satisfy the requirements. The following four ways demonstrate both in isolation and in cooperation why our project should be awarded full credit for the Exemplary Performance for SSc7.1: 1. Area-weighted Average SRI - The area-weighted average SRI value for surfaces that are above underground parking is 75, which is composed of the following three elements: a. Roof - White TPO membrane, SRI = 82, Area over parking = 36,483 sf b. Courtyard - Concrete pavers, SRI = 40, Area over parking = 4,742 sf c. Courtyard - Ipe decking, SRI = 27, Area over parking = 1,634 sf The area of vegetation and a corresponding SRI is excluded from the Area-weighted Average SRI. However, it is worth noting that vegetation on the courtyards covers 4,535 sf (9.5%) and further reduces the heat island effect and would increase the average SRI if vegetation could be valued using the SRI metric. The percentage of the total area covering underground parking for each of the four materials is as follows: a. Roof - White TPO membrane, percentage of total roof area: 77% b. Courtyard - Concrete pavers, percentage of total roof area: 10% c. Courtyard - Vegetation, percentage of total roof area: 9.5% d. Courtyard - Ipe decking - percentage of total roof area: 3.5% 2. Shading: The three podium-level courtyards are located one story above street level and are significantly shaded by five levels of residential units that surround them. Due to this, the courtyards are further mitigated from any heat island effect by shading. In fact, using the LEED prescribed shading calculations (qualifying area shaded is the average of areas shaded at 10 a.m., noon, and 3 p.m. on the solstice), even though they only technically apply to the Option 1 compliance path, demonstrates that shade from the building will cover 47 % of the total courtyard area, and 51% of the total wood decking area. This further reduces the influence of the wood decking in contributing to the heat island effect. In addition, tree plantings in the larger courtyard will also contribute to shading of the pavement. 3. The LEED-NC Reference Guide gives an explicit definition of what qualifies a project for the Exemplary Performance Pathway for SSc7.1, "Project may be awarded an innovation point for exemplary performance by demonstrating that.2) 100% of the on-site parking spaces have been located under cover". There is no mention of the requirement that "Any roof used to shade or cover parking must have an SRI of at least 29" as is mentioned in the credit language. Furthermore, the roof in question was not merely put in place as a parking shade, but instead to cover the building, which is already included in SSc7.2 Heat Island Effect, Roof, which this project is already achieving. 4. Amenity Space: The project is sited in a dense urban area, where residential development is part of a strategy to create vibrant neighborhoods. In creating such communities, it is important to provide outdoor amenity spaces for the residents that allow for a respite from the hectic pace of urban life. These courtyards provide simple outdoor gathering spaces comprised of a variety of materials which allow residents to relax in a visually rich outdoor space within the harsher city environment. As a footnote, the Ipe wood decking in question was sent for testing at a laboratory, at a not insignificant cost, to determine its actual SRI value and its impact on the heat island effect. Since new Ipe decking has very different properties than Ipe decking that is a few years old due to the effect of weathering (the brownish wood weathers to a silvery gray over time), a partially-weathered sample was tested. It is our belief that this was the appropriate approach as for most of the life of the building, the weathered Ipe decking will be in place, and only for the first few years would the decking exhibit its as-installed brownish look. Since the sample available for testing was only partially weathered, we believe this further strengthens our argument, as over time the SRI value will slowly increase, likely moving from its tested value of 27 and eventually crossing the threshold of 29. In conclusion, the Taylor 28 project has located 100% of its parking underground to avoid paving even a single black asphalt parking space, is located in a dense urban environment where amenity spaces-especially those with natural wood elements-are limited and essential to community and producing peaceful outdoor spaces, and has multiple strategies in place to respond to the intent of reducing the heat island effect. The wood decking is only slightly under an SRI of 29, comprises only 9.5% of the over-parking roof area, is 51% shaded via LEED shading methodology, and the remaining roof areas and vegetation will also drastically reduce the heat island effect-combining to nearly trivialize the contribution of the Ipe decking to the heat island effect, while providing a great amenity space and natural element in a dense urban environment. For these reasons and everything described above, we believe that this project should be awarded both Heat Island Effect credits as well as an Innovation in Design point for Exemplary Performance for credit SSc7.1.

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification on the requirements for exemplary performance for SSc7.1. The project team is correct - the Reference Guide states that exemplary performance for SSc7.1 may be awarded an innovation point for exemplary performance by demonstrating that, per option 2, 100% of the on-site parking spaces have been located under cover. In addition to the required documentation, a site plan verifying that 100% of parking is underground should be included. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/10/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Low-Water Nursery Growing System for Plants Used in Landscaping The Southface Eco-Office project is requesting an Innovation and Design credit for the use of Gro-Eco plants in their landscaping. Growing plants for market in this manner requires four and a half times less water daily, and requires up to thirty percent less growing time when compared to traditional methods using overhead irrigation. The estimated water savings for the 400 plants used on site, with an average growing period of a year, was almost 70,000 gallons. The Gro-Eco system uses raised beds that are built and covered with weed cloth. Pockets are then dug in the beds to accommodate nursery pots of various sizes - only the upper third of each pot extends above the top of the bed. Irrigation drip tape runs down each row of plants along the tops of the containers, while another drip tube, buried under the cloth in the center of the bed, helps keep the roots cool. Moderating the temperature of the roots improves the health of the plants and further reduces the amount of water needed. Auxiliary benefits of such a system include: thirty to forty percent less chemical use and drastically reduced runoff, elimination of retention ponds and nitrogen leaching, less need for fungicide due to the elimination of excess moisture on leaves, lower energy costs, and less invasive site design due to the flexibility in drainage topography. For more information on the Gro-Eco process, please view the Florida Agriculture video produced for the 2007 Environmental Leadership Award. http://www.florida-agriculture.com/news/agen_fraleighnursery.htm The requirements for this credit would be to document all plants obtained from Gro-Eco for use on the Eco-Office project, and to provide evidence of the estimated water savings being claimed.

Ruling:

The projects proposal of selecting planting material which is grown in a method of growth which reduces the water, energy and chemical usage worth of an innovation credit, since this is not awarded under other material credits. However, to achieve an innovation credit the project must demonstrate that the proposed approach is a significant portion of the overall project materials budget. A possible approach could include: 1) Calculations showing the baseline water, energy and chemical use and documentation for how that was determined. 2) Calculations showing the alternate growing method and the significant reduction (such as a minimum of 50% reduction in potable water used for irrigation) in water, energy and chemicals. 3) Calculations showing that the landscaping which contributes to the water, energy and chemical reductions make up a minimum of 1% of the total materials based on cost for the project [Please add: the project team must meet the requirements and achieve WEc1.1 and 1.2 in order to be eligible for this ID credit proposal.] Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent To utilize a comprehensive Sustainability Plan for a televised event that extends LEED guidelines from building to an annual event. Proposed Requirements Develop and implement a Sustainability Plan that reduces consumption, increases recycling and reuse, offsets fossil fuel energy use and implements Green Education. Provide resource use and disposal baseline quantities and track improvements. Submittal to demonstrate compliance a) Provide resource consumption baselines for a timeline that includes pre-event preparation and the event itself. b) Provide quantifiable improvements for the event using the same timeline as the baseline. Summary of project design approaches The Live Television Production is a temporary facility for an annual single evening event lasting 10 days. - SITES - Transportation: all participants (presenters and production staff) were provided with GM flex fuel and hybrid vehicles. - WATER Conservation: All urinals are waterless at the venue saving 7 million gallons per year. Lavatory sensors are provided for premium seating restrooms - ENERGY: 10% energy reduction with an incremental decrease of 1% per year for 10 year commitment: Production lighting is designed to reduce electrical usage. 2 million kilowatt-hours of Green Power was provided that met three times the electricity needs of the award broadcast 666,000 kwh were used for the broadcast. - MATERIAL: Reuse: 100 % of all building material on the production set is donated to non profit foundations and memorabilia. - MATERIAL: Recycled content - All paper products had recycled content - Invitations, Posters and Programs are printed on Endeavour Recycled Paper, which is 30% post consumer waste, 50% recycled and is Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. (1 LEED point for 50% FSC ) - Souvenir Telecast and awards celebration. Tickets are printed on stock that is 40% post-consumer waste and 60% recycled. - Tissue products 100% recyclable post-consumer napkins were used for five (5) full days of crew meals and craft services. vi) MATERIAL - Waste: 35% of waste is diverted from landfills by weight - Event generated 1,029 tons of trash, diverted 360 tons from landfill - Event is in compliance with assembly bill 2176 AB-2176. vii) IEQ -- Green Housekeeping: Venue uses two cleaning products that are green seal certified "Hillyard Chemicals. viii) Green Education - The promotion of all the "green" attributes of the event . Naras to confirm if the greening was indicated on any of the print material used for the event - Raise awareness of the availability and benefits of Green Power in Los Angeles and beyond. Green Volunteer Team responsible for placing recycling containers in key staff and public facing areas and educating people on what goes in the bins. In addition to managing the recycling stations, each volunteer had a document on hand to speak to the other aspects of the events that were green. ix) FOOD - Water sponsored by PRIMO, whose bottles are made from American grown corn oil, not petroleum - The 100% of food packaging is nature based and environmentally sustainable - 100% Sustainable Food for crew & parties - Regional, Organic, humane and environmentally-friendly food and food practices, including seafood, dairy, and produce - 100% Reusable service materials and accessories. Reusable service materials such as ceramic plates, glass tumblers and silverware included at crew meals and craft services. - Food Waste -- 100% food waste from the event was sorted, compacted and managed by New Market Waste Solutions for donation and composting. - Food Donation. Venue Concessionaire Partner donates edible left over food to the Angel Donation program at a local mission. Un-used food from the after-party (& crews) donated to local organization to feed the homeless in local shelters.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting confirmation on whether an innovation credit may be awarded based on sustainable practices relating to an annual event. Innovation credits are reserved for green building strategies that demonstrate innovative performance in green building that are not specifically addressed elsewhere in the rating system and/or demonstrate exceptional performance beyond existing credit requirements. While it is laudable that environmentally preferable practices be implemented for events, it does not appear that the proposed credit is related to green building practices and is therefore not eligible for an innovation credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/22/2005
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

PULSED POWER TECHNOLOGY [Alternative Process Water Treatment] Intent: Reduce the impact of potentially hazardous chemical discharges to the environment by eliminating conventional means of process water treatment in HVAC equipment. Reduce amount of water consumption from conventional recirculating water systems such as cooling towers, hydronic HVAC systems, or process water systems by decreasing the need for make-up water caused by evaporation and system blowdown (or bleed). Requirements: Provide an integral chemical-free water treatment technology in place of conventional water treatment which uses potentially toxic chemicals which may also produce potentially hazardous chemical byproducts. Provide documentation in the form of a letter from the project engineer that includes a narrative description of the chemical-free water treatment system used and how the system works. The narrative shall specifically state the environmental benefits of using the chemical-free process in place of the conventional chemical water treatment system; state specific chemicals and their estimated quantities eliminated by substituting the chemical-free process; state the methods and quantities of process water discharge as an estimate of potential water savings. Rationale: Recirculating water systems used in building mechanical processes such as HVAC heat rejection in cooling towers and hydronic heating and cooling systems often use chemical infiltration using manual or automatic injection processes in order to chemically treat the water contained in them. Chemical treatment is typically used for a wide range of functions such as the prevention of mineral scale formation, control of microbiological populations, and to inhibit corrosion. These functions may be equally served by the introduction of an electronic process known as pulsed power technology. Environmental benefits of the pulsed power technology are achieved simply with the elimination of potentially hazardous chemicals and their toxic byproducts used to prevent formation of mineral scale, control of microbiological populations, and inhibit corrosion. Conventional chemical treatment systems often ultimately cause the release of potentially hazardous substances into the environment through water discharge such as evaporation, spills, spray, and drift. In conventional process water systems such as open cooling towers chlorine or other biocides are used to control biological activity which is rapidly discharged to the atmosphere as chlorine gas. Corrosion inhibitors such as zinc, molybdenates, and phosphates are discharged in the drift from the cooling tower and spray settling to the ground as well as through the sewer system through blowdown draining. Water softeners, not needed in pulsed power processes, are typically used to prevent scaling and discharge quantities of salt brine as part of the softener process. The use of an alternative means of process water treatment in HVAC equipment such as the pulsed power technology is estimated to yield the following benefits and savings when applied to our building project: - the elimination of potentially hazardous chemicals and their toxic byproducts with the elimination of conventional chemical water treatment processes - saves the use of approximately 186 gallons per year of industrial strength chlorine bleach, 5 to 6 gallons of isothiazine, and 115,000 gallons of water containing 2 ppm zinc and 20 ppm phosphate from being discharged into the environment - saves the requirement for approximately 90 lbs. of chlorine per year (most of which is evaporated to the atmosphere) - Annual water usage savings of approximately 67,275 gal/yr when compared to a typical open system water cooling process (cooling tower) of the same capacity with conventional chemical treatment processes Please confirm attainability of this credit.

Ruling:

The environmental benefits presented are worthy of an innovation credit. However, the type of technology you are referencing may be one that has been controversial in regards to actual results. Your LEED documentation must provide the information above, plus proof that the technology truly works: a copy of a third-party analysis and/or letters from at least two of the vendor\'s previous clients (building engineers or facility managers) that confirm the equipment is operating successfully. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
8/4/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ergonomics Strategy

Ruling:

Intent: To create and maintain a flexible ergonomic environment that properly accommodates building users and promotes healthy, comfortable and productive work.
Requirements: Develop and implement a comprehensive ergonomics strategy that will have a positive impact on human health and comfort when performing daily activity for at least 75% of Full Time Equivalent building users. This strategy must include the four components listed below.
1. Identify activities and building functions for which ergonomic enhancement (i.e., ergonomic strategies which exceed standard industry practice) is both possible and desirable through education and equipment. -. Building users should be consulted on their preferences wherever possible. NOTE: Project teams are encouraged to consult one or more of the existing ergonomics standards and guidelines when identifying ergonomic enhancement opportunities. For computer workstations, these include the BIFMA G1, the ANSI/HFES 100-2007, and CSA Z412-00. The US Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has developed ergonomic guidelines specifically for the following industries: Shipyards, Poultry, Retail Grocery Stores, Nursing Homes, and Meatpacking. OSHA also provides helpful information for many other industries in addition to those listed here (please see the Resources section below).
2. Define a set of performance goals and expectations for the ergonomics strategy that address productivity, comfort, and health. Develop a plan and design process to meet them. Provide procedures to track and report the results of the ergonomics strategy, ensure that the performance goals have been met, and identify areas of potential improvement. These should include the following actions: a) Make the performance goals and ergonomics plan available to building users b) Provide a feedback system to collect anonymous responses and respond to them. This should be informal and ongoing. c) Maintain ongoing building user access to appropriate ergonomics METWA's, furnishings, and accessories and education. d) Conduct a survey of user satisfaction. This should be more formal than the feedback system, and occur periodically. The survey must be collected from a representative sample of building occupants making up at least 30% of the total occupants.
3. Provide machine, equipment, tools, work-aids (METWA's), furnishings, and accessories that reduce the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and are acceptable to a wide range of building users. In a setting where building users that spend 50% or more of their time at computer workstations, the following four areas must be addressed: display, computer peripherals (keyboard/mouse), work surface, and chair. Computer workstations include areas in which workers interact with screens or monitors of any kind.
4. Provide ergonomics education to building users Provide at least two opportunities for building users to understand and take advantage of ergonomic features in their environment. At least one of these opportunities must be interactive, and at least one must include an explanation of the provided METWA's and furnishings, preferably by the manufacturer. Post-education evaluations must be conducted. Education opportunities may include, but are not limited to: a) Participatory classroom sessions conducted by an ergonomics professional b) Access to literature on products and basic ergonomic knowledge relevant to the building user's tasks c) Repetitive or regularly-scheduled workstation evaluations d) Interactive internet-based products such as assessment and training tools e) Hands-on experiences, such as access to the showroom of an ergonomic furnishing supplier
Submittals:
1. Provide a narrative that speaks to the requirements listed above. It should include: - descriptions of the steps the project team has taken to identify ergonomic enhancement opportunities. - a sentence or two verifying that it is possible to exceed standard industry practices to achieve an ergonomically superior workplace. - descriptions of the performance goals and expectations, and the steps the project team has taken to meet them - descriptions of the procedures put into place to track and report the results of the ergonomics strategy. Describe how each of the required actions, listed in #5 of the requirements section, will be take place. Describe the collaboration with the management team that will carry out these procedures. - description of how purchased METWA's and furnishings will benefit the building users as they conduct routine tasks and activities, the selection criteria used for choosing the products (i.e., how the safety and health of the building user was considered), and how the products will accommodate a wide range of size needs. Size needs can typically be met by buying products that come in 'families' (small, medium, large) or are highly adjustable. - descriptions of two ergonomics education opportunities made available to building users, including the objectives and content.
2. Provide a list of purchased METWA's and furnishings that minimize the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Include cut sheets and manufacturer information for each. For project certifying under LEED for Existing Buildings : Operations and Maintenance, at least one survey must be conducted during the performance period, and documented survey results and corrective actions to address issues identified through the surveys must also be provided.
Potential Technologies and Strategies: In general, consider METWA's and furnishings that will: - reduce awkward, non-neutral work postures (e.g. neck, shoulders, hands-wrist, low back, elbows, lower extremities) - reduce duration of sustained/static work postures (e.g. leaning forward, elevated arms, continuous grip) - reduce grip and pinch forces associated with required tasks (e.g. correct tools) - reduce the repetition and duration of tasks, especially those with non-neutral postures and/or higher forces - reduce contact stress - resting soft tissues of the body on hard or sharp surfaces. To address the four required areas for building users that spend 50% or more of their time at computer workstations, consider the following strategies: Display adjustability - The display centered directly in front of the body. - The top of the display screen placed no higher than the eyes. - The ability to place the display screen 18 to 36 inches from the eyes - Control over the tilt angle of the screen and its' position on the work surface - The capability to position the display low enough to accommodate individuals with bifocals or progressive addition lenses (PALs). This may be significantly lower than eye height reduced glare - The use of technologies such as flat-screen or anti-glare devices - The display positioned such that light sources will not create glare Peripherals - Paper documents placed on a document holder immediately to the left, right or below the display - The keyboard positioned so the home row (row with F and J keys) is no higher than the elbow - The ability to adjust the keyboard angle and set the slope of the keys flat, if so desired - Enough room for the mouse or pointing device to be used adjacent to the keyboard (left, right or in front). If a separate adjustable keyboard support is used it must have space specifically designed for using a mouse or pointing device; preferably the mouse pad should have the capability to be positioned flat if the keyboard is tilted - The arm used to control the pointing device supported, either on the work surface or armrest of the chair - Ergonomically correct keyboards, mouse, phones and other supporting peripherals purchased when possible Surface - Enough work surface to properly support the computer and peripherals. Provide a surface with minimum dimensions of 28 inches wide by 24 inches deep - Enough clear space under the surface to allow the legs and feet to be positioned in multiple postures - Furnishings in multi-occupant workstations that allow the user to control surface and support heights, with surface height initially at proper seated elbow height. If workstations are single-occupant it is acceptable for facilities management to adjust the heights of surfaces Chair - Range of chair types or chair features that optimize employee fit and task requirements. - Chairs with a wide range of adjustibility For building users that work in an industrial setting, consider: - Height adjustable work-surfaces (e.g. desks, work benches, fume hoods) - Pneumatic vs. electric vs. manual tools, material handling aids, such as lifts, height adjustable pallet jacks and hand trucks. - Range of hand and power tools sizes and weights that improve employee fit and function while reducing ergonomic risk factors, for example: grip diameter, multi-finger activation and vibration isolation For ergonomics education provided to building users, consider including information on: - The possible causes of musculoskeletal discomfort - Changing the workstation or work habits if discomfort is experienced during or after work - Benefits of taking work breaks either through altering tasks performed or leaving their workstation - Benefits of resting the eyes every 20 minutes - How to properly position and adjust display height and angle, keyboard height and angle, mouse location, use of task light and chair adjustments - Acceptable postures for the head, neck, shoulders, upper arms, wrists, back, legs and feet - Benefits of regularly changing posture either through adjusting the furnishings or altering the tasks performed - How to manage glare on the computer screen - A point of contact if discomfort becomes frequent (multiple times per week)
References: Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/ergonomics/index.html, Human Factors and Ergonomic Society http://www.hfes.org, Canadian Standards Association http://www.csa.ca, The Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturer's Association http://www.bifma.org/, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists http://www.acgih.org/, International Organization for Standardization www.iso.org please reference the ISO 9241 standard, The Hewlett Packard Safety and Comfort Guide http://www.hp.com/ergo/ HealthyComputing.com, http://www.healthycomputing.com/office/setup/, 'Effect of Office Ergonomics Intervention on Reducing Musculoskeletal Symptoms ' Amick B., Robertson, M., Derango, K., Bazzani, L., Moore, A., Rooney, T., Harrist, R., , Spine 2003, 23: 24, pp 2706-2711. This study demonstrates that an office ergonomics intervention can reduce a workers perceived level of pain and increase their productivity. 'A Prospective Study of Computer Users: II. Postural Risk Factors for Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Disorders' Marcus, M., Gerr, F., Monteilh, C., Ortiz, D., Gentry, E., Cohen, S., Edwards, A., Ensor, C., Kleinbaum, D., , American Journal of Industrial Medicine 2002, 41: pp 236-249 This landmark study reports on the body postures and work practices that increase or decrease the odds of computer users experiencing musculoskeletal discomfort and disorders.
Definitions: METWA : machine, equipment, tools, work-aids.
**Update October 1, 2013: There are only four required components, the text previously mentioned five. Applicable credits were also updated.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/30/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We would like to submit the following inquiry: will utilizing well system for irrigation of the landscaped portion of the school project\'s site qualify for "innovative performance"? The credit intent is to utilize well pumping water for irrigation from ground water aquifer instead of providing water for irrigation from storm water basins, so the storm water basins area can be utilized as a green space, except during rain. Although designed on the site dry storm water basins can be easily utilized as water detention ponds collecting rainwater to irrigate selective landscaped areas (playfields), the water well was used instead for this purpose. The following are requirements for "Innovative Performance" and description, how the proposed design\'s approach would meet these requirements: 1. Quantitative performance improvements. Location of the well in the middle of the playfields minimizes the irrigation piping. Ground water aquifer allows continuous, uninterrupted supply of filtered water. In the pumphouse adjacent to the well there is on-demand irrigation controller and AC Tech Variable Frequency Speed motor drive which controls well pumps. Both of these controllers allow for easy interface between the ground water well supply and the irrigation demand read by the irrigation controller\'s soil moisture sensors. 2. Comprehensive process and specification: Well system for irrigation addresses other aspects of the project in addition to irrigation. In the baseline approach, the source of irrigation would be rainwater collected in storm water basins - detention ponds. These standing water ponds would need to be enclosed for safety reasons on school premises, they could be also a breeding ground for mosquitoes, foreign matters collection and prone to contamination. By utilizing well for irrigation the dry storm water basin areas can be treated as green spaces at any time except for rain. They can be used for educational purposes such as play areas, PE practice fields, marching band practice, science projects, amphitheater and other uses. Also the green grassy spaces will generate more CO2 and will have direct positive benefit to the environment. The calculations that show water well system is sufficient and necessary supporting data will be provided as a part of credit submittal. 3. The credit is applicable to all other projects where climatological, soil and ground water data prove it viable.

Ruling:

No, utilizing well pumping water for irrigation from ground water aquifer does not qualify as innovative performance. The credit intent of WEc1, Water Efficient Landscaping, is to "limit or eliminate the use of potable water, or other natural surface or subsurface water resources available on or near the project site, for landscape irrigation". In addition, NC v2.2 WEc1 CIR ruling dated 9/19/2006 and NC v2.1 WEc1.2 CIR rulings dated 1/20/2004 and 11/5/2005 all state that the use of surface water or water drawn from receiving waters is not an acceptable way to meet the credit intent. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/29/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Title: Educational Outreach Program Intent: To broaden the public\'s knowledge and awareness of green building strategies from a lessons learned perspective and to use the facility as a full scale example. The intent of the design team is to submit for an Innovation and Design Credit for an Educational Outreach Program. The project is a Car Wash & Maintenance Facility (hereafter referred to as the Facility) for a major Metropolitan Transit Agency. Due to the nature of the Facility the building is not generally open to the public. Use of the facility is limited to staff and organized visitations, thus onsite general public education would not be lucrative. Instead of an onsite educational program the Agency has accomplished / will be accomplishing the following: Educational Outreach: Project was featured in the Agency\'s "Going Green" brochure that was distributed on Earth Day. The use of captured rain water at the new Facility was a component of the Agency\'s "Earth Day" car posters distributed throughout the car fleet. The Agency\'s web site prominently features the Facility and has an animation of the Car Washer showing the captured / recycled rain water feature. Also, this website has recently been upgraded, as required by an Executive Order of the Governor, to be "accessible" to the hearing/visually impaired. Educational flyers on the Building will be available at the main lobby to visitors. Presentations: Presented a paper on the project at the Railroad Environmental Conference at UIUC in 2002. (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) "Green" features of the new Maintenance Facility and Car Washer were part of the Transit Agency\'s "Building for Tomorrow" brochure and presentation at the UITP Conference on Sustainable Design. This was also presented at the APTA conference on the environment given in NYC. Tours: A delegation from MetroVal (Valencia Metro, Venezuela) went on a tour through the facility. There are also additional plans for a group of engineering students from Colombia University to tour the Facility. Awards: Applied for and received a "Green Apple" award (honorable mention) from NYC/DOB and the US-EPA for Green Building Design. Design Guidelines: Established Design Guidelines for "Sustainability" for implementation throughout the Capital Program that were a direct result of the Green Design efforts on this project. We propose to submit copies of all the brochures created as part of this outreach program as well as website information for viewing. This project is not the typical project for which LEED NC was originally designed. As a major Metropolitan Transit Agency - the project is very high profile and thus contributes to the expansion of green building into the mainstream. As such, we feel that these efforts should obtain an Innovation & Design credit. Please let us know if these efforts will garner us an additional credit and if not, what we may do to accomplish this under this specific type of facility and ownership. Additionally, we would also like to know what submittals will be necessary to establish sufficient evidentiary information for the USGBC review.

Ruling:

Your education and outreach program is eligible for an innovation point. It meets the general requirements established in the credit ruling dated 9/24/01. To document these strategies in your LEED certification submittal, please include the information from your CIR narrative and provide a copy of the Design Guidelines for Sustainability and other materials. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/22/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Title: Whole Building Double Water Filtration to Obviate the Need for Bottled Water Intent: To minimize or eliminate the use of plastic water bottles in buildings by providing the purity levels afforded by bottled water through comprehensive building water filtration. The bottled water industry has grown substantially in the past decade. About 74% of Americans drink bottled water; one in five drinks only bottled. Demand is outstripping recycling capacity. According to the Container Recycling Institute, each year an ever smaller proportion of plastic bottles are recycled; from 2 out of 5 in the mid \'90s, to only 1 out of 7 today. Seventy million water bottles are disposed of each day, with 60 million going into landfills, oceans or incinerators. Our project plans to implement a two-stage water filtration system that provides water purity equal to or better than bottled water. Implementing water filtration technology is an answer to the severe environmental impact of bottled water, because it reconciles people\'s desire for pure, safe drinking water with the imperative of reducing waste. By installing two-stage water filtration - first at the main (point-of-entry, POE) and then downstream within kitchen cabinets (point-of-use, POU) -- and educating our occupants about the health and environmental advantages of the system, we anticipate a dramatic reduction in the purchase of bottled water in our building and associated waste. The two-stage configuration, and the specific equipment selected, are designed so as to minimize environmental impact by 1) at POE using negligible water for self-cleaning, and 2) at POU achieving significant filter cartridge longevity. Requirements: - Provide building-wide point-of-entry water filtration that removes particulate contamination equal to or smaller than 10 microns; AND - Provide point-of-use water filtration at 0.2 micron (fine enough to remove bacteria) and NSF/ANSI Standard 42 and 53 certified. AND - Educate building occupants about the system, how it works and its substantial environmental benefits. Benefits: - Obviate the need for bottled water by providing high performance and low impact two-stage water filtration that will substantially reduce the amount of plastic water bottles going to waste from our building. - Reduce the exposure to potentially harmful waterborne contaminants for the entire population through universal access to filtered water. - Reduce the energy required to heat water by screening out particulates that over time negatively impact system efficiency. - Reduce the amount of pollutants released in the manufacture and transportation of bottled water attributable to our building. There are 70 million bottles of water consumed in the US per day. Dividing that number by the total population of approximately 306,000,000, means that 23% of the US population is drinking one bottle of water a day. We believe this estimate to be conservative and that widespread adoption of two-stage water filtration could have a much bigger impact, especially in areas with known water quality problems. We estimate that our 1200 apartment project will have 2130 occupants. Therefore, 23% of 2130 = 479 people drinking one bottle of water a day times 365 days/yr = 174,835 bottles for this one building resulting in a reduction of 149,858 (6 out of 7) bottles going to landfill, oceans or incineration. New occupants will be given an orientation session at the time of lease by the property manager explaining the dual system, the POU maintenance requirements and why the cost and environmental impact of bottled water can be avoided in the building. The tenant environmental guideline will also detail the environmental impact of bottled water and describe the system benefits and performance. The filtration system will be a highlighted feature on all leasing and green building tours.

Ruling:

Installation of a water filtration system, with the intent of eliminating the use of plastic water bottles is an acceptable effort for achieving an Innovation in Design credit, as long as calculations and policy/program descriptions are provided as required by posted CIR ruling dated 11/15/2007, showing the quantifiable benefits that may result from the reduction of waste and transportation. Please provide the policy/program document which details the environmental impact of bottled water use and describes the system benefits and performance. Policy/program descriptions must also confirm that the building?provided filtered water will be available at 100% of kitchen sinks throughout the building, and that maintenance of all filtration system components and point?of?use filter replacement will be provided by the building owner per manufacturer\'s guidelines. For core and shell projects, these requirements will need to be part of a legally binding agreement with the tenants, such as a tenant lease or sales agreement. As part of the program/policy document project team will be required to outline an orientation program to educate building occupants about this sustainable feature of the building and the expected use of filtered water from sinks instead of bottled water; consider adding other green features on the building to this orientation. Documentation of the filtration system, education policy, and sales or lease agreement will need to be provided for certification. ***This CIR Ruling has been updated on 9/14/2009*** Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/19/2002
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ecologically Based Landscape Design and Pest Control: The project site is an urban infill site located in Sacramento, California. The project is an office building for the State of California, housing the Department of Education. Prior to the design and construction of the new office building, the site was a surface parking lot with a few trees surrounding the site on the perimeter. Adjacent to the project is a six-story apartment building and across from the site is the California State Capitol mall, a park like setting, with many differing plants and tree species represented. Contained within the project is a small pocket park, which separates the office building from the adjacent apartment building. The park was selected as a site for the State Arts in Architecture program, and a nationally known artist was selected for the art commission. In response to community outreach efforts, and in response to neighborhood concerns about open space, the Design Team for the project worked with the artist to develop a unique response. The team worked on the development of the landscape design using specific features listed below, coupled with the strategy of an ecologically based landscape management and maintenance program. The team also sought to use the project landscape as a means to educate and promote the use of organic based urban landscaping and agricultural farming and the use of beneficial insects as a substitute for pesticides. Features of the Ecologically based Landscape Design and Pest Control include: - An interpretive fountain and sculpture that uses gray water and that reflects the culture and environs of the Sierra Foothills; - Native plant materials, selected for their appropriateness to the climate, low water requirements, adaptation of the native cultural landscape of the region, and aesthetic appeal. Plant material was also selected for its ability to provide habitat for beneficial insects; - Organic landscape specifications including soil mix management, sub-surface drip irrigation, gray water and organic fertilizers; - An irrigation system that utilizes high efficiency drip technology and reduces water consumption by 63%; - A fertilizing and feeding plan, which includes a biological nutrient management using compost tea, injected into the irrigation system; - The project also has a retail component, designated as restaurant space. Once restaurant tenants are identified, the Design Team will work with the tenants to develop a composting process to recycle organic waste streams from the building and the restaurant tenants, including food waste, landscape pruning, etc. - Training of the building and grounds maintenance staff to monitor for insect pests and plant disease. Training the staff to release beneficial insects as the primary means of pest control, and training the staff to use soft pesticides and to avoid toxins. - Educational stations with plaques and graphics delineating the ecological methods utilized, beneficial insect and plant identification and their symbiotic relationships. - Consultation on pest problems and supplying beneficial insects to the project for the duration of the two-year warranty period. Question: Could this interpretive pocket park, developed with neighborhood concerns, educational goals and coupled with organic practices be considered an innovation point?

Ruling:

Yes, this project could attempt an innovation credit by addressing the education value of the "green" features of the park. A previous LEED Interpretation on the issue of an educational program in relation to buildings to achieve an innovation credit: please see Inquiry Number 0121-IDc11-092801. To summarize the earlier ruling, your project must be ACTIVELY instructional by including two of the three following elements: 1) comprehensive signage program to educate; 2) manual, guideline or case study to inform the design of other projects; 3) educational outreach program or guided tour focusing on sustainable living. As outlined in your inquiry, most of these elements are planned or already incorporated into the program in a very comprehensive way that reaches across many credit categories. Rather than focusing on a sustainable building education program as described in the previous inquiries, this project could focus on a sustainable site educational program that highlights green features throughout, as suggested in your narrative. You must be vigilant in your documentation of the measures described and provide adequate photos/drawings and other documentation along with narratives explaining your intent, the requirements, the submittals and the design approach, as directed in the Reference Guide. The opportunity to achieve innovation credits is designed for just such projects that either lie outside the existing LEED credits or exemplify exceptional performance in sustainability.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/7/2002
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Fly Ash Blended Cement We are looking to score one innovation credit for the use of fly ash blended cement. However, we are looking to use approximately 10% of normal, non-blended cement (300 cy out of a total of 3,000 cy)due to coordination and timing issues. If we then use approximately 90% blended cement, would we still be eligible for the innovation credit?

Ruling:

To achieve an environmental benefit, it is critical that fly-ash REPLACE cement content, not just be added as a filler. Adding fly-ash to a concrete mix without reducing cement content has only limited advantages to the environment. It is unclear from the question whether the project is actually off-setting cement use. The Credit Ruling Committee has suggested that a 40% REPLACEMENT of cement with fly-ash would qualify for an innovation credit. Lower levels of fly-ash use are more typical, and would not be considered innovative enough to warrant an innovation point. Note that there are many complexities of fly-ash use with respect to concrete strength requirements that factor into the discussion of what constitutes an innovation. Regardless of the percent used, fly-ash content would count toward MR Credit 4; Recycled Content Materials.Modification Note as of July 1st, 2012: The applicability of this LEED Interpretation has been modified to indicate that it is applicable to LEED 2009 projects. However, USGBC and GBCI will be phasing this Innovation strategy out. While this strategy is acceptable for LEED 2009 it will not be acceptable for LEED 2012 because the environmental benefit(s) of replacing cement with alternative cementitious material will be captured in available credits. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/24/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Green Building Educational Component This project intends to provide a two-part educational package as part of its process. This will consist of the following: 1. A display system comprised of small iconographic signs throughout the facility highlighting where green strategies have been employed. These icons will then be complemented by a display panel in the main cafeteria space which highlights what the green building strategies are, and some of the impacts. Rather than put text-based signs throughout the facility, the icons will remind people as they move through the space that there is something green there. All employees go to the cafeteria several times a day, and this way the centralized panel can highlight the environmental impact of each piece of the building. For example an icon at the parking lot can highlight how much the hybrid vehicle parking spaces are reducing emissions. An icon at the toilet rooms can highlight how many gallons of water are going to be saved each year. By having the icons spread throughout the facility we can illustrate how pervasive our green strategies are. 2. A case study book or website, tied in to graphics of the building, which will highlight materials and strategies used throughout the facility. It will be cross-referenced with synergistic efforts made in the owner\'s corporate office center, also under construction and also seeking LEED certification. This resource will include both materials used, design strategies employed, and local suppliers and professionals involed in the project, such as construction entities, local waste recyclers, etc. This case study book or website will be shared with the USGBC and the Pittsburgh Green Building Alliance (GBA). Please review and let us know if this approach will meet the intent of the CIR from 9/24/2001 regarding educational programs for Innovation in Design points, and whether this approach is likely to be awarded a point if submitted.

Ruling:

To meet the requirements for an innovation credit for education, as outlined in previous CIR rulings, signage must be built into the building\'s spaces and comprehensively addresses the green building strategies employed in the project. A case study must inform the design of other buildings based on the success of this project. The strategies described meet this intent. Credits are not awarded through the CIR process and achievement will be based on the documents formally submitted. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/30/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent: "To provide design teams and projects the opportunity to be awarded points for exemplary performance above the requirements set by LEED-CS Green Building Rating System and/or innovative performance in Green Building categories not specifically addressed by the LEED-CS Green Building Rating System." We are presenting this CIR in order to receive guidance about the likely outcome of the proposed Innovation Credit if accomplishments are proven by the certification submittals. INTENT To educate tenants on lifestyle changes that can improve their physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing; build a sense of community; enhance the work environment; and promote alternative modes of transportation. REQUIREMENTS Provide tenants with access to a Working Well Program (WWP) for a minimum of three years. Provide a WWP coordinator on site three days per week. He/she shall be responsible for; organizing all activities, marketing events, conducting monthly special events, and recruiting other wellness experts as required, preparing regular reports for evaluation by management and an annual executive summary highlighting participation and tenant feedback, and delivering a wellness activities plan to the tenants on a monthly basis. SUBMITTALS Provide the letter template signed by the developer declaring that a WWP coordinator has been engaged for a minimum of three years. Provide a copy of the agreement between the Developer and WWP coordinator demonstrating that the Program will be provided for at least three years. If an audit is requested during the certification process: Provide a copy of the annual activity plan, including a brief description of each event and schedule. Provide a copy of tenant agreement sections or information package outlining the structure and costs of the WWP available to the tenant. DESIGN STRATEGIES The Program will serve to educate employees on the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Seminars and activities should be used to promote alternative modes of transportation such as walking and cycling for increased fitness and reduced pollution. The public transportation and bicycle storage and shower facilities available to tenants will be promoted through the WWP, thus increasing their use and furthering the intent of the Sustainable Sites credits. The health and wellness information and activities should be selected such that they increase productivity through improved morale, reduced sick-time, and reduced workplace injuries. Communication between the WWP Coordinator and the Tenant should be ongoing to assess the demand for certain activities and information sessions to increase employee involvement. A tenant representative should be appointed to ensure that the needs of the tenant are being met by the WWP. Environmentally-friendly activities should be emphasized and specialists in sustainable living should be included in the education aspect of the Program. Sample WWP activities and features include:

Ruling:

The applicant is asking whether the proposed Working Well program is likely to be accepted as an innovation credit. Although innovation credits are not awarded through the CIR process, this proposal does not provide adequate justification of the environmental benefits of the program, and the human health benefits do not directly relate to the design, construction or operations of the building, which are the focus of the LEED-CS rating system. As stated in the CIR, the program is provided as an option for all tenants - there is no requirement or guarantee that any will participate. Further, the benefits of alternative transportation are already awarded through existing SSc4 credits. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/19/2002
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Grants for PV Panels The Design Build Team for a government office building in California was given a stipulated sum for the entire scope of the project. In an effort to incorporate green strategies to the project that would otherwise not have economically feasible with the limited budget, the Design Build Team sought out new sources for funding, outside the Project stipulated sum, including federal, state and local grants and industry incentive programs. One identified source was a local utility that would donate photovoltaic panels under the stipulation that the panels had to be incorporated into the architecture, and not just added onto the building. The design team re-designed parts of the exterior, and worked with the exterior building envelope sub-contractors and the PV panel suppliers to develop systems to incorporate the PV panels directly into the exterior curtain wall. As a result, over 300 PV panels were incorporated into the project at no cost to the Owner. The PV wall system includes both structural butt-glazed panels and captured panels, which kept intact the original design intent. Question: Would the seeking out of funding sources for green features be considered an innovation point?

Ruling:

No, securing additional funding for green building features does not constitute an innovation. Rewarding projects that buy down first cost through incentive programs is contrary to the LEED objective of demonstrating green building performance within conventional cost assumptions. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We would like to establish a precedent for using the LEED Innovation in Design (ID) Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical Activity on LEED projects across LEED Rating Systems. 1. Intent of CreditPromote the health and fitness of residents and staff through building design and operation, while achieving synergistic environmental benefits.2. Why this Credit is NeededRegular physical activity is associated with reduced rates of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some cancers and reduced health care costs. Obesity, and with it type 2 diabetes, are epidemic in adults and children, and are rising rapidly in the U.S. These conditions, along with cardiovascular disease and cancer, are leading causes of death and health care costs in the U.S. Physical inactivity and poor diets are second only to tobacco. LEED has taken an early leadership role in banning indoor smoking to control environmental tobacco smoke as a perquisite in 2000. As the leading causes of premature deaths in the U.S. Cardiovascular diseases have also now overtaken infectious diseases as the leading causes of death globally, physical activity in our built environment can help slow society\'s second biggest killer, inactivity.Research has shown that improvements in building design and operation have measurable impacts on occupant physical activity, and are important, alongside neighborhood design, for reducing health problems associated with physical inactivity. 3. LEED Projects Already Approved with ID Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical ActivityThe LEED (ID) Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical Activity has already been implemented and approved on several LEED projects such as Via Verde & Riverside Health Center, which were both LEED NC projects, and 2 Gotham which was a LEED CI project. Sample Submittals for LEED (ID) Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical Activity:http://brightpower.biz/greenbuilding/ID-designforhealth http://www.1100architect.com/ (see "Burn Calories not Energy" in the "Sustainability" section)4. Development of CreditThis ID Credit was developed as part of the Active Design Guidelines (www.nyc.gov/adg) by an interagency team including the Active Design Team, which provides technical assistance to LEED projects to assist them in implementing Active Design and The LEED (ID) Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical Activity on LEED projects.5. Synergistic Benefits in the Design For Health Through Increased Physical Activity Strategies:* Recreation time spent in physical activity rather than TV viewing lowers energy consumption as TVs are projected to overtake refrigerators as the main source of household appliance electricity use in New York State* Elevators routinely account for 3-10% of a building\'s total energy use, by promoting use of pedestrian modes of vertical circulation such as stairs and ramps over motorized modes of vertical circulation such as elevators, escalators, and moving platforms, energy use can be greatly reduced. In Riverside Healthcare, which previously earned this LEED ID Credit Design For Health Through Increased Physical Activity, the facility found that elevator energy use during non-operational times (10 pm to 6 am) was 35% of elevator energy use during building operation times, suggesting an energy savings of up 65%, if elevators are not routinely used. * Energy savings are expected to be a supplement to the other primary benefits of this proposal, which are health benefits for occupants and the surrounding community, and benefits to society in reducing health burdens and health care costs (akin to the LEED Prerequisites for Environmental Tobacco Smoke and credits for Low-VOC finishes).Articles documenting benefits related to Green Building & Physical Activity:http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=77#public_health Quantifiable Benefits Matrix &Associated Reference List:http://brightpower.biz/files/Quantitative%20Benefits%20Matrix.pdf http://brightpower.biz/files/Design%20for%20Health%20-%20Reference%20Lis... 6. Further Information about Health & Active Design in Green BuildingThe Active Design Team recently hosted a webinar from USGBC\'s headquarters in D.C. about the LEED (ID) Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical Activity and benefits of physical activity through routine daily use of our built environment.Health and Active Design through Green Building Webinar:https://video.webcasts.com/events/usgb001/37845

Ruling:

This inquiry has also been submitted as a User-Generated Pilot Credit Application and will be reviewed by the Pilot Credit Library Working Group through the pilot credit process. The Working Group evaluation will include an in depth weightings exercise and prioritization. If the credit is approved for use in the Pilot Credit Library, it will be available to all applicable projects and rating system types. If the credit is not approved, it can be revised and resubmitted through the Pilot Credit process, but cannot be resubmitted as a precedent setting LEED Interpretation without major revision.
**Updated 10/1/13 for rating system applicability.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/5/2004
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Clerestory to bring natural light into subterranean space: exceptional IEQ Our project is a 250,000SF subterranean sports facility. Due to the site and security constraints, we are unable to incorporate windows in the space. However, the design team feels strongly about the importance of natural light, especially in a sports facility, where users are exercising and relaxing. Therefore, in the design, we introduce 4 clerestories, designed with internal reflectors, along the sports facility to bring in natural light. As a result, the daylight factors of the major interior spaces are as follows: Natatorium: 7% Indoor track: 29% Indoor basketball court: 14% This is remarkable results for an underground facility. the clerestories also serves as fresh air intakes for the mechanical systems, therefore reducing the need of constructing a separate aerial way. We strongly believe that this will be qualified for an Innovation and Design Credit.

Ruling:

The incorporation of daylight is a strategy which is addressed in EQc8 and is a design option in most building types, including underground facilities. It appears that the design strategy outlined will meet the criteria for EQc8.1 for natural light in 75% of regularly occupied spaces and does not warrant a separate credit for innovation. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/3/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Design for Increased Physical Activity Credit Intent: The obesity epidemic is a major health crisis facing the American public, leading to the increased incidence of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease among other ailments. Increased physical activity, as little as two minutes of stair climbing each day, could significantly reduce the rate of obesity in the country. Extensive studies by the Center for Disease Control and other independent researchers* have shown that there are four major elements of building design which encourage greater physical activity: A) Stairs - Signage prompts encouraging the use of the stairs. - Improved stairwell aesthetics through use of color, artwork, music, etc. - Favored central locations for stairwells. B) Access to exercise facilities - Weekly exercise classes - On-site walking trails - Gym or exercise room C) Improved streetscapes - Sidewalks/traffic safety - Comfort lighting - Aesthetic landscaping D) Community location - Urban density - Mixed use - Connectivity of pathways to destinations *Full text of these reports is available via email as files cannot be posted with CIRs. Credit Requirements As LEED already accounts for the items listed in C & D, we propose that the ID credit be earned through meeting 4 of the 6 items listed in A & B. Submittal A LEED-Online letter template including the project compliance narrative and floor plans highlighting the design elements included. Project Approach The Riverside Health Center is a partial renovation and addition project that will provide the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene with a contemporary facility to serve their Health Academy, Nutrition, Primary Care Clinic, STD Clinic, Family Daycare, and School Health programs. The building design will include a centrally located stair, signage prompts containing info on the benefits of taking the stairs. The stairwell itself has been enlarged to encourage greater use, will feature added ventilation, operable windows, and is to be included as a site for expressing the project\'s 1% for the arts. The 1% for arts is a city funded program that matches 1% of a project\'s construction budget towards a public art project. In addition to fulfilling all three stairwell improvements, the building features an exercise room, will offer weekly yoga classes, and includes an on-site community garden with landscaped pathways to encourage outdoor exercise.

Ruling:

Along with statistical data, additions to your approach could earn you an innovation credit. Currently, while the overall intent is laudable, it is unlikely that the proposal described above would earn an innovation credit. To earn an innovation credit, project teams must demonstrate innovative performance in Green Building categories not specifically addressed by the rating system. An example to enhance the approach might include design of the site to ensure that there are sidewalks of some minimum width to promote walking. These innovations need to be comprehensive in nature and have significant, measurable environmental benefits. This proposal focuses on fitness, health, and lifestyle related issues that are generally considered outside the scope of the LEED Rating system; LEED does promote productivity and overall wellness of building occupants. In addition, as written, it is unclear how the project team would demonstrate quantitative performance improvements for environmental benefit (establishing a baseline of standard performance for comparison to the final design). Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
3/21/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 296,000 sf medical center. We are requesting consideration and guidance for a potential Innovation and Design point for the inclusion of a Healing Garden and Outdoor Place of Respite in the design of the building and site. Using criteria from the Green Guide to Healthcare Guideline system we have created a Healing Garden on site that provides patients, visitors, and staff accessible outdoor Places of Respite that takes into account: security and safety, supervised, sun orientation and other microclimatic factors, direct connection to the natural environment and garden spaces, noise of mechanical equipment, accessibility, way finding and orientation, strength and stamina of patients, activity and interest, privacy and security and proximity to building entries and restrooms. The Garden also provides choices and variety in the design of spaces, engaging the senses of sight, sound, touch, smell and is integrated with native plantings and garden elements. The intent of the garden is to provide places for quiet reflection that assist in the process of healing of patients and provide for the physical, emotional and spiritual well being of all users. The garden is sized appropriately to meet the needs of patients. Interior lobbies and public spaces adjacent to the garden space allow for viewing of the garden in passing throughout the day as well as during inclement weather. A growing body of research shows that patients, medical staff and other care givers experience positive health benefits from access to daylight, landscape views and garden spaces. Providing a variety of spaces for people to pause and experience their natural surroundings is an important design and whole-healthcare objective. The spaces are universally accessible and provide a variety of seating areas for both ambulatory and wheelchair users. Suggested Documentation includes: Area Tabulations and ratios that show: - Net program summary. - Site Plan(s) highlighting public outdoor places of respite equal to 5% min. of project net program area. - Floor Plans and site plans highlighting indoor and outdoor places of respite dedicated for staff/occupants use equal to an additional 2% of project net program area. - Garden Plans and sections illustrating orientation, accessibility, proximity to interior services, Plant material types and quantities, hardscape material types, textures, etc.

Ruling:

Although Innovation in Design credits are not awarded through the CIR process, the proposed strategy is similar to LEED for Healthcare SSc9.1 Places of Respite. An innovation credit would be considered based on the requirements of this LEED credit. In addition to the requirements outlined in the inquiry above, please note that there are some additional requirements under LEED for Healthcare. For the complete credit requirements, please see http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=3468.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are seeking an Innovation in Design credit for implementation of innovative, environmentally beneficial measures through active intervention in the zoning and land development process of the larger community. In the end, a 16,000 s.f. project was able to leverage over 200,000 s.f. of LEED Gold. Background While St. Stephen\'s was in the design process for its LEED project, a local developer proposed to build on the vacant lot located one property lot away to the south. The project team learned that the developer was preparing to present the building design drawings at an upcoming Harrisburg Planning Commission meeting, during which variances would be requested for significantly exceeding the height and setbacks allowed by city zoning code. St. Stephen\'s publicly opposed providing a variance for these excesses primarily because the neighboring building would cut off access to sunlight that the St. Stephen\'s project team was planning to collect for day lighting and PV arrays. Given the developer\'s and St. Stephen\'s prestige in the community, St Stephen\'s requested a meeting with the developer to discuss the issues to see if the height could be lowered or setbacks aligned with zoning requirements. The outcome was that the developer agreed to meet with the St. Stephen\'s team. Initially the developer brought in his architect to explain the designs. The St. Stephen\'s team also presented its sunshade studies. The developer agreed to examine stepping the new building back between the 5th and 8th stories so that the St. Stephen\'s complex would not be in shadow so often. Ultimately, no accommodations for setbacks were provided and it was acknowledged that the developer had no intention of making it a sustainable or LEED building. Soon thereafter, the developer divulged that the tenant would be Pennsylvania Housing and Finance Authority (PHFA). Resulting LEED Achievement During the time period that followed, St. Stephen\'s thought that there was an opportunity in this to leverage their position and negotiate a greater good by supporting the proposed zoning variances. At the time in 2002, very few PA state agencies were pursuing LEED certification for their buildings, with the exception of DEP. The project team thought that fighting the developer and PHFA might ultimately gain the 16,000 s.f. St. Stephen\'s school daylight, but rather than be "penny wise and pound foolish" the project team realized that there would be a much greater benefit if they could convince a public agency to make greater accommodations that would benefit the larger Harrisburg and Pennsylvania community in the name of environmental responsibility. They believed this could be especially important given that the agency is the PHFA that would deal with the future housing in the state. As a result, the St Stephen\'s project team invited the PHFA representatives to join in the discussions with the developer. During the subsequent meetings, the St. Stephen LEED design team educated the building\'s developer and its tenant, the PHFA, about sustainable design buildings and negotiated a formal agreement. This agreement accomplished 1) a minimum silver rated building for a state agency, 2) a smaller building that was "stepped back" so that it would relate better to the surrounding small and historic buildings within the neighborhood and not leave them all in shadow, 3) higher density in the neighborhood by allowing a smaller setback and taller building than zoning permitted, and 4) greater access to solar energy for the Episcopal school by granting St. Stephen\'s rights to harvest solar energy from the PHFA roof, which is much larger than St. Stephen\'s and would see more daylight than St Stephen\'s would otherwise due to surrounding buildings and trees. As a result of the St. Stephen\'s project team efforts, the developer and PHFA were prompted to enlisted their architect to redesign their project to include sustainable design features and achieve the minimum LEED silver rating that St. Stephen\'s demanded as part of the negotiated agreement, which is why sustainable design became one of the inherent development goals of the PHFA building. The PHFA building ultimately received LEED Gold Certification in September 2005.

Ruling:

The USGBC does not consider this proposal alone to merit an innovation credit. However, a comprehensive public education program on LEED rating system and the benefits of green building is a laudable strategy worthy of an innovation credit. A green education program must meet the requirements of CIR ruling dated 9/24/2001. The proposed narrative outlining the educational outreach program undertaken by the project, can contribute as one of the educational elements. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/1/2013
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can a Green Team strategy that recognizes individuals who opt-in to an environmental awareness program be used to earn innovation credit? The program would utilize outward recognition, regular communication about environmental programs, educational materials, and a method for voting for credits during the LEED process.

Ruling:

Green Team programs and other educational strategies are commendable, and can include various strategies as described in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations and Maintenance, but educational program components that directly contribute to the LEED certification process, such as meetings relating to LEED Certification or credit selection, are not eligible. Please see the educational program description under IOc1.1 for acceptable educational program components. Note that the education program strategies listed in the reference guide are geared toward 1) educating building occupants about how they can learn from the building and implement green practices at home (signage, website, newsletter); 2) visitors/general public who can learn about the building and its practices (tours, outreach programs); or 3) other building professionals who can apply the strategies of this building on other buildings (tours, case studies). At least two ongoing, actively educational components must be included. Each Innovation in Operations strategy is eligible for a maximum of one point. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/27/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent of credit: ---- Reduce operations related carbon footprint and encourage organizations associated with LEED projects to do likewise. Requirements for compliance: ---- Identify operational sources of carbon emissions not otherwise addressed by LEED. Establish the operational carbon footprint of the occupants of the LEED project verified by a recognized authority. (See CIR dated 6/29/06 for list of authorities). Obtain carbon offsets for the carbon footprint associated with operational sources of carbon emissions equal to or greater than 50% over 2 years**. Submittals: ---- 1. Signed letter template declaring that offsets equivalent to at least 50% of operational carbon emission loads associated with air travel, car travel, and natural gas for a period of at least two years have been obtained. 2. Narrative describing the project\'s approach to addressing carbon loads. 3. Calculation used to determine carbon emissions, resulting equivalence data, and quantity of offset measures required. 4. Certification document from a recognized source of carbon offset credits. Design Approach (Strategies) / Narrative: ---- Reliable analysis of construction related life cycle carbon emissions is difficult to obtain and verify at this time. Emissions data related to operations are more readily available and recognized authorities exist that can quantify the carbon emissions related to operations based on established metrics. This credit addresses carbon emissions other than those addressed by LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power. The following steps describe the actions needed to achieve this credit: Research currently available carbon emission measurement standards and offset options. Identify recognized service providers. (See CIR dated 6/29/06 for list of recognized authorities) List carbon emission sources specific to operations associated with the project in question. Run calculations on offset measures needed. Obtain carbon offset credits at least equivalent to 50% of operational carbon emission loads associated with natural gas, air travel, and car travel for a period of at least two years. This innovation credit meets the three basic criteria for innovation credits as described in the LEED Reference Guide: 1. Quantitative performance improvement: A baseline evaluation of the operational carbon footprint using methods specified by a recognized authority (Green-e for instance) establishes a starting point and is used to calibrate the quantity of carbon offset measures needed. 2. Comprehensive program: The program addresses business related carbon emissions related to air travel, car travel, and natural gas, not covered by LEED and augmenting similar efforts related to electrical loads achieved by meeting LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power requirements. 3. Applicability to other projects: This innovation credit provides an outline for any organization interested in addressing their operational carbon footprint. Similar ID credits related to post occupancy efforts are listed in the USGBC\'s Innovation & Design Credit Catalog (1 December 2007), including credits addressing: Green Cleaning; Monitoring Threatened & Endangered Species; Donation and Protection of Open Space (not assoc. with project site); Alternative Transportation Management Plan; Employee Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions; Food composting; Occupant recycling program; Waste reduction operations; Work at home program; LEED post-occupancy performance evaluation; Employee wellness; Educational program; Student report; Carbon offset; Environmentally preferable services; and Off site environmental benefit. ** Time period and % based on those established for the LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power credit.

Ruling:

The applicant submitted a CIR proposing an innovation and design credit in which projects would offset the emissions associated with tenant space operations. While this proposal does demonstrate environmental benefits, it cannot be approved at this time due to the complexities surrounding carbon accounting. USGBC is performing research in this area and will update this CIR ruling as necessary. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/22/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Intent: Implement a "Green Office Program" for building tenants who commit and prove they are operating as a "Green Office". The program will encourage tenants to operate more sustainably even if they are not performing a renovation (LEED-CI) for their office space. The goal is to provide method for tenants to move into the direction of sustainable operation, and with supporting documents showing achievement, be rewarded by the property management office. This will also encourage tenants to perform conduct cost-benefit analysis for improvements that can be achieved at nominal and/or no cost. Even credits that have a cost may still have that cost returned through reduced operating expenses. The "Green Office Program" is promoted through the building tenant guide and distributed by building managers, which encourages tenants to identify and implement no-cost and low-cost alternatives to operating in a standard indoor office environment. Scored on a scale of 100, offices are evaluated in seven categories: Energy Efficiency, People & Atmosphere; Travel & Commuting; Reduce, Reuse & Recycle; Cleaning; Remodeling & Construction; and LEED. When a specific strategy or improvement has been implemented, participating tenants earn "Leaf Credits." If an office achieves "70 Leaf Credits", it is then designated as a GREEN OFFICE. Here are a few items (entire program will be submitted with ID): Energy: - Set computers to "energy save" mode - Lower blinds in summer; raise blinds in winter - Install occupancy light sensors - Replace End of Life computer monitors with Energy Star Equipment - Set "sleep mode" for office equipment - Install compact fluorescent/low mercury light wherever possible People and Atmosphere: -Organize office employees to participate in a sustainability-focused community project once per year -Keep you local office employees updated quarterly about what green efforts you have achieved, your future sustainable goals, and how they can assist in reaching those goals Travel & Commuting: - Instead of traveling for meetings, reduce emissions by encourage teleconferencing and videoconferencing when possible - Ensure 25% of employees carpool or use mass transit to commute to work Reduce/Re-use/Recycle: - Use mugs and tumblers to save waste on disposable cups and plastic bottles - Participate in E-recycle Day for buildings annual e-recycle drive - Transition from petroleum-based or non-compostable products (ex: Styrofoam) to biodegradable products - Do not order any bottled water. Procure bottle-less water coolers to provide cool and hot filtered municipal water Remodeling & Construction: - Certify your office space as LEED-CI - Standardize workspace configuration to accommodate future change that will minimize remodeling and construction - Shift from "closed single offices" to efficient "open-office work plans" Requirements: Every 2 years, the tenant office manager would submit a scorecard to the property manager listing "green opportunities" achieved. Supporting documentation must be provided to achieve the credit. The tenant representative would also be required to attend quarterly building management/tenant meetings to updates to "Green Office Tenant Guidelines" and how they can promote sustainable office/business operation. As you can see, our goal is not to replace LEED-CI. Our program will not only encourage tenants seek LEED-CI, but also help grow our sustainable culture among building occupants beyond the built environment. Many tenants want to operate more sustainably. This program will be their guide.

Ruling:

The described approach would qualify for an Innovation in Operations point due to the comprehensive and extensive education and outreach to building occupants and tenants around sustainability issues. Please note that this initiative falls under the umbrella of green education, and only one education-related IO point can be awarded per project. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
3/21/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Exemplary performance in Landscape & Exterior Design to Reduce Heat Islands / Non-Roof. Intent: The intent of this proposed Innovation in Design credit(s) is to show exemplary performance as it pertains to Heat Island mitigation. The project is a Campus Dining facility located on a 3 acre site with heavy pedestrian traffic and thru-way circulation. The sought innovation in design is for taking 2 incremental steps above the 30% LEED compliance totaling 98% High-Albedo surfaces across the entire 3 acre site. Design Approach: The project is proposing to use Concrete paving with an initial reflectance of .4-.5 for 98%, or 36,852 sq.ft., of the sites impervious non-roof surfaces. Only 2%, or 863 sq.ft,. of the site will be asphalt paving. Please note also that 18.5% of this already compliant concrete paving will have additional shading by proposed native vegetation. Lastly, the roof surface is covered by a High Albedo LEED compliant roof surface for a total 91% of the roof surface equaling 16% greater than LEED compliance. This makes 65,604.5 sq.ft. of the 3 acre sites total impervious surface of 69,230 sq.ft. constructed with High Albedo materials for a grand total of 95% (this does not include the added benefit of shading by trees 18.5%). Based on the LEED intent for these credits, we feel as though we are good candidates for (2) or more innovation points for exemplary performance. Please advise.

Ruling:

One Innovation Credit for Exemplary Performance is available for LEED-NC Version 2.1 projects that demonstrate 60% or more of the total non-roof impervious surfaces have a reflectance of 0.30 or higher. The project team should consider alternatives to reduce impervious surfaces that could reduce storm water management and heat island while still meeting the hardscape design intent. Utilizing such a design strategy can reduce both heat island and stormwater runoff and potentially increase the project\'s points toward certification. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

DESCRIPTION Proposed achievement of this credit involves production of a fifteen minute video overview of the resort\'s LEED and green features. INTENT Previous rulings have indicated a minimum of two of the following solutions were required to achieve a point for public education within the Innovation and Design category: - Comprehensive signage program - Development of a manual, guideline, or case study - Educational outreach program or guided tour It is the intent of this CIR to seek a ruling that would permit the use of digital media (i.e., video) to serve, as an alternate path to all of the above. REQUIREMENTS Utilize digital media to expand upon the delivery of public education through: - Providing context to the LEED plaque (to be located in the lobby) by playing back the video on a flat screen adjacent to the plaque. This will provide expansive meaning to a plaque that will be viewed by thousands of people each year - including many who are not familiar with USGBC or LEED. Additionally, this would also reduce the traditional use of lobby paper products to tell the green story. Such paper products can sometimes go underutilized and/or are quickly discarded. - Educating visitors on the LEED and non-LEED green attributes of the resort by the daily and multiple playbacks (minimum 4 times each day) of the video on the resort\'s dedicated in-room television channel. This would achieve USGBC\'s goal of educating visitors to the project. - Educating new employees by playback of the video as part of their initial training and orientation. This would achieve USGBC\'s goal of educating employees. - Reaching a larger audience beyond those traveling to the resort by featuring the video on the resort\'s website and the corporation\'s environmental initiatives website. In essence the video provides a virtual, as opposed to physical guided tour, of the project without expanding facilities unnecessarily in order to conduct tours of the back of house physical plant. This would complement USGBC\'s goal of sharing the successes of this project with others who may not have the opportunity to visit the project. SUBMITTALS LEED Design Application Milestone: - Proposed location of lobby LEED plaque and adjacent flat screen - Story treatment/synopsis LEED Construction Application Milestone submittals would include: - Shooting script - Shooting schedule - Schedule of daily playback on the in-room resort channel - Web address/proposed design for the resort and environmental affairs websites that would host the video.

Ruling:

The proposed innovation credit is based on using digital media, in the form of a video, which will provide information about the green features of the building. While commendable, this approach alone does not substantiate a comprehensive green education program to warrant achievement of an innovation credit. An additional strategy should be adopted, and must be actively instructional, such as an educational outreach program or guided tour, or a comprehensive signage program built into the building\'s respective spaces. Please refer to the established requirements for this as noted in the LEED-NC v2.1 CIR ruling dated 09/24/2001. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/10/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following proposed innovation in design credit is intended to demonstrate that Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST) designed for distribution of natural gas and LPG (propane Gas) systems saves time, reduces cost, and is environmentally friendly where integrated in a holistic approach to a building project. This innovative technology is the only standard based natural gas and LPG (propane gas) system manufactured, designed sized and installed under the ANSI LC1 certification process. CSST is IAPMO, ICC and CSA listed; IFGC, UPC and NFPA-54 approved as a gas-piping material. This system is installed with fewer fittings eliminating leak paths in the natural gas or LPG (propane gas) system, thus making the system safer within a structure. The inherent flexibility and light weight will reduce costs and help prevent job related accidents. Most manufactures\' of CSST incorporate a fitting which uses a metal to metal seal with no gaskets or O-rings and features which allows for maintaining of the integrity of the Polyethylene jacket protecting the system from corrosion and harsh environments. The Polyethylene jacket, as required by ANSI LC1, is constructed to meet the ASTM E84 requirement for Fire /Smoke (25/50) making the system safer in the event of fire. This innovative technology eliminates the need for welding of natural gas and LPG piping and the dangers associated with such procedures, such as toxic fumes from welding gases, flux and brazing rods and smoke and soot caused by welding. This technology reduces respiratory problems associated with inhaling the toxic fumes resulting from welding of natural gas and LPG piping and eliminates the dangers of fire associated with welding of natural gas and LPG piping. It also eliminates personal injury associated with the use of welding and threading equipment. It is our intent to submit for this credit as a system which exceeds the LEED-NC performance as related to a safer environment during construction and safer system within a structure, for the life of the structure.

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification as to whether the use of Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing for distribution of natural gas and LPG warrants the award of an Innovation in Design credit. While the benefit of reduced exposure for construction workers and building occupants are laudable, this concern is addressed in EQ Credit 3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan - During Construction. As stated on page 325 of the NCv2.2 Reference Guide, "This credit is not eligible for exemplary performance under the Innovation in Design Section". Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/20/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent To reduce environmental impacts of print infrastructure through minimizing energy usage, greenhouse gas emissions, and solid waste generation. Challenge: Document printing contributes to office energy consumption. Office equipment accounts for 4% of the electricity consumption in office buildings (Energy Information Administration 2008). On average, companies have one device for every 2.2 workers (Global e-Sustainability Initiative 2008). On average, devices are used only 1-2 percent (about 15 minutes) of a typical day (Xerox data, compiled from thousands of on-site visits and interviews with more than 100,000 people). A large enterprise may have hundreds or thousands of devices. Each year, Americans generate millions of tons of waste in our homes and communities (U.S. EPA). Every year, the United States generates approximately 230 million tons of "trash"--about 4.6 pounds per person per day (Annenberg Media). Solution: Print infrastructure optimization is an opportunity for improved building operational efficiency, in which multiple personal and single function devices are replaced with shared, networked multifunction devices. We propose the incorporation of Print Infrastructure Optimization into building operation as a means to reduce the environmental impact of office-related equipment. We aim to reduce lifecycle energy consumption by at least 20% from the baseline. We aim to reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions by at least 20% from the baseline. We aim to reduce lifecycle solid waste by at least 20% from the baseline. Approach Process: Assessment & Analysis - Print infrastructure assessment will be performed to determine the current and optimized product mix and usage. In addition, a streamlined lifecycle-based evaluation that includes raw material extraction and processing, use of equipment and consumables, and solid waste generation shall be used. The methodology used to develop the life cycle data sets should be consistent with ISO 14040. At a minimum, include results for life cycle energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and solid waste. Data indicate that print devices of similar technology and speed bands have similar characteristics and can be aggregated together (EuP Preparatory Studies for Imaging Equipment). This approach will enable a more efficient process for collection and analysis of data. Baseline Current number of devices Establish Baseline for Lifecycle Energy Use Establish Baseline for Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Establish Baseline for Lifecycle Solid Waste Generation Design Case Optimized number of devices Establish Design Case Lifecycle Energy Usage Establish Design Case for Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Establish Design Case Lifecycle Solid Waste Generation Proposed Submittals: Print infrastructure assessment w/ recommendations Narrative that declares that you have implemented assessment recommendations Calculated results of Print Infrastructure Optimization Lifecycle Energy Usage Reduction of 20% - Baseline vs. Design Case Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction of 20% - Baseline vs. Design Case Lifecycle Solid Waste Generation Reduction of 20% - Baseline vs. Design Case

Ruling:

An Innovation effort that uses life cycle assessment is an appropriate effort for a LEED point. The project team must perform ISO 14040 life cycle assessments on at least 5% of the volume of annual purchases within one of the LEED procurement categories (ongoing consumables, durable goods, or facilities alterations and additions) per the LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance Reference Guide, page 496. If printer purchases comprise less than 5% of the volume of annual purchases within the durable goods category, the team must identify additional goods to include in a life cycle assessment study. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
3/15/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Prior to submitting the full Template and supporting documentation for this Innovation & Design Process Credit, we would like to request an evaluation to ensure we are on the right path for this credit. Our project is a mixed-use facility with residential units at 7 levels, retail at the ground level and parking below grade. We plan to integrate an Educational Outreach Program, following the guidelines as defined in IDc1.1 inquiry dated 9-20-01. The following is the Outline of our Program: I. Interpretive Signage Program A signage permanent signage program will be designed and installed to communicate the major sustainable design aspects of the project to the visitors and customers of the facility, highlighting the various sections of the LEED program - Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Materials and Resources, Energy & Atmosphere and Indoor Environmental Quality a. Retail - Signs to be located at the Paseo area between the two buildings and will highlight the sustainable design features of the project, including: 1. Water Efficiency - reduced water consumption and irrigation by captured ground water 2. Stormwater reduction and Heat Island reduction: Rooftop gardens and Green Roof - reduces Stormwater quantity, reduces heat islands at the roof and provides the residents with a gardening plot. 3. Recycled materials & low VOC materials as well as Construction waste diversion from landfills. 4. Alternative Transportation - preferred parking for HOV, secured bicycle parking for residents, adjacency to bus stops and ferry service. A signage program will be designed and installed to communicate energy and water efficiency data on a monthly basis to the residents. The intent is to encourage residents to make a concerted effort towards reducing energy and water consumption. b. Residential - Signs to be located at Residential Common Lobby Areas II. Project Manual for Sustainable Design features for the project a. Manual will include narratives and supporting graphics documenting the design approach for the 5 sections of the LEED NC v2.2 Submission b. The LEED Checklist and Templates submitted to the USGBC will be included in this Manual for reference by others. III. Educational Outreach Program a. The Home Owners Association will sponsor Educational Programs (Organic Gardening, Organic Cooking, Sustainable Living Practices, Energy Consumption Reduction) will be held at the facility in the meeting room for residents to further their awareness of sustainable living.

Ruling:

The provided description has met the precedent set forth in CIR Ruling dated 9/24/01. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/24/2001
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Title: Green Building EducationINTENT: To provide public education focusing on green building strategies and solutions.REQUIREMENTS AND SUBMITTALS: Credit 1.1 (1 point) Provide permanent educational displays illustrating at least one component of each of the five major green building categories in the LEED rating system:Sustainable SitesWater EfficiencyEnergy and AtmosphereIndoor Environmental QualityMaterials and Resources- Provide narrative to describe the intended green building education program that will use the displays.- Provide narrative to describe the selected green building educational displays.- Provide design drawings of the educational displays and their locations in the building.Credit 1.2 (1 point) Provide educational outreach focusing on sustainable living and building practices to serve the general public.- Provide education program with identifiable tasks and outcomes geared toward sustainable living and building practices.- Develop an ongoing education program to provide access to practical methods for homeowners and others for sustainable living and building practices.SUMMARY OF REFERENCED STANDARDS: There are no such referenced standards for this credit.GREEN BUILDING CONCERNS: Public education is necessary to encourage green building practices in public programs, private development, and residential communities. The purpose of this innovative credit is to encourage public education in green building projects and provide a strategy to meet that goal.Mission Statement: To inspire people to live more sustainably, using flexible and achievable standards for building and landscaping practices in such a way as it will protect our local and regional natural resources.DESIGN APPROACH: Even though this credit is designed with an environmental education center in mind, the principles of public education can be applied to either public or private structures. For example, office buildings, although a private enterprise, have employees coming and going each day. A building that is didactic and is reinforced with clearly defined educational displays can have a significant impact on the user\'s understanding of the built and natural environment. Transforming thoughtful design solutions into educational opportunities is the intent of this credit. Also, disseminating effective and practical information on sustainable living and building practices to the general public is a fundamental way to make changes in our society.

Ruling:

To take advantage of the educational value of the green building features of a project and to earn a LEED point, any approach should be ACTIVELY instructional. Two of the following three elements must be included in the educational program:1) A comprehensive signage program built into the building\'s spaces to educate the occupants and visitors of the benefits of green buildings. This program may include windows to view energy-saving mechanical equipment or signs to call attention to water-conserving landscape features.2) The development of a manual, guideline or case study to inform the design of other buildings based on the successes of this project. This manual will be made available to the USGBC for sharing with other projects.3) An educational outreach program or guided tour could be developed to focus on sustainable living, using the project as an example. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/23/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a three story laboratory facility in the city of Port St. Lucie Florida. The project has used an exterior coating system with a higher heat reflectance value than the values of conventional coatings. This credit interpretation request is to inquire about submitting the coating system used, to apply for a credit for reduced heat island effect for non-roof surfaces. The Total Solar Reflectance (TSR) values of the exterior coatings used in the building were tested using a D&S reflectometer according to ASTM C1549-04. The TSR value of the BML-01 "White" color used was 82.9% and the TSR value for the PPG522-3 "Water Chestnut" color used was 74.5%. To prove merit for one point under LEED, we have followed the guidelines of the LEED reference guide to document Sustainable Sites Credit 7.1-Heat island effect non-roof. The baseline case and design case were calculated using the exterior wall surface area and 50% of the site hardscape area. The baseline case was calculated using 43.7% solar reflectance for conventional beige paint to match the color used in the building and 35% for new gray concrete hardscape. The design case was calculated using 74.5% solar reflectance for the Water Chestnut coating used and 5% for new asphalt hardscape. Using Ecotect and site specific data the building was modeled with the correct north orientation. Ecotect calculated the incident solar radiation that strikes the north, south, east and west walls, and the hardscape surfaces annually in Wh. The incident solar radiation value for the four facades and the hardscape were added, and multiplied by the solar reflectance values to determine the site reflected solar energy. The analysis showed that 61% of solar energy would have been reflected using conventional paint and new gray concrete, but instead we are reflecting 77% of the total solar energy incident on the site using a coating with a higher heat reflectance value. We would like to know if this approach of using exterior coatings with higher reflectance values to lower heat island effect on non-roof surfaces will be acceptable to document one innovation in design point.

Ruling:

The project is proposing to earn an innovation point for using high heat reflectance value exterior wall surfaces. Please note that Innovation & Design points are not awarded through the CIR process. As described, this approach is not eligible for an ID credit at this time. Currently, no standard methodology, metric, or baseline assessment exists for exterior wall heat island effect reduction. The proposed methodology (EcoTect modeling), metric (solar reflectance), and baseline do not address heat island effect reduction as currently outlined in the LEED Rating System (using solar reflectance index - SRI). Furthermore, as this proposal is suggesting a modified exemplary performance compliance path, the requirements of SSc7.1 would first need to be met. Based on the details provided above, it is not clear if SSc7.1 would be achieved. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/5/2004
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ozone System in Lap Pool and Spa: exceptional IEQ Our project is a sports facility with a 6-lane, 25m swimming pool and 2 spas. Instead of the conventional chlorine system, we are using an ozone system to treat the water. The Ozone system has the following advantage: - Destroys bacteria, mold and mildew - Eliminates spores, yeasts, fungus and inactivates viruses - Aids the removal of minerals such as iron and manganese - Water is softer and has neutral pH - Leaves no unpleasant chemical or smell, no chloramines build-up, the by-products of ozone are heat and pure oxygen - No irritation to the eyes, nasal passages or throat - Will not cause dry skin, bleached hair or faded swimwear - Reduce chlorine consumption to a minimum, saving money on maintenance, and avoid storing such toxic chemical on site. To summarize, the system reduces the use of chlorine greatly (50-75% depending on splash limit). Unlike chlorine, ozone leaves no unpleasant odors or residual chemicals in the pool and spas. It eliminates the problems of red and irritated eyes, dry skin, faded swim wear and other problems associated with chlorine. We believe that this system has significantly increased the indoor environment quality of the project, especially when the pool and spas are frequently used being in a sports facility instead of a private residence. And a large amount of occupants will be benefited. Therefore, we would like to use this for one of our Innovation and Design Credits. Please advice on the feasibility.

Ruling:

The proposed strategy, if incorporated properly, may warrant an innovation credit. The use of an ozonation system that is properly sized and integrated into the swimming pool treatment system will allow ozone to act as the primary oxidizer and disinfectant. Since there is no uniform standard which has been established for ozonation of pools, ozone design criteria for disinfection in the United States is based primarily around US EPA Drinking Water Guidelines. Dose rate values between .4 mg-O3/l are normally cited and .8 mg-O3/l is commonly used. While LEED encourage approaches that reduce the use of toxic chemicals, additional information is required to provide a complete assessment of credit achievement in this case. Please describe limited reduction of chlorine (e.g., state if regulations require a minimum level of chlorine), and provide detailed explanation and proof of substantial environmental benefits (quantified as much as possible). See IDc1.1 CIR review dated 5/21/2003 for further guidance on this issue including appropriate documentation. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/26/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

INTENT We believe that the proposed storm water management system design exceeds LEED\'s storm water goals and intent in both quantity and quality by 1) maintaining on-site infiltration and managing additional off-site storm water runoff, and 2) improving water quality by removing pollutants from on-site and off-site storm water runoff. Additional measures were taken to assure the storm water management system was designed to maximize treatment of storm water runoff from adjacent properties. DESIGN APPROACH The proposed new construction is located on 13.7 previously developed acres consisting mainly of hard-turf soccer fields, gravel parking, and a small abandoned building. Existing site best management practice\'s (BMP\'s) consist of one vegetated swale and there are no rate or volume control measures. Adjacent to the site, along the south and east borders, are 5.0 acres of residential development and county road that currently receive no treatment. The proposed 13.7 acre site and the adjacent off site 5.0 acres share a 48" culvert located in the southeast corner of the proposed site. The proposed on-site storm water management system consists of 4 infiltration/settlement basins, 2 vegetated swales and 1 detention pond. The system is designed to route water from the building roof and parking lots through pre-treatment infiltration basins located on the east and west ends of the parking lot. Water from the west end parking lot infiltration basin will outlet to a vegetated swale which will flow to the detention pond on the southern edge of the site. Water from the east end parking lot infiltration basin will outlet to another infiltration basin near the southeast corner of the museum, which then outlets to a vegetated swale before entering the detention pond on the southern edge of the site. The additional 5.0 off-site acres of storm water runoff will be rerouted to enter the site at the infiltration basin at the southeast corner of the site. As explained above, after treatment in this infiltration basin the runoff flows through a vegetated swale and in to the detention pond. All storm water will then pass through one additional infiltration basin before exiting the site. PROPOSED COMPLIANCE After the construction of the project and its site appurtenances are completed, the impervious areas of the site will consist of a 0.9 acre building footprint, 1.4 acre parking lot, and 1.2 acres of trails, patios, turfed surfaces, and sidewalks. The remaining 10.2 acres of the site will consist of various types of native and adaptive vegetation along with BMP\'s. The 5.0 off-site acres will be rerouted to be incorporated in the BMP\'s of the proposed site. The project team intentionally designed the storm water management system to maximize treatment of on-site storm water runoff and to handle 5.0 additional acres of runoff (approximately 35% additional area) from an off-site residential area and section of county road currently receiving zero treatment. Through hydraulics/hydrology models we have confirmed that the site will reduce peak discharge rates for the 1 and 2 year 24 hour storm events by 30%-15% respectively. The site will also reduce discharge volumes for the 1 and 2 year 24 hour storm events by 50% and 25% respectively. Through water quality models we have confirmed that the site will reduce the total suspended solids by 85% and total phosphorus by 60%. We are confident the combined interaction between the infiltration basins, swales and the detention pond assures that the project site exceed LEED goals and intent for both storm water quantity and quality. PROPOSED SUBMITTAL Site Plan Landscape Plan Hydrology Model Report As a result of our efforts, we believe that the design and implementation of the project\'s storm water management system and the treatment of 5.0 additional acres of off-site runoff should be granted 1 LEED ID point. Please confirm compliance.

Ruling:

As the described measures appear to meet credit intent while exceeding credit requirements an Innovation and Design credit could be achieved. Please provide detailed plans and calculations clearly illustrating how the measures on the project site meet credit requirements while treating an increased volume of at least 35% from offsite sources. Please be certain to document how the offsite water will be channeled to the site and that this offsite project will be completed concurrent with the completion of the project seeking certification, or that appropriate permits have been obtained and funds have been allocated for the completion of this offsite project. Please provide complete stormwater calculations for the offsite area, illustrating, among other things, that this offsite area will not overload the onsite systems.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
3/21/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 103,000 sf addition and remodeling of a healthcare facility that will provide acute care for cancer patients. We are requesting information and guidance for a proposed Innovation and Design point for the re-alignment and re-meandering of an existing creek that borders our campus boundaries. Our facility has entered into partnership with the local watershed management district authority to provide for the re-alignment and re-meandering of Minnehaha Creek - (Minnehaha Creek is a tributary of the Mississippi River located in Hennepin County, Minnesota that extends from Lake Minnetonka in the west and flows east for 22 miles (35 km) through several suburbs west of Minneapolis and then through south Minneapolis. Including Lake Minnetonka, the watershed for the creek covers 181 square miles (469 km

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting guidance and direction regarding a proposed Innovation and Design credit for the re-alignment and re-meandering of an existing creek that borders the project\'s campus boundaries, a strategy which does not have precedent in LEED. It is possible, however, for stream restoration to be an alternative compliance path to meet Sustainable Sites Credit 5.1, Protect or Restore Habitat or, potentially, an Innovation and Design credit for exemplary performance within this credit. For innovation or exemplary performance strategies that are not currently covered in the reference guide, there are three basic criteria (please refer to the complete guidelines in the LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide). The project must demonstrate quantitative performance improvements, the process or specification must be comprehensive, and the formula that the project develops must be applicable to other projects. The proposed strategy does appear to be comprehensive, however, is not quantitative and may not be applicable to other projects. The project team is encouraged to further develop their strategy. Stream habitat quality is typically measured through use of state and federal guidelines describing common indicators and measuring criteria. The most readily identifiable indicators and criteria address stream bank stability, the presence of pools and riffles, and the extent of stream vegetation cover. Suggesting documentation for capturing an ID credit through this strategy include a stream monitoring plan to address these issues. Also, the project team is encouraged to seek out references such as the USGS WRI Report 98-4052 Revised Methods for Characterizing Stream Habitat in the National Water-Quality Assessment Program.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following Innovation & Design CIR is being submitted to assess whether the following criteria could qualify for an ID credit if all standards are met and documentation received: Intent - To provide a mechanism to support novel ideas to improve the environment at Union College. Through a competitive grant-based initiative, members of the Union College community have access to a $16,000 per year pool of funding to either make Union operations more sustainable or to conduct research that will make specific contributions to sustainability at the regional, national or global scale. Grant proposals are required to detail rationale, a project/research plan, anticipated outcome, detailed budget, and timeline, and are rated based on the benefit to environmental sustainability and feasibility. In the 2008-2009 academic year, ten different projects proposed by students, staff and faculty were awarded between $500 and $2000. With the opening of a new USustain headquarters located in Wold Science Center, the office of President Stephen Ainlay has committed to funding for two more academic years. Projects that directly impact the design and operations of the Wold Science Center or research projects that would be undertaken at the Wold Science Center will be especially encouraged. Requirement - Union will support grassroots sustainability ideas for the period 2009-2011. Supported projects will include specific reporting guidelines and communication procedures. The period of funding shall cover a period of no less than two academic years, for a total monetary amount of $48,000. Submittals - Presidential Green Grant RFP (Sept. 2008); Summaries of 2008-2009 proposals funded by Presidential Green Grants.

Ruling:

The innovation credit is based on the merits of the Union College providing funding in support of grassroots sustainability ideas that can impact the operations of the Union, or support research that contributes to sustainability at the regional, national or global scale. While the grant program is clearly focused on environmental issues and is commendable, it is unclear how this directly correlates to the design, construction or operations of the LEED project itself. It should be noted that for the LEED for New Construction rating system, innovation credits are awarded for green building strategies (not covered in the rating system) that demonstrate a comprehensive approach with significant, measurable environmental benefits. If the grant program was specifically (and only) focused on making the operations of the LEED project more sustainable, it may be possible to earn an innovation credit if specific measures were adopted based on the LEED for Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance rating system for example. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can a project earn ID credit for being in a LEED ND neighborhood? What level of certification or stage or review must the project have completed?

Ruling:

Yes, a project can earn ID credit for being in a LEED for Neighborhood Development certified project. The LEED-ND project must be certified, not just registered. LEED-ND projects at any certification level (Certified through Platinum) and any stage of certification (Stage 1, 2, or 3) are eligible.
**Update October 1, 2013 - The ruling below is no longer valid for project registered after 7/1/2013. As many prerequisites and credits within LEED-ND and LEED-NC address similar concepts, simply locating a NC project within LEED-ND neighborhood is not considered innovative and in some cases, can lead to double-counting the use of the same strategy in both Rating Systems.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/1/2016
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

If a building has earned U.S. Zero Waste Certification, can that certification be used to document LEED Operations and Maintenance credits?

Ruling:

Yes, if a building has earned USZWB certification and the scope of the project (i.e. project boundary) is the same as a project pursuing LEED Operations and Maintenance certification, the USZWB certification can be used to document the following LEED credits, provided the corresponding USZWBC credit is earned. A scorecard for the U.S. Zero Waste Business Certification must be provided to demonstrate specific credit achievement.

LEED EB: O+M 2009
MR prerequisite 2: Solid Waste Management Policy; USZWBC includes a mandatory Zero Waste Policy
MR credit 6: Solid Waste Management – Waste Stream Audit; Zero Waste Analysis, Credit 1
MR credit 7: Solid Waste Management - Ongoing Consumables; both Diversion, Credit 1 and Hazardous Waste Prevention, Credit 5
Innovation in Operations credit 1 for Exemplary Performance if at least 95% diversion is achieved

LEED v4
MR prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (waste policy portion only); USZWBC includes a mandatory Zero Waste Policy
MR credit: Solid Waste Management – Ongoing; both Diversion, Credit 1 and Hazardous Waste Prevention, Credit 5
Innovation credit for Exemplary Performance if at least 95% diversion is achieved

Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
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Requirements

Credit can be achieved through any combination of the Innovation in Design/Operations and Exemplary Performance paths as described below:

Path 1. Innovation in operations (1-4 points)
Achieve significant, measurable environmental performance using an operations, maintenance or system upgrade strategy not addressed in the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance Rating System. One point is awarded for each innovation achieved. No more than 4 points under IOc1 may be earned through Path 1—Innovation in operations. Identify following in writing:
  • The intent of the proposed innovation credit
  • The additional environmental benefits delivered
  • The proposed requirements for compliance
  • The proposed performance metrics to demonstrate compliance and the approaches (strategies) used to meet the requirements
  • The proposed requirements met during the performance period
Path 2. Exemplary performance (1-3 points)
Achieve exemplary performance in an existing LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance prerequisite or credit that allows exemplary performance as specified in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. An exemplary performance point may be earned for achieving double the credit requirements and/or achieving the next incremental percentage threshold of an existing credit in LEED. One point is awarded for each exemplary performance achieved. No more than 3 points under IOc1 may be earned through Path 2—Exemplary performance.
Path 3. Pilot credit (1-4 points)
Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library at www.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant and complete the required documentation. Projects may pursue up to 4 Pilot Credits total.

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We didn’t claim one of our credits as an exemplary performance point under IOc1 during the preliminary review, but now we’d like to because it earned exemplary performance per the review comments. Is it possible to claim it now?

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We have an idea for an innovation credit, but we’d like to get input on whether the strategy has merit before we attempt it. What should we do?

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2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the header, change "(1 point)" to "(1 - 4 Points)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the second line of the second paragraph, replace "IDc1" with "IOc1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Replace the last sentence of the paragraph with "Projects may pursue up to 4 Pilot Credits total."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the second line of the second paragraph, replace "IDc1" with "IOc1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the last sentence of the paragraph with "Projects may pursue up to 4 Pilot Credits total."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the first line of the second paragraph, replace "IDc1" with "IOc1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
Below the text of the "PATH 2" section text, insert the following section:Path 3. Pilot Credit (1 point)Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library atwww.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant andcomplete the required documentation. Projects may pursue more than 1pilot credit; however, a maximum of 1 point will be awarded.(Please note that this section was updated on Februrary 2, 2011).
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
12/2/2009Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the first line of the second paragraph, replace "IDc1" with "IOc1"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/2/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Rating System Correction
Description of change:
In the header, change "(1 point)" to "(1 - 4 Points)"
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/14/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Below the text of the "PATH 2" section text, insert the following section:Path 3. Pilot Credit (1 point)Attempt a pilot credit available in the Pilot Credit Library atwww.usgbc.org/pilotcreditlibrary. Register as a pilot credit participant andcomplete the required documentation. Projects may pursue more than 1pilot credit; however, a maximum of 1 point will be awarded.(Please note that this section was updated on Februrary 2, 2011).
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
5/25/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Taylor 28 is a mixed-use project that includes multi-family residential over ground floor retail with underground parking in addition to outdoor plazas and courtyard spaces. The project is located in downtown Seattle, Washington. The project has three above-grade, podium level courtyards that are composed of concrete pavers, raised planting areas, and a small amount of wood decking (ipe). The project has strong design intent focused on minimizing the heat island effect and thus is pursuing and will likely achieve the Sustainable Sites credits for Heat Island Effect for Non-Roof (SSc7.1) and Roof (SSc7.2). We believe the project also satisfies the intent of the Exemplary Performance pathway for Heat Island Effect Non-Roof since 100% of the parking is underground. However, we are confused about how best to demonstrate that accomplishment due to the complexity of our project, contribution of multiple strategies, and imprecise language in the reference guide. Please provide clarification on how to document this credit, given the circumstances described. Even though the roof already satisfies the criteria for SSc7.2 Heat Island Effect, Roof, the roof is reexamined in determining compliance with the Exemplary Performance pathway for SSc7.1 since portions cover the underground parking. As previously mentioned, the project will easily achieve the 50% threshold for SSc7.1, by either or both of the available options. However in order to achieve the SSc7.1 Exemplary Performance threshold of 100%, it seems the project is required to demonstrate that any portion of roof that covers parking has a minimum solar reflectance index (SRI) of 29. We believe that the project satisfies the intent of the credit but is having trouble matching the circumstances of the project to the submittal requirements. As you will read below, only by the strictest definition of the requirements, does the project fail to satisfy the requirements. The following four ways demonstrate both in isolation and in cooperation why our project should be awarded full credit for the Exemplary Performance for SSc7.1: 1. Area-weighted Average SRI - The area-weighted average SRI value for surfaces that are above underground parking is 75, which is composed of the following three elements: a. Roof - White TPO membrane, SRI = 82, Area over parking = 36,483 sf b. Courtyard - Concrete pavers, SRI = 40, Area over parking = 4,742 sf c. Courtyard - Ipe decking, SRI = 27, Area over parking = 1,634 sf The area of vegetation and a corresponding SRI is excluded from the Area-weighted Average SRI. However, it is worth noting that vegetation on the courtyards covers 4,535 sf (9.5%) and further reduces the heat island effect and would increase the average SRI if vegetation could be valued using the SRI metric. The percentage of the total area covering underground parking for each of the four materials is as follows: a. Roof - White TPO membrane, percentage of total roof area: 77% b. Courtyard - Concrete pavers, percentage of total roof area: 10% c. Courtyard - Vegetation, percentage of total roof area: 9.5% d. Courtyard - Ipe decking - percentage of total roof area: 3.5% 2. Shading: The three podium-level courtyards are located one story above street level and are significantly shaded by five levels of residential units that surround them. Due to this, the courtyards are further mitigated from any heat island effect by shading. In fact, using the LEED prescribed shading calculations (qualifying area shaded is the average of areas shaded at 10 a.m., noon, and 3 p.m. on the solstice), even though they only technically apply to the Option 1 compliance path, demonstrates that shade from the building will cover 47 % of the total courtyard area, and 51% of the total wood decking area. This further reduces the influence of the wood decking in contributing to the heat island effect. In addition, tree plantings in the larger courtyard will also contribute to shading of the pavement. 3. The LEED-NC Reference Guide gives an explicit definition of what qualifies a project for the Exemplary Performance Pathway for SSc7.1, "Project may be awarded an innovation point for exemplary performance by demonstrating that.2) 100% of the on-site parking spaces have been located under cover". There is no mention of the requirement that "Any roof used to shade or cover parking must have an SRI of at least 29" as is mentioned in the credit language. Furthermore, the roof in question was not merely put in place as a parking shade, but instead to cover the building, which is already included in SSc7.2 Heat Island Effect, Roof, which this project is already achieving. 4. Amenity Space: The project is sited in a dense urban area, where residential development is part of a strategy to create vibrant neighborhoods. In creating such communities, it is important to provide outdoor amenity spaces for the residents that allow for a respite from the hectic pace of urban life. These courtyards provide simple outdoor gathering spaces comprised of a variety of materials which allow residents to relax in a visually rich outdoor space within the harsher city environment. As a footnote, the Ipe wood decking in question was sent for testing at a laboratory, at a not insignificant cost, to determine its actual SRI value and its impact on the heat island effect. Since new Ipe decking has very different properties than Ipe decking that is a few years old due to the effect of weathering (the brownish wood weathers to a silvery gray over time), a partially-weathered sample was tested. It is our belief that this was the appropriate approach as for most of the life of the building, the weathered Ipe decking will be in place, and only for the first few years would the decking exhibit its as-installed brownish look. Since the sample available for testing was only partially weathered, we believe this further strengthens our argument, as over time the SRI value will slowly increase, likely moving from its tested value of 27 and eventually crossing the threshold of 29. In conclusion, the Taylor 28 project has located 100% of its parking underground to avoid paving even a single black asphalt parking space, is located in a dense urban environment where amenity spaces-especially those with natural wood elements-are limited and essential to community and producing peaceful outdoor spaces, and has multiple strategies in place to respond to the intent of reducing the heat island effect. The wood decking is only slightly under an SRI of 29, comprises only 9.5% of the over-parking roof area, is 51% shaded via LEED shading methodology, and the remaining roof areas and vegetation will also drastically reduce the heat island effect-combining to nearly trivialize the contribution of the Ipe decking to the heat island effect, while providing a great amenity space and natural element in a dense urban environment. For these reasons and everything described above, we believe that this project should be awarded both Heat Island Effect credits as well as an Innovation in Design point for Exemplary Performance for credit SSc7.1.

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification on the requirements for exemplary performance for SSc7.1. The project team is correct - the Reference Guide states that exemplary performance for SSc7.1 may be awarded an innovation point for exemplary performance by demonstrating that, per option 2, 100% of the on-site parking spaces have been located under cover. In addition to the required documentation, a site plan verifying that 100% of parking is underground should be included. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/10/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Low-Water Nursery Growing System for Plants Used in Landscaping The Southface Eco-Office project is requesting an Innovation and Design credit for the use of Gro-Eco plants in their landscaping. Growing plants for market in this manner requires four and a half times less water daily, and requires up to thirty percent less growing time when compared to traditional methods using overhead irrigation. The estimated water savings for the 400 plants used on site, with an average growing period of a year, was almost 70,000 gallons. The Gro-Eco system uses raised beds that are built and covered with weed cloth. Pockets are then dug in the beds to accommodate nursery pots of various sizes - only the upper third of each pot extends above the top of the bed. Irrigation drip tape runs down each row of plants along the tops of the containers, while another drip tube, buried under the cloth in the center of the bed, helps keep the roots cool. Moderating the temperature of the roots improves the health of the plants and further reduces the amount of water needed. Auxiliary benefits of such a system include: thirty to forty percent less chemical use and drastically reduced runoff, elimination of retention ponds and nitrogen leaching, less need for fungicide due to the elimination of excess moisture on leaves, lower energy costs, and less invasive site design due to the flexibility in drainage topography. For more information on the Gro-Eco process, please view the Florida Agriculture video produced for the 2007 Environmental Leadership Award. http://www.florida-agriculture.com/news/agen_fraleighnursery.htm The requirements for this credit would be to document all plants obtained from Gro-Eco for use on the Eco-Office project, and to provide evidence of the estimated water savings being claimed.

Ruling:

The projects proposal of selecting planting material which is grown in a method of growth which reduces the water, energy and chemical usage worth of an innovation credit, since this is not awarded under other material credits. However, to achieve an innovation credit the project must demonstrate that the proposed approach is a significant portion of the overall project materials budget. A possible approach could include: 1) Calculations showing the baseline water, energy and chemical use and documentation for how that was determined. 2) Calculations showing the alternate growing method and the significant reduction (such as a minimum of 50% reduction in potable water used for irrigation) in water, energy and chemicals. 3) Calculations showing that the landscaping which contributes to the water, energy and chemical reductions make up a minimum of 1% of the total materials based on cost for the project [Please add: the project team must meet the requirements and achieve WEc1.1 and 1.2 in order to be eligible for this ID credit proposal.] Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent To utilize a comprehensive Sustainability Plan for a televised event that extends LEED guidelines from building to an annual event. Proposed Requirements Develop and implement a Sustainability Plan that reduces consumption, increases recycling and reuse, offsets fossil fuel energy use and implements Green Education. Provide resource use and disposal baseline quantities and track improvements. Submittal to demonstrate compliance a) Provide resource consumption baselines for a timeline that includes pre-event preparation and the event itself. b) Provide quantifiable improvements for the event using the same timeline as the baseline. Summary of project design approaches The Live Television Production is a temporary facility for an annual single evening event lasting 10 days. - SITES - Transportation: all participants (presenters and production staff) were provided with GM flex fuel and hybrid vehicles. - WATER Conservation: All urinals are waterless at the venue saving 7 million gallons per year. Lavatory sensors are provided for premium seating restrooms - ENERGY: 10% energy reduction with an incremental decrease of 1% per year for 10 year commitment: Production lighting is designed to reduce electrical usage. 2 million kilowatt-hours of Green Power was provided that met three times the electricity needs of the award broadcast 666,000 kwh were used for the broadcast. - MATERIAL: Reuse: 100 % of all building material on the production set is donated to non profit foundations and memorabilia. - MATERIAL: Recycled content - All paper products had recycled content - Invitations, Posters and Programs are printed on Endeavour Recycled Paper, which is 30% post consumer waste, 50% recycled and is Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. (1 LEED point for 50% FSC ) - Souvenir Telecast and awards celebration. Tickets are printed on stock that is 40% post-consumer waste and 60% recycled. - Tissue products 100% recyclable post-consumer napkins were used for five (5) full days of crew meals and craft services. vi) MATERIAL - Waste: 35% of waste is diverted from landfills by weight - Event generated 1,029 tons of trash, diverted 360 tons from landfill - Event is in compliance with assembly bill 2176 AB-2176. vii) IEQ -- Green Housekeeping: Venue uses two cleaning products that are green seal certified "Hillyard Chemicals. viii) Green Education - The promotion of all the "green" attributes of the event . Naras to confirm if the greening was indicated on any of the print material used for the event - Raise awareness of the availability and benefits of Green Power in Los Angeles and beyond. Green Volunteer Team responsible for placing recycling containers in key staff and public facing areas and educating people on what goes in the bins. In addition to managing the recycling stations, each volunteer had a document on hand to speak to the other aspects of the events that were green. ix) FOOD - Water sponsored by PRIMO, whose bottles are made from American grown corn oil, not petroleum - The 100% of food packaging is nature based and environmentally sustainable - 100% Sustainable Food for crew & parties - Regional, Organic, humane and environmentally-friendly food and food practices, including seafood, dairy, and produce - 100% Reusable service materials and accessories. Reusable service materials such as ceramic plates, glass tumblers and silverware included at crew meals and craft services. - Food Waste -- 100% food waste from the event was sorted, compacted and managed by New Market Waste Solutions for donation and composting. - Food Donation. Venue Concessionaire Partner donates edible left over food to the Angel Donation program at a local mission. Un-used food from the after-party (& crews) donated to local organization to feed the homeless in local shelters.

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting confirmation on whether an innovation credit may be awarded based on sustainable practices relating to an annual event. Innovation credits are reserved for green building strategies that demonstrate innovative performance in green building that are not specifically addressed elsewhere in the rating system and/or demonstrate exceptional performance beyond existing credit requirements. While it is laudable that environmentally preferable practices be implemented for events, it does not appear that the proposed credit is related to green building practices and is therefore not eligible for an innovation credit. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/22/2005
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

PULSED POWER TECHNOLOGY [Alternative Process Water Treatment] Intent: Reduce the impact of potentially hazardous chemical discharges to the environment by eliminating conventional means of process water treatment in HVAC equipment. Reduce amount of water consumption from conventional recirculating water systems such as cooling towers, hydronic HVAC systems, or process water systems by decreasing the need for make-up water caused by evaporation and system blowdown (or bleed). Requirements: Provide an integral chemical-free water treatment technology in place of conventional water treatment which uses potentially toxic chemicals which may also produce potentially hazardous chemical byproducts. Provide documentation in the form of a letter from the project engineer that includes a narrative description of the chemical-free water treatment system used and how the system works. The narrative shall specifically state the environmental benefits of using the chemical-free process in place of the conventional chemical water treatment system; state specific chemicals and their estimated quantities eliminated by substituting the chemical-free process; state the methods and quantities of process water discharge as an estimate of potential water savings. Rationale: Recirculating water systems used in building mechanical processes such as HVAC heat rejection in cooling towers and hydronic heating and cooling systems often use chemical infiltration using manual or automatic injection processes in order to chemically treat the water contained in them. Chemical treatment is typically used for a wide range of functions such as the prevention of mineral scale formation, control of microbiological populations, and to inhibit corrosion. These functions may be equally served by the introduction of an electronic process known as pulsed power technology. Environmental benefits of the pulsed power technology are achieved simply with the elimination of potentially hazardous chemicals and their toxic byproducts used to prevent formation of mineral scale, control of microbiological populations, and inhibit corrosion. Conventional chemical treatment systems often ultimately cause the release of potentially hazardous substances into the environment through water discharge such as evaporation, spills, spray, and drift. In conventional process water systems such as open cooling towers chlorine or other biocides are used to control biological activity which is rapidly discharged to the atmosphere as chlorine gas. Corrosion inhibitors such as zinc, molybdenates, and phosphates are discharged in the drift from the cooling tower and spray settling to the ground as well as through the sewer system through blowdown draining. Water softeners, not needed in pulsed power processes, are typically used to prevent scaling and discharge quantities of salt brine as part of the softener process. The use of an alternative means of process water treatment in HVAC equipment such as the pulsed power technology is estimated to yield the following benefits and savings when applied to our building project: - the elimination of potentially hazardous chemicals and their toxic byproducts with the elimination of conventional chemical water treatment processes - saves the use of approximately 186 gallons per year of industrial strength chlorine bleach, 5 to 6 gallons of isothiazine, and 115,000 gallons of water containing 2 ppm zinc and 20 ppm phosphate from being discharged into the environment - saves the requirement for approximately 90 lbs. of chlorine per year (most of which is evaporated to the atmosphere) - Annual water usage savings of approximately 67,275 gal/yr when compared to a typical open system water cooling process (cooling tower) of the same capacity with conventional chemical treatment processes Please confirm attainability of this credit.

Ruling:

The environmental benefits presented are worthy of an innovation credit. However, the type of technology you are referencing may be one that has been controversial in regards to actual results. Your LEED documentation must provide the information above, plus proof that the technology truly works: a copy of a third-party analysis and/or letters from at least two of the vendor\'s previous clients (building engineers or facility managers) that confirm the equipment is operating successfully. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
8/4/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ergonomics Strategy

Ruling:

Intent: To create and maintain a flexible ergonomic environment that properly accommodates building users and promotes healthy, comfortable and productive work.
Requirements: Develop and implement a comprehensive ergonomics strategy that will have a positive impact on human health and comfort when performing daily activity for at least 75% of Full Time Equivalent building users. This strategy must include the four components listed below.
1. Identify activities and building functions for which ergonomic enhancement (i.e., ergonomic strategies which exceed standard industry practice) is both possible and desirable through education and equipment. -. Building users should be consulted on their preferences wherever possible. NOTE: Project teams are encouraged to consult one or more of the existing ergonomics standards and guidelines when identifying ergonomic enhancement opportunities. For computer workstations, these include the BIFMA G1, the ANSI/HFES 100-2007, and CSA Z412-00. The US Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has developed ergonomic guidelines specifically for the following industries: Shipyards, Poultry, Retail Grocery Stores, Nursing Homes, and Meatpacking. OSHA also provides helpful information for many other industries in addition to those listed here (please see the Resources section below).
2. Define a set of performance goals and expectations for the ergonomics strategy that address productivity, comfort, and health. Develop a plan and design process to meet them. Provide procedures to track and report the results of the ergonomics strategy, ensure that the performance goals have been met, and identify areas of potential improvement. These should include the following actions: a) Make the performance goals and ergonomics plan available to building users b) Provide a feedback system to collect anonymous responses and respond to them. This should be informal and ongoing. c) Maintain ongoing building user access to appropriate ergonomics METWA's, furnishings, and accessories and education. d) Conduct a survey of user satisfaction. This should be more formal than the feedback system, and occur periodically. The survey must be collected from a representative sample of building occupants making up at least 30% of the total occupants.
3. Provide machine, equipment, tools, work-aids (METWA's), furnishings, and accessories that reduce the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and are acceptable to a wide range of building users. In a setting where building users that spend 50% or more of their time at computer workstations, the following four areas must be addressed: display, computer peripherals (keyboard/mouse), work surface, and chair. Computer workstations include areas in which workers interact with screens or monitors of any kind.
4. Provide ergonomics education to building users Provide at least two opportunities for building users to understand and take advantage of ergonomic features in their environment. At least one of these opportunities must be interactive, and at least one must include an explanation of the provided METWA's and furnishings, preferably by the manufacturer. Post-education evaluations must be conducted. Education opportunities may include, but are not limited to: a) Participatory classroom sessions conducted by an ergonomics professional b) Access to literature on products and basic ergonomic knowledge relevant to the building user's tasks c) Repetitive or regularly-scheduled workstation evaluations d) Interactive internet-based products such as assessment and training tools e) Hands-on experiences, such as access to the showroom of an ergonomic furnishing supplier
Submittals:
1. Provide a narrative that speaks to the requirements listed above. It should include: - descriptions of the steps the project team has taken to identify ergonomic enhancement opportunities. - a sentence or two verifying that it is possible to exceed standard industry practices to achieve an ergonomically superior workplace. - descriptions of the performance goals and expectations, and the steps the project team has taken to meet them - descriptions of the procedures put into place to track and report the results of the ergonomics strategy. Describe how each of the required actions, listed in #5 of the requirements section, will be take place. Describe the collaboration with the management team that will carry out these procedures. - description of how purchased METWA's and furnishings will benefit the building users as they conduct routine tasks and activities, the selection criteria used for choosing the products (i.e., how the safety and health of the building user was considered), and how the products will accommodate a wide range of size needs. Size needs can typically be met by buying products that come in 'families' (small, medium, large) or are highly adjustable. - descriptions of two ergonomics education opportunities made available to building users, including the objectives and content.
2. Provide a list of purchased METWA's and furnishings that minimize the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Include cut sheets and manufacturer information for each. For project certifying under LEED for Existing Buildings : Operations and Maintenance, at least one survey must be conducted during the performance period, and documented survey results and corrective actions to address issues identified through the surveys must also be provided.
Potential Technologies and Strategies: In general, consider METWA's and furnishings that will: - reduce awkward, non-neutral work postures (e.g. neck, shoulders, hands-wrist, low back, elbows, lower extremities) - reduce duration of sustained/static work postures (e.g. leaning forward, elevated arms, continuous grip) - reduce grip and pinch forces associated with required tasks (e.g. correct tools) - reduce the repetition and duration of tasks, especially those with non-neutral postures and/or higher forces - reduce contact stress - resting soft tissues of the body on hard or sharp surfaces. To address the four required areas for building users that spend 50% or more of their time at computer workstations, consider the following strategies: Display adjustability - The display centered directly in front of the body. - The top of the display screen placed no higher than the eyes. - The ability to place the display screen 18 to 36 inches from the eyes - Control over the tilt angle of the screen and its' position on the work surface - The capability to position the display low enough to accommodate individuals with bifocals or progressive addition lenses (PALs). This may be significantly lower than eye height reduced glare - The use of technologies such as flat-screen or anti-glare devices - The display positioned such that light sources will not create glare Peripherals - Paper documents placed on a document holder immediately to the left, right or below the display - The keyboard positioned so the home row (row with F and J keys) is no higher than the elbow - The ability to adjust the keyboard angle and set the slope of the keys flat, if so desired - Enough room for the mouse or pointing device to be used adjacent to the keyboard (left, right or in front). If a separate adjustable keyboard support is used it must have space specifically designed for using a mouse or pointing device; preferably the mouse pad should have the capability to be positioned flat if the keyboard is tilted - The arm used to control the pointing device supported, either on the work surface or armrest of the chair - Ergonomically correct keyboards, mouse, phones and other supporting peripherals purchased when possible Surface - Enough work surface to properly support the computer and peripherals. Provide a surface with minimum dimensions of 28 inches wide by 24 inches deep - Enough clear space under the surface to allow the legs and feet to be positioned in multiple postures - Furnishings in multi-occupant workstations that allow the user to control surface and support heights, with surface height initially at proper seated elbow height. If workstations are single-occupant it is acceptable for facilities management to adjust the heights of surfaces Chair - Range of chair types or chair features that optimize employee fit and task requirements. - Chairs with a wide range of adjustibility For building users that work in an industrial setting, consider: - Height adjustable work-surfaces (e.g. desks, work benches, fume hoods) - Pneumatic vs. electric vs. manual tools, material handling aids, such as lifts, height adjustable pallet jacks and hand trucks. - Range of hand and power tools sizes and weights that improve employee fit and function while reducing ergonomic risk factors, for example: grip diameter, multi-finger activation and vibration isolation For ergonomics education provided to building users, consider including information on: - The possible causes of musculoskeletal discomfort - Changing the workstation or work habits if discomfort is experienced during or after work - Benefits of taking work breaks either through altering tasks performed or leaving their workstation - Benefits of resting the eyes every 20 minutes - How to properly position and adjust display height and angle, keyboard height and angle, mouse location, use of task light and chair adjustments - Acceptable postures for the head, neck, shoulders, upper arms, wrists, back, legs and feet - Benefits of regularly changing posture either through adjusting the furnishings or altering the tasks performed - How to manage glare on the computer screen - A point of contact if discomfort becomes frequent (multiple times per week)
References: Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/ergonomics/index.html, Human Factors and Ergonomic Society http://www.hfes.org, Canadian Standards Association http://www.csa.ca, The Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturer's Association http://www.bifma.org/, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists http://www.acgih.org/, International Organization for Standardization www.iso.org please reference the ISO 9241 standard, The Hewlett Packard Safety and Comfort Guide http://www.hp.com/ergo/ HealthyComputing.com, http://www.healthycomputing.com/office/setup/, 'Effect of Office Ergonomics Intervention on Reducing Musculoskeletal Symptoms ' Amick B., Robertson, M., Derango, K., Bazzani, L., Moore, A., Rooney, T., Harrist, R., , Spine 2003, 23: 24, pp 2706-2711. This study demonstrates that an office ergonomics intervention can reduce a workers perceived level of pain and increase their productivity. 'A Prospective Study of Computer Users: II. Postural Risk Factors for Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Disorders' Marcus, M., Gerr, F., Monteilh, C., Ortiz, D., Gentry, E., Cohen, S., Edwards, A., Ensor, C., Kleinbaum, D., , American Journal of Industrial Medicine 2002, 41: pp 236-249 This landmark study reports on the body postures and work practices that increase or decrease the odds of computer users experiencing musculoskeletal discomfort and disorders.
Definitions: METWA : machine, equipment, tools, work-aids.
**Update October 1, 2013: There are only four required components, the text previously mentioned five. Applicable credits were also updated.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/30/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We would like to submit the following inquiry: will utilizing well system for irrigation of the landscaped portion of the school project\'s site qualify for "innovative performance"? The credit intent is to utilize well pumping water for irrigation from ground water aquifer instead of providing water for irrigation from storm water basins, so the storm water basins area can be utilized as a green space, except during rain. Although designed on the site dry storm water basins can be easily utilized as water detention ponds collecting rainwater to irrigate selective landscaped areas (playfields), the water well was used instead for this purpose. The following are requirements for "Innovative Performance" and description, how the proposed design\'s approach would meet these requirements: 1. Quantitative performance improvements. Location of the well in the middle of the playfields minimizes the irrigation piping. Ground water aquifer allows continuous, uninterrupted supply of filtered water. In the pumphouse adjacent to the well there is on-demand irrigation controller and AC Tech Variable Frequency Speed motor drive which controls well pumps. Both of these controllers allow for easy interface between the ground water well supply and the irrigation demand read by the irrigation controller\'s soil moisture sensors. 2. Comprehensive process and specification: Well system for irrigation addresses other aspects of the project in addition to irrigation. In the baseline approach, the source of irrigation would be rainwater collected in storm water basins - detention ponds. These standing water ponds would need to be enclosed for safety reasons on school premises, they could be also a breeding ground for mosquitoes, foreign matters collection and prone to contamination. By utilizing well for irrigation the dry storm water basin areas can be treated as green spaces at any time except for rain. They can be used for educational purposes such as play areas, PE practice fields, marching band practice, science projects, amphitheater and other uses. Also the green grassy spaces will generate more CO2 and will have direct positive benefit to the environment. The calculations that show water well system is sufficient and necessary supporting data will be provided as a part of credit submittal. 3. The credit is applicable to all other projects where climatological, soil and ground water data prove it viable.

Ruling:

No, utilizing well pumping water for irrigation from ground water aquifer does not qualify as innovative performance. The credit intent of WEc1, Water Efficient Landscaping, is to "limit or eliminate the use of potable water, or other natural surface or subsurface water resources available on or near the project site, for landscape irrigation". In addition, NC v2.2 WEc1 CIR ruling dated 9/19/2006 and NC v2.1 WEc1.2 CIR rulings dated 1/20/2004 and 11/5/2005 all state that the use of surface water or water drawn from receiving waters is not an acceptable way to meet the credit intent. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/29/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Title: Educational Outreach Program Intent: To broaden the public\'s knowledge and awareness of green building strategies from a lessons learned perspective and to use the facility as a full scale example. The intent of the design team is to submit for an Innovation and Design Credit for an Educational Outreach Program. The project is a Car Wash & Maintenance Facility (hereafter referred to as the Facility) for a major Metropolitan Transit Agency. Due to the nature of the Facility the building is not generally open to the public. Use of the facility is limited to staff and organized visitations, thus onsite general public education would not be lucrative. Instead of an onsite educational program the Agency has accomplished / will be accomplishing the following: Educational Outreach: Project was featured in the Agency\'s "Going Green" brochure that was distributed on Earth Day. The use of captured rain water at the new Facility was a component of the Agency\'s "Earth Day" car posters distributed throughout the car fleet. The Agency\'s web site prominently features the Facility and has an animation of the Car Washer showing the captured / recycled rain water feature. Also, this website has recently been upgraded, as required by an Executive Order of the Governor, to be "accessible" to the hearing/visually impaired. Educational flyers on the Building will be available at the main lobby to visitors. Presentations: Presented a paper on the project at the Railroad Environmental Conference at UIUC in 2002. (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) "Green" features of the new Maintenance Facility and Car Washer were part of the Transit Agency\'s "Building for Tomorrow" brochure and presentation at the UITP Conference on Sustainable Design. This was also presented at the APTA conference on the environment given in NYC. Tours: A delegation from MetroVal (Valencia Metro, Venezuela) went on a tour through the facility. There are also additional plans for a group of engineering students from Colombia University to tour the Facility. Awards: Applied for and received a "Green Apple" award (honorable mention) from NYC/DOB and the US-EPA for Green Building Design. Design Guidelines: Established Design Guidelines for "Sustainability" for implementation throughout the Capital Program that were a direct result of the Green Design efforts on this project. We propose to submit copies of all the brochures created as part of this outreach program as well as website information for viewing. This project is not the typical project for which LEED NC was originally designed. As a major Metropolitan Transit Agency - the project is very high profile and thus contributes to the expansion of green building into the mainstream. As such, we feel that these efforts should obtain an Innovation & Design credit. Please let us know if these efforts will garner us an additional credit and if not, what we may do to accomplish this under this specific type of facility and ownership. Additionally, we would also like to know what submittals will be necessary to establish sufficient evidentiary information for the USGBC review.

Ruling:

Your education and outreach program is eligible for an innovation point. It meets the general requirements established in the credit ruling dated 9/24/01. To document these strategies in your LEED certification submittal, please include the information from your CIR narrative and provide a copy of the Design Guidelines for Sustainability and other materials. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/22/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Title: Whole Building Double Water Filtration to Obviate the Need for Bottled Water Intent: To minimize or eliminate the use of plastic water bottles in buildings by providing the purity levels afforded by bottled water through comprehensive building water filtration. The bottled water industry has grown substantially in the past decade. About 74% of Americans drink bottled water; one in five drinks only bottled. Demand is outstripping recycling capacity. According to the Container Recycling Institute, each year an ever smaller proportion of plastic bottles are recycled; from 2 out of 5 in the mid \'90s, to only 1 out of 7 today. Seventy million water bottles are disposed of each day, with 60 million going into landfills, oceans or incinerators. Our project plans to implement a two-stage water filtration system that provides water purity equal to or better than bottled water. Implementing water filtration technology is an answer to the severe environmental impact of bottled water, because it reconciles people\'s desire for pure, safe drinking water with the imperative of reducing waste. By installing two-stage water filtration - first at the main (point-of-entry, POE) and then downstream within kitchen cabinets (point-of-use, POU) -- and educating our occupants about the health and environmental advantages of the system, we anticipate a dramatic reduction in the purchase of bottled water in our building and associated waste. The two-stage configuration, and the specific equipment selected, are designed so as to minimize environmental impact by 1) at POE using negligible water for self-cleaning, and 2) at POU achieving significant filter cartridge longevity. Requirements: - Provide building-wide point-of-entry water filtration that removes particulate contamination equal to or smaller than 10 microns; AND - Provide point-of-use water filtration at 0.2 micron (fine enough to remove bacteria) and NSF/ANSI Standard 42 and 53 certified. AND - Educate building occupants about the system, how it works and its substantial environmental benefits. Benefits: - Obviate the need for bottled water by providing high performance and low impact two-stage water filtration that will substantially reduce the amount of plastic water bottles going to waste from our building. - Reduce the exposure to potentially harmful waterborne contaminants for the entire population through universal access to filtered water. - Reduce the energy required to heat water by screening out particulates that over time negatively impact system efficiency. - Reduce the amount of pollutants released in the manufacture and transportation of bottled water attributable to our building. There are 70 million bottles of water consumed in the US per day. Dividing that number by the total population of approximately 306,000,000, means that 23% of the US population is drinking one bottle of water a day. We believe this estimate to be conservative and that widespread adoption of two-stage water filtration could have a much bigger impact, especially in areas with known water quality problems. We estimate that our 1200 apartment project will have 2130 occupants. Therefore, 23% of 2130 = 479 people drinking one bottle of water a day times 365 days/yr = 174,835 bottles for this one building resulting in a reduction of 149,858 (6 out of 7) bottles going to landfill, oceans or incineration. New occupants will be given an orientation session at the time of lease by the property manager explaining the dual system, the POU maintenance requirements and why the cost and environmental impact of bottled water can be avoided in the building. The tenant environmental guideline will also detail the environmental impact of bottled water and describe the system benefits and performance. The filtration system will be a highlighted feature on all leasing and green building tours.

Ruling:

Installation of a water filtration system, with the intent of eliminating the use of plastic water bottles is an acceptable effort for achieving an Innovation in Design credit, as long as calculations and policy/program descriptions are provided as required by posted CIR ruling dated 11/15/2007, showing the quantifiable benefits that may result from the reduction of waste and transportation. Please provide the policy/program document which details the environmental impact of bottled water use and describes the system benefits and performance. Policy/program descriptions must also confirm that the building?provided filtered water will be available at 100% of kitchen sinks throughout the building, and that maintenance of all filtration system components and point?of?use filter replacement will be provided by the building owner per manufacturer\'s guidelines. For core and shell projects, these requirements will need to be part of a legally binding agreement with the tenants, such as a tenant lease or sales agreement. As part of the program/policy document project team will be required to outline an orientation program to educate building occupants about this sustainable feature of the building and the expected use of filtered water from sinks instead of bottled water; consider adding other green features on the building to this orientation. Documentation of the filtration system, education policy, and sales or lease agreement will need to be provided for certification. ***This CIR Ruling has been updated on 9/14/2009*** Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/19/2002
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ecologically Based Landscape Design and Pest Control: The project site is an urban infill site located in Sacramento, California. The project is an office building for the State of California, housing the Department of Education. Prior to the design and construction of the new office building, the site was a surface parking lot with a few trees surrounding the site on the perimeter. Adjacent to the project is a six-story apartment building and across from the site is the California State Capitol mall, a park like setting, with many differing plants and tree species represented. Contained within the project is a small pocket park, which separates the office building from the adjacent apartment building. The park was selected as a site for the State Arts in Architecture program, and a nationally known artist was selected for the art commission. In response to community outreach efforts, and in response to neighborhood concerns about open space, the Design Team for the project worked with the artist to develop a unique response. The team worked on the development of the landscape design using specific features listed below, coupled with the strategy of an ecologically based landscape management and maintenance program. The team also sought to use the project landscape as a means to educate and promote the use of organic based urban landscaping and agricultural farming and the use of beneficial insects as a substitute for pesticides. Features of the Ecologically based Landscape Design and Pest Control include: - An interpretive fountain and sculpture that uses gray water and that reflects the culture and environs of the Sierra Foothills; - Native plant materials, selected for their appropriateness to the climate, low water requirements, adaptation of the native cultural landscape of the region, and aesthetic appeal. Plant material was also selected for its ability to provide habitat for beneficial insects; - Organic landscape specifications including soil mix management, sub-surface drip irrigation, gray water and organic fertilizers; - An irrigation system that utilizes high efficiency drip technology and reduces water consumption by 63%; - A fertilizing and feeding plan, which includes a biological nutrient management using compost tea, injected into the irrigation system; - The project also has a retail component, designated as restaurant space. Once restaurant tenants are identified, the Design Team will work with the tenants to develop a composting process to recycle organic waste streams from the building and the restaurant tenants, including food waste, landscape pruning, etc. - Training of the building and grounds maintenance staff to monitor for insect pests and plant disease. Training the staff to release beneficial insects as the primary means of pest control, and training the staff to use soft pesticides and to avoid toxins. - Educational stations with plaques and graphics delineating the ecological methods utilized, beneficial insect and plant identification and their symbiotic relationships. - Consultation on pest problems and supplying beneficial insects to the project for the duration of the two-year warranty period. Question: Could this interpretive pocket park, developed with neighborhood concerns, educational goals and coupled with organic practices be considered an innovation point?

Ruling:

Yes, this project could attempt an innovation credit by addressing the education value of the "green" features of the park. A previous LEED Interpretation on the issue of an educational program in relation to buildings to achieve an innovation credit: please see Inquiry Number 0121-IDc11-092801. To summarize the earlier ruling, your project must be ACTIVELY instructional by including two of the three following elements: 1) comprehensive signage program to educate; 2) manual, guideline or case study to inform the design of other projects; 3) educational outreach program or guided tour focusing on sustainable living. As outlined in your inquiry, most of these elements are planned or already incorporated into the program in a very comprehensive way that reaches across many credit categories. Rather than focusing on a sustainable building education program as described in the previous inquiries, this project could focus on a sustainable site educational program that highlights green features throughout, as suggested in your narrative. You must be vigilant in your documentation of the measures described and provide adequate photos/drawings and other documentation along with narratives explaining your intent, the requirements, the submittals and the design approach, as directed in the Reference Guide. The opportunity to achieve innovation credits is designed for just such projects that either lie outside the existing LEED credits or exemplify exceptional performance in sustainability.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/7/2002
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Fly Ash Blended Cement We are looking to score one innovation credit for the use of fly ash blended cement. However, we are looking to use approximately 10% of normal, non-blended cement (300 cy out of a total of 3,000 cy)due to coordination and timing issues. If we then use approximately 90% blended cement, would we still be eligible for the innovation credit?

Ruling:

To achieve an environmental benefit, it is critical that fly-ash REPLACE cement content, not just be added as a filler. Adding fly-ash to a concrete mix without reducing cement content has only limited advantages to the environment. It is unclear from the question whether the project is actually off-setting cement use. The Credit Ruling Committee has suggested that a 40% REPLACEMENT of cement with fly-ash would qualify for an innovation credit. Lower levels of fly-ash use are more typical, and would not be considered innovative enough to warrant an innovation point. Note that there are many complexities of fly-ash use with respect to concrete strength requirements that factor into the discussion of what constitutes an innovation. Regardless of the percent used, fly-ash content would count toward MR Credit 4; Recycled Content Materials.Modification Note as of July 1st, 2012: The applicability of this LEED Interpretation has been modified to indicate that it is applicable to LEED 2009 projects. However, USGBC and GBCI will be phasing this Innovation strategy out. While this strategy is acceptable for LEED 2009 it will not be acceptable for LEED 2012 because the environmental benefit(s) of replacing cement with alternative cementitious material will be captured in available credits. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
5/24/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Green Building Educational Component This project intends to provide a two-part educational package as part of its process. This will consist of the following: 1. A display system comprised of small iconographic signs throughout the facility highlighting where green strategies have been employed. These icons will then be complemented by a display panel in the main cafeteria space which highlights what the green building strategies are, and some of the impacts. Rather than put text-based signs throughout the facility, the icons will remind people as they move through the space that there is something green there. All employees go to the cafeteria several times a day, and this way the centralized panel can highlight the environmental impact of each piece of the building. For example an icon at the parking lot can highlight how much the hybrid vehicle parking spaces are reducing emissions. An icon at the toilet rooms can highlight how many gallons of water are going to be saved each year. By having the icons spread throughout the facility we can illustrate how pervasive our green strategies are. 2. A case study book or website, tied in to graphics of the building, which will highlight materials and strategies used throughout the facility. It will be cross-referenced with synergistic efforts made in the owner\'s corporate office center, also under construction and also seeking LEED certification. This resource will include both materials used, design strategies employed, and local suppliers and professionals involed in the project, such as construction entities, local waste recyclers, etc. This case study book or website will be shared with the USGBC and the Pittsburgh Green Building Alliance (GBA). Please review and let us know if this approach will meet the intent of the CIR from 9/24/2001 regarding educational programs for Innovation in Design points, and whether this approach is likely to be awarded a point if submitted.

Ruling:

To meet the requirements for an innovation credit for education, as outlined in previous CIR rulings, signage must be built into the building\'s spaces and comprehensively addresses the green building strategies employed in the project. A case study must inform the design of other buildings based on the success of this project. The strategies described meet this intent. Credits are not awarded through the CIR process and achievement will be based on the documents formally submitted. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/30/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent: "To provide design teams and projects the opportunity to be awarded points for exemplary performance above the requirements set by LEED-CS Green Building Rating System and/or innovative performance in Green Building categories not specifically addressed by the LEED-CS Green Building Rating System." We are presenting this CIR in order to receive guidance about the likely outcome of the proposed Innovation Credit if accomplishments are proven by the certification submittals. INTENT To educate tenants on lifestyle changes that can improve their physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing; build a sense of community; enhance the work environment; and promote alternative modes of transportation. REQUIREMENTS Provide tenants with access to a Working Well Program (WWP) for a minimum of three years. Provide a WWP coordinator on site three days per week. He/she shall be responsible for; organizing all activities, marketing events, conducting monthly special events, and recruiting other wellness experts as required, preparing regular reports for evaluation by management and an annual executive summary highlighting participation and tenant feedback, and delivering a wellness activities plan to the tenants on a monthly basis. SUBMITTALS Provide the letter template signed by the developer declaring that a WWP coordinator has been engaged for a minimum of three years. Provide a copy of the agreement between the Developer and WWP coordinator demonstrating that the Program will be provided for at least three years. If an audit is requested during the certification process: Provide a copy of the annual activity plan, including a brief description of each event and schedule. Provide a copy of tenant agreement sections or information package outlining the structure and costs of the WWP available to the tenant. DESIGN STRATEGIES The Program will serve to educate employees on the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Seminars and activities should be used to promote alternative modes of transportation such as walking and cycling for increased fitness and reduced pollution. The public transportation and bicycle storage and shower facilities available to tenants will be promoted through the WWP, thus increasing their use and furthering the intent of the Sustainable Sites credits. The health and wellness information and activities should be selected such that they increase productivity through improved morale, reduced sick-time, and reduced workplace injuries. Communication between the WWP Coordinator and the Tenant should be ongoing to assess the demand for certain activities and information sessions to increase employee involvement. A tenant representative should be appointed to ensure that the needs of the tenant are being met by the WWP. Environmentally-friendly activities should be emphasized and specialists in sustainable living should be included in the education aspect of the Program. Sample WWP activities and features include:

Ruling:

The applicant is asking whether the proposed Working Well program is likely to be accepted as an innovation credit. Although innovation credits are not awarded through the CIR process, this proposal does not provide adequate justification of the environmental benefits of the program, and the human health benefits do not directly relate to the design, construction or operations of the building, which are the focus of the LEED-CS rating system. As stated in the CIR, the program is provided as an option for all tenants - there is no requirement or guarantee that any will participate. Further, the benefits of alternative transportation are already awarded through existing SSc4 credits. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/19/2002
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Grants for PV Panels The Design Build Team for a government office building in California was given a stipulated sum for the entire scope of the project. In an effort to incorporate green strategies to the project that would otherwise not have economically feasible with the limited budget, the Design Build Team sought out new sources for funding, outside the Project stipulated sum, including federal, state and local grants and industry incentive programs. One identified source was a local utility that would donate photovoltaic panels under the stipulation that the panels had to be incorporated into the architecture, and not just added onto the building. The design team re-designed parts of the exterior, and worked with the exterior building envelope sub-contractors and the PV panel suppliers to develop systems to incorporate the PV panels directly into the exterior curtain wall. As a result, over 300 PV panels were incorporated into the project at no cost to the Owner. The PV wall system includes both structural butt-glazed panels and captured panels, which kept intact the original design intent. Question: Would the seeking out of funding sources for green features be considered an innovation point?

Ruling:

No, securing additional funding for green building features does not constitute an innovation. Rewarding projects that buy down first cost through incentive programs is contrary to the LEED objective of demonstrating green building performance within conventional cost assumptions. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We would like to establish a precedent for using the LEED Innovation in Design (ID) Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical Activity on LEED projects across LEED Rating Systems. 1. Intent of CreditPromote the health and fitness of residents and staff through building design and operation, while achieving synergistic environmental benefits.2. Why this Credit is NeededRegular physical activity is associated with reduced rates of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some cancers and reduced health care costs. Obesity, and with it type 2 diabetes, are epidemic in adults and children, and are rising rapidly in the U.S. These conditions, along with cardiovascular disease and cancer, are leading causes of death and health care costs in the U.S. Physical inactivity and poor diets are second only to tobacco. LEED has taken an early leadership role in banning indoor smoking to control environmental tobacco smoke as a perquisite in 2000. As the leading causes of premature deaths in the U.S. Cardiovascular diseases have also now overtaken infectious diseases as the leading causes of death globally, physical activity in our built environment can help slow society\'s second biggest killer, inactivity.Research has shown that improvements in building design and operation have measurable impacts on occupant physical activity, and are important, alongside neighborhood design, for reducing health problems associated with physical inactivity. 3. LEED Projects Already Approved with ID Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical ActivityThe LEED (ID) Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical Activity has already been implemented and approved on several LEED projects such as Via Verde & Riverside Health Center, which were both LEED NC projects, and 2 Gotham which was a LEED CI project. Sample Submittals for LEED (ID) Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical Activity:http://brightpower.biz/greenbuilding/ID-designforhealth http://www.1100architect.com/ (see "Burn Calories not Energy" in the "Sustainability" section)4. Development of CreditThis ID Credit was developed as part of the Active Design Guidelines (www.nyc.gov/adg) by an interagency team including the Active Design Team, which provides technical assistance to LEED projects to assist them in implementing Active Design and The LEED (ID) Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical Activity on LEED projects.5. Synergistic Benefits in the Design For Health Through Increased Physical Activity Strategies:* Recreation time spent in physical activity rather than TV viewing lowers energy consumption as TVs are projected to overtake refrigerators as the main source of household appliance electricity use in New York State* Elevators routinely account for 3-10% of a building\'s total energy use, by promoting use of pedestrian modes of vertical circulation such as stairs and ramps over motorized modes of vertical circulation such as elevators, escalators, and moving platforms, energy use can be greatly reduced. In Riverside Healthcare, which previously earned this LEED ID Credit Design For Health Through Increased Physical Activity, the facility found that elevator energy use during non-operational times (10 pm to 6 am) was 35% of elevator energy use during building operation times, suggesting an energy savings of up 65%, if elevators are not routinely used. * Energy savings are expected to be a supplement to the other primary benefits of this proposal, which are health benefits for occupants and the surrounding community, and benefits to society in reducing health burdens and health care costs (akin to the LEED Prerequisites for Environmental Tobacco Smoke and credits for Low-VOC finishes).Articles documenting benefits related to Green Building & Physical Activity:http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=77#public_health Quantifiable Benefits Matrix &Associated Reference List:http://brightpower.biz/files/Quantitative%20Benefits%20Matrix.pdf http://brightpower.biz/files/Design%20for%20Health%20-%20Reference%20Lis... 6. Further Information about Health & Active Design in Green BuildingThe Active Design Team recently hosted a webinar from USGBC\'s headquarters in D.C. about the LEED (ID) Credit: Design for Health Through Increased Physical Activity and benefits of physical activity through routine daily use of our built environment.Health and Active Design through Green Building Webinar:https://video.webcasts.com/events/usgb001/37845

Ruling:

This inquiry has also been submitted as a User-Generated Pilot Credit Application and will be reviewed by the Pilot Credit Library Working Group through the pilot credit process. The Working Group evaluation will include an in depth weightings exercise and prioritization. If the credit is approved for use in the Pilot Credit Library, it will be available to all applicable projects and rating system types. If the credit is not approved, it can be revised and resubmitted through the Pilot Credit process, but cannot be resubmitted as a precedent setting LEED Interpretation without major revision.
**Updated 10/1/13 for rating system applicability.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
4/5/2004
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Clerestory to bring natural light into subterranean space: exceptional IEQ Our project is a 250,000SF subterranean sports facility. Due to the site and security constraints, we are unable to incorporate windows in the space. However, the design team feels strongly about the importance of natural light, especially in a sports facility, where users are exercising and relaxing. Therefore, in the design, we introduce 4 clerestories, designed with internal reflectors, along the sports facility to bring in natural light. As a result, the daylight factors of the major interior spaces are as follows: Natatorium: 7% Indoor track: 29% Indoor basketball court: 14% This is remarkable results for an underground facility. the clerestories also serves as fresh air intakes for the mechanical systems, therefore reducing the need of constructing a separate aerial way. We strongly believe that this will be qualified for an Innovation and Design Credit.

Ruling:

The incorporation of daylight is a strategy which is addressed in EQc8 and is a design option in most building types, including underground facilities. It appears that the design strategy outlined will meet the criteria for EQc8.1 for natural light in 75% of regularly occupied spaces and does not warrant a separate credit for innovation. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/3/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Design for Increased Physical Activity Credit Intent: The obesity epidemic is a major health crisis facing the American public, leading to the increased incidence of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease among other ailments. Increased physical activity, as little as two minutes of stair climbing each day, could significantly reduce the rate of obesity in the country. Extensive studies by the Center for Disease Control and other independent researchers* have shown that there are four major elements of building design which encourage greater physical activity: A) Stairs - Signage prompts encouraging the use of the stairs. - Improved stairwell aesthetics through use of color, artwork, music, etc. - Favored central locations for stairwells. B) Access to exercise facilities - Weekly exercise classes - On-site walking trails - Gym or exercise room C) Improved streetscapes - Sidewalks/traffic safety - Comfort lighting - Aesthetic landscaping D) Community location - Urban density - Mixed use - Connectivity of pathways to destinations *Full text of these reports is available via email as files cannot be posted with CIRs. Credit Requirements As LEED already accounts for the items listed in C & D, we propose that the ID credit be earned through meeting 4 of the 6 items listed in A & B. Submittal A LEED-Online letter template including the project compliance narrative and floor plans highlighting the design elements included. Project Approach The Riverside Health Center is a partial renovation and addition project that will provide the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene with a contemporary facility to serve their Health Academy, Nutrition, Primary Care Clinic, STD Clinic, Family Daycare, and School Health programs. The building design will include a centrally located stair, signage prompts containing info on the benefits of taking the stairs. The stairwell itself has been enlarged to encourage greater use, will feature added ventilation, operable windows, and is to be included as a site for expressing the project\'s 1% for the arts. The 1% for arts is a city funded program that matches 1% of a project\'s construction budget towards a public art project. In addition to fulfilling all three stairwell improvements, the building features an exercise room, will offer weekly yoga classes, and includes an on-site community garden with landscaped pathways to encourage outdoor exercise.

Ruling:

Along with statistical data, additions to your approach could earn you an innovation credit. Currently, while the overall intent is laudable, it is unlikely that the proposal described above would earn an innovation credit. To earn an innovation credit, project teams must demonstrate innovative performance in Green Building categories not specifically addressed by the rating system. An example to enhance the approach might include design of the site to ensure that there are sidewalks of some minimum width to promote walking. These innovations need to be comprehensive in nature and have significant, measurable environmental benefits. This proposal focuses on fitness, health, and lifestyle related issues that are generally considered outside the scope of the LEED Rating system; LEED does promote productivity and overall wellness of building occupants. In addition, as written, it is unclear how the project team would demonstrate quantitative performance improvements for environmental benefit (establishing a baseline of standard performance for comparison to the final design). Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
3/21/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 296,000 sf medical center. We are requesting consideration and guidance for a potential Innovation and Design point for the inclusion of a Healing Garden and Outdoor Place of Respite in the design of the building and site. Using criteria from the Green Guide to Healthcare Guideline system we have created a Healing Garden on site that provides patients, visitors, and staff accessible outdoor Places of Respite that takes into account: security and safety, supervised, sun orientation and other microclimatic factors, direct connection to the natural environment and garden spaces, noise of mechanical equipment, accessibility, way finding and orientation, strength and stamina of patients, activity and interest, privacy and security and proximity to building entries and restrooms. The Garden also provides choices and variety in the design of spaces, engaging the senses of sight, sound, touch, smell and is integrated with native plantings and garden elements. The intent of the garden is to provide places for quiet reflection that assist in the process of healing of patients and provide for the physical, emotional and spiritual well being of all users. The garden is sized appropriately to meet the needs of patients. Interior lobbies and public spaces adjacent to the garden space allow for viewing of the garden in passing throughout the day as well as during inclement weather. A growing body of research shows that patients, medical staff and other care givers experience positive health benefits from access to daylight, landscape views and garden spaces. Providing a variety of spaces for people to pause and experience their natural surroundings is an important design and whole-healthcare objective. The spaces are universally accessible and provide a variety of seating areas for both ambulatory and wheelchair users. Suggested Documentation includes: Area Tabulations and ratios that show: - Net program summary. - Site Plan(s) highlighting public outdoor places of respite equal to 5% min. of project net program area. - Floor Plans and site plans highlighting indoor and outdoor places of respite dedicated for staff/occupants use equal to an additional 2% of project net program area. - Garden Plans and sections illustrating orientation, accessibility, proximity to interior services, Plant material types and quantities, hardscape material types, textures, etc.

Ruling:

Although Innovation in Design credits are not awarded through the CIR process, the proposed strategy is similar to LEED for Healthcare SSc9.1 Places of Respite. An innovation credit would be considered based on the requirements of this LEED credit. In addition to the requirements outlined in the inquiry above, please note that there are some additional requirements under LEED for Healthcare. For the complete credit requirements, please see http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=3468.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

We are seeking an Innovation in Design credit for implementation of innovative, environmentally beneficial measures through active intervention in the zoning and land development process of the larger community. In the end, a 16,000 s.f. project was able to leverage over 200,000 s.f. of LEED Gold. Background While St. Stephen\'s was in the design process for its LEED project, a local developer proposed to build on the vacant lot located one property lot away to the south. The project team learned that the developer was preparing to present the building design drawings at an upcoming Harrisburg Planning Commission meeting, during which variances would be requested for significantly exceeding the height and setbacks allowed by city zoning code. St. Stephen\'s publicly opposed providing a variance for these excesses primarily because the neighboring building would cut off access to sunlight that the St. Stephen\'s project team was planning to collect for day lighting and PV arrays. Given the developer\'s and St. Stephen\'s prestige in the community, St Stephen\'s requested a meeting with the developer to discuss the issues to see if the height could be lowered or setbacks aligned with zoning requirements. The outcome was that the developer agreed to meet with the St. Stephen\'s team. Initially the developer brought in his architect to explain the designs. The St. Stephen\'s team also presented its sunshade studies. The developer agreed to examine stepping the new building back between the 5th and 8th stories so that the St. Stephen\'s complex would not be in shadow so often. Ultimately, no accommodations for setbacks were provided and it was acknowledged that the developer had no intention of making it a sustainable or LEED building. Soon thereafter, the developer divulged that the tenant would be Pennsylvania Housing and Finance Authority (PHFA). Resulting LEED Achievement During the time period that followed, St. Stephen\'s thought that there was an opportunity in this to leverage their position and negotiate a greater good by supporting the proposed zoning variances. At the time in 2002, very few PA state agencies were pursuing LEED certification for their buildings, with the exception of DEP. The project team thought that fighting the developer and PHFA might ultimately gain the 16,000 s.f. St. Stephen\'s school daylight, but rather than be "penny wise and pound foolish" the project team realized that there would be a much greater benefit if they could convince a public agency to make greater accommodations that would benefit the larger Harrisburg and Pennsylvania community in the name of environmental responsibility. They believed this could be especially important given that the agency is the PHFA that would deal with the future housing in the state. As a result, the St Stephen\'s project team invited the PHFA representatives to join in the discussions with the developer. During the subsequent meetings, the St. Stephen LEED design team educated the building\'s developer and its tenant, the PHFA, about sustainable design buildings and negotiated a formal agreement. This agreement accomplished 1) a minimum silver rated building for a state agency, 2) a smaller building that was "stepped back" so that it would relate better to the surrounding small and historic buildings within the neighborhood and not leave them all in shadow, 3) higher density in the neighborhood by allowing a smaller setback and taller building than zoning permitted, and 4) greater access to solar energy for the Episcopal school by granting St. Stephen\'s rights to harvest solar energy from the PHFA roof, which is much larger than St. Stephen\'s and would see more daylight than St Stephen\'s would otherwise due to surrounding buildings and trees. As a result of the St. Stephen\'s project team efforts, the developer and PHFA were prompted to enlisted their architect to redesign their project to include sustainable design features and achieve the minimum LEED silver rating that St. Stephen\'s demanded as part of the negotiated agreement, which is why sustainable design became one of the inherent development goals of the PHFA building. The PHFA building ultimately received LEED Gold Certification in September 2005.

Ruling:

The USGBC does not consider this proposal alone to merit an innovation credit. However, a comprehensive public education program on LEED rating system and the benefits of green building is a laudable strategy worthy of an innovation credit. A green education program must meet the requirements of CIR ruling dated 9/24/2001. The proposed narrative outlining the educational outreach program undertaken by the project, can contribute as one of the educational elements. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/1/2013
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can a Green Team strategy that recognizes individuals who opt-in to an environmental awareness program be used to earn innovation credit? The program would utilize outward recognition, regular communication about environmental programs, educational materials, and a method for voting for credits during the LEED process.

Ruling:

Green Team programs and other educational strategies are commendable, and can include various strategies as described in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations and Maintenance, but educational program components that directly contribute to the LEED certification process, such as meetings relating to LEED Certification or credit selection, are not eligible. Please see the educational program description under IOc1.1 for acceptable educational program components. Note that the education program strategies listed in the reference guide are geared toward 1) educating building occupants about how they can learn from the building and implement green practices at home (signage, website, newsletter); 2) visitors/general public who can learn about the building and its practices (tours, outreach programs); or 3) other building professionals who can apply the strategies of this building on other buildings (tours, case studies). At least two ongoing, actively educational components must be included. Each Innovation in Operations strategy is eligible for a maximum of one point. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/27/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent of credit: ---- Reduce operations related carbon footprint and encourage organizations associated with LEED projects to do likewise. Requirements for compliance: ---- Identify operational sources of carbon emissions not otherwise addressed by LEED. Establish the operational carbon footprint of the occupants of the LEED project verified by a recognized authority. (See CIR dated 6/29/06 for list of authorities). Obtain carbon offsets for the carbon footprint associated with operational sources of carbon emissions equal to or greater than 50% over 2 years**. Submittals: ---- 1. Signed letter template declaring that offsets equivalent to at least 50% of operational carbon emission loads associated with air travel, car travel, and natural gas for a period of at least two years have been obtained. 2. Narrative describing the project\'s approach to addressing carbon loads. 3. Calculation used to determine carbon emissions, resulting equivalence data, and quantity of offset measures required. 4. Certification document from a recognized source of carbon offset credits. Design Approach (Strategies) / Narrative: ---- Reliable analysis of construction related life cycle carbon emissions is difficult to obtain and verify at this time. Emissions data related to operations are more readily available and recognized authorities exist that can quantify the carbon emissions related to operations based on established metrics. This credit addresses carbon emissions other than those addressed by LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power. The following steps describe the actions needed to achieve this credit: Research currently available carbon emission measurement standards and offset options. Identify recognized service providers. (See CIR dated 6/29/06 for list of recognized authorities) List carbon emission sources specific to operations associated with the project in question. Run calculations on offset measures needed. Obtain carbon offset credits at least equivalent to 50% of operational carbon emission loads associated with natural gas, air travel, and car travel for a period of at least two years. This innovation credit meets the three basic criteria for innovation credits as described in the LEED Reference Guide: 1. Quantitative performance improvement: A baseline evaluation of the operational carbon footprint using methods specified by a recognized authority (Green-e for instance) establishes a starting point and is used to calibrate the quantity of carbon offset measures needed. 2. Comprehensive program: The program addresses business related carbon emissions related to air travel, car travel, and natural gas, not covered by LEED and augmenting similar efforts related to electrical loads achieved by meeting LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power requirements. 3. Applicability to other projects: This innovation credit provides an outline for any organization interested in addressing their operational carbon footprint. Similar ID credits related to post occupancy efforts are listed in the USGBC\'s Innovation & Design Credit Catalog (1 December 2007), including credits addressing: Green Cleaning; Monitoring Threatened & Endangered Species; Donation and Protection of Open Space (not assoc. with project site); Alternative Transportation Management Plan; Employee Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions; Food composting; Occupant recycling program; Waste reduction operations; Work at home program; LEED post-occupancy performance evaluation; Employee wellness; Educational program; Student report; Carbon offset; Environmentally preferable services; and Off site environmental benefit. ** Time period and % based on those established for the LEED-CI v2.0 EAc4 Green Power credit.

Ruling:

The applicant submitted a CIR proposing an innovation and design credit in which projects would offset the emissions associated with tenant space operations. While this proposal does demonstrate environmental benefits, it cannot be approved at this time due to the complexities surrounding carbon accounting. USGBC is performing research in this area and will update this CIR ruling as necessary. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
6/22/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Intent: Implement a "Green Office Program" for building tenants who commit and prove they are operating as a "Green Office". The program will encourage tenants to operate more sustainably even if they are not performing a renovation (LEED-CI) for their office space. The goal is to provide method for tenants to move into the direction of sustainable operation, and with supporting documents showing achievement, be rewarded by the property management office. This will also encourage tenants to perform conduct cost-benefit analysis for improvements that can be achieved at nominal and/or no cost. Even credits that have a cost may still have that cost returned through reduced operating expenses. The "Green Office Program" is promoted through the building tenant guide and distributed by building managers, which encourages tenants to identify and implement no-cost and low-cost alternatives to operating in a standard indoor office environment. Scored on a scale of 100, offices are evaluated in seven categories: Energy Efficiency, People & Atmosphere; Travel & Commuting; Reduce, Reuse & Recycle; Cleaning; Remodeling & Construction; and LEED. When a specific strategy or improvement has been implemented, participating tenants earn "Leaf Credits." If an office achieves "70 Leaf Credits", it is then designated as a GREEN OFFICE. Here are a few items (entire program will be submitted with ID): Energy: - Set computers to "energy save" mode - Lower blinds in summer; raise blinds in winter - Install occupancy light sensors - Replace End of Life computer monitors with Energy Star Equipment - Set "sleep mode" for office equipment - Install compact fluorescent/low mercury light wherever possible People and Atmosphere: -Organize office employees to participate in a sustainability-focused community project once per year -Keep you local office employees updated quarterly about what green efforts you have achieved, your future sustainable goals, and how they can assist in reaching those goals Travel & Commuting: - Instead of traveling for meetings, reduce emissions by encourage teleconferencing and videoconferencing when possible - Ensure 25% of employees carpool or use mass transit to commute to work Reduce/Re-use/Recycle: - Use mugs and tumblers to save waste on disposable cups and plastic bottles - Participate in E-recycle Day for buildings annual e-recycle drive - Transition from petroleum-based or non-compostable products (ex: Styrofoam) to biodegradable products - Do not order any bottled water. Procure bottle-less water coolers to provide cool and hot filtered municipal water Remodeling & Construction: - Certify your office space as LEED-CI - Standardize workspace configuration to accommodate future change that will minimize remodeling and construction - Shift from "closed single offices" to efficient "open-office work plans" Requirements: Every 2 years, the tenant office manager would submit a scorecard to the property manager listing "green opportunities" achieved. Supporting documentation must be provided to achieve the credit. The tenant representative would also be required to attend quarterly building management/tenant meetings to updates to "Green Office Tenant Guidelines" and how they can promote sustainable office/business operation. As you can see, our goal is not to replace LEED-CI. Our program will not only encourage tenants seek LEED-CI, but also help grow our sustainable culture among building occupants beyond the built environment. Many tenants want to operate more sustainably. This program will be their guide.

Ruling:

The described approach would qualify for an Innovation in Operations point due to the comprehensive and extensive education and outreach to building occupants and tenants around sustainability issues. Please note that this initiative falls under the umbrella of green education, and only one education-related IO point can be awarded per project. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
3/21/2006
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Exemplary performance in Landscape & Exterior Design to Reduce Heat Islands / Non-Roof. Intent: The intent of this proposed Innovation in Design credit(s) is to show exemplary performance as it pertains to Heat Island mitigation. The project is a Campus Dining facility located on a 3 acre site with heavy pedestrian traffic and thru-way circulation. The sought innovation in design is for taking 2 incremental steps above the 30% LEED compliance totaling 98% High-Albedo surfaces across the entire 3 acre site. Design Approach: The project is proposing to use Concrete paving with an initial reflectance of .4-.5 for 98%, or 36,852 sq.ft., of the sites impervious non-roof surfaces. Only 2%, or 863 sq.ft,. of the site will be asphalt paving. Please note also that 18.5% of this already compliant concrete paving will have additional shading by proposed native vegetation. Lastly, the roof surface is covered by a High Albedo LEED compliant roof surface for a total 91% of the roof surface equaling 16% greater than LEED compliance. This makes 65,604.5 sq.ft. of the 3 acre sites total impervious surface of 69,230 sq.ft. constructed with High Albedo materials for a grand total of 95% (this does not include the added benefit of shading by trees 18.5%). Based on the LEED intent for these credits, we feel as though we are good candidates for (2) or more innovation points for exemplary performance. Please advise.

Ruling:

One Innovation Credit for Exemplary Performance is available for LEED-NC Version 2.1 projects that demonstrate 60% or more of the total non-roof impervious surfaces have a reflectance of 0.30 or higher. The project team should consider alternatives to reduce impervious surfaces that could reduce storm water management and heat island while still meeting the hardscape design intent. Utilizing such a design strategy can reduce both heat island and stormwater runoff and potentially increase the project\'s points toward certification. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

DESCRIPTION Proposed achievement of this credit involves production of a fifteen minute video overview of the resort\'s LEED and green features. INTENT Previous rulings have indicated a minimum of two of the following solutions were required to achieve a point for public education within the Innovation and Design category: - Comprehensive signage program - Development of a manual, guideline, or case study - Educational outreach program or guided tour It is the intent of this CIR to seek a ruling that would permit the use of digital media (i.e., video) to serve, as an alternate path to all of the above. REQUIREMENTS Utilize digital media to expand upon the delivery of public education through: - Providing context to the LEED plaque (to be located in the lobby) by playing back the video on a flat screen adjacent to the plaque. This will provide expansive meaning to a plaque that will be viewed by thousands of people each year - including many who are not familiar with USGBC or LEED. Additionally, this would also reduce the traditional use of lobby paper products to tell the green story. Such paper products can sometimes go underutilized and/or are quickly discarded. - Educating visitors on the LEED and non-LEED green attributes of the resort by the daily and multiple playbacks (minimum 4 times each day) of the video on the resort\'s dedicated in-room television channel. This would achieve USGBC\'s goal of educating visitors to the project. - Educating new employees by playback of the video as part of their initial training and orientation. This would achieve USGBC\'s goal of educating employees. - Reaching a larger audience beyond those traveling to the resort by featuring the video on the resort\'s website and the corporation\'s environmental initiatives website. In essence the video provides a virtual, as opposed to physical guided tour, of the project without expanding facilities unnecessarily in order to conduct tours of the back of house physical plant. This would complement USGBC\'s goal of sharing the successes of this project with others who may not have the opportunity to visit the project. SUBMITTALS LEED Design Application Milestone: - Proposed location of lobby LEED plaque and adjacent flat screen - Story treatment/synopsis LEED Construction Application Milestone submittals would include: - Shooting script - Shooting schedule - Schedule of daily playback on the in-room resort channel - Web address/proposed design for the resort and environmental affairs websites that would host the video.

Ruling:

The proposed innovation credit is based on using digital media, in the form of a video, which will provide information about the green features of the building. While commendable, this approach alone does not substantiate a comprehensive green education program to warrant achievement of an innovation credit. An additional strategy should be adopted, and must be actively instructional, such as an educational outreach program or guided tour, or a comprehensive signage program built into the building\'s respective spaces. Please refer to the established requirements for this as noted in the LEED-NC v2.1 CIR ruling dated 09/24/2001. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
2/10/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following proposed innovation in design credit is intended to demonstrate that Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing (CSST) designed for distribution of natural gas and LPG (propane Gas) systems saves time, reduces cost, and is environmentally friendly where integrated in a holistic approach to a building project. This innovative technology is the only standard based natural gas and LPG (propane gas) system manufactured, designed sized and installed under the ANSI LC1 certification process. CSST is IAPMO, ICC and CSA listed; IFGC, UPC and NFPA-54 approved as a gas-piping material. This system is installed with fewer fittings eliminating leak paths in the natural gas or LPG (propane gas) system, thus making the system safer within a structure. The inherent flexibility and light weight will reduce costs and help prevent job related accidents. Most manufactures\' of CSST incorporate a fitting which uses a metal to metal seal with no gaskets or O-rings and features which allows for maintaining of the integrity of the Polyethylene jacket protecting the system from corrosion and harsh environments. The Polyethylene jacket, as required by ANSI LC1, is constructed to meet the ASTM E84 requirement for Fire /Smoke (25/50) making the system safer in the event of fire. This innovative technology eliminates the need for welding of natural gas and LPG piping and the dangers associated with such procedures, such as toxic fumes from welding gases, flux and brazing rods and smoke and soot caused by welding. This technology reduces respiratory problems associated with inhaling the toxic fumes resulting from welding of natural gas and LPG piping and eliminates the dangers of fire associated with welding of natural gas and LPG piping. It also eliminates personal injury associated with the use of welding and threading equipment. It is our intent to submit for this credit as a system which exceeds the LEED-NC performance as related to a safer environment during construction and safer system within a structure, for the life of the structure.

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification as to whether the use of Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing for distribution of natural gas and LPG warrants the award of an Innovation in Design credit. While the benefit of reduced exposure for construction workers and building occupants are laudable, this concern is addressed in EQ Credit 3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan - During Construction. As stated on page 325 of the NCv2.2 Reference Guide, "This credit is not eligible for exemplary performance under the Innovation in Design Section". Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/20/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Intent To reduce environmental impacts of print infrastructure through minimizing energy usage, greenhouse gas emissions, and solid waste generation. Challenge: Document printing contributes to office energy consumption. Office equipment accounts for 4% of the electricity consumption in office buildings (Energy Information Administration 2008). On average, companies have one device for every 2.2 workers (Global e-Sustainability Initiative 2008). On average, devices are used only 1-2 percent (about 15 minutes) of a typical day (Xerox data, compiled from thousands of on-site visits and interviews with more than 100,000 people). A large enterprise may have hundreds or thousands of devices. Each year, Americans generate millions of tons of waste in our homes and communities (U.S. EPA). Every year, the United States generates approximately 230 million tons of "trash"--about 4.6 pounds per person per day (Annenberg Media). Solution: Print infrastructure optimization is an opportunity for improved building operational efficiency, in which multiple personal and single function devices are replaced with shared, networked multifunction devices. We propose the incorporation of Print Infrastructure Optimization into building operation as a means to reduce the environmental impact of office-related equipment. We aim to reduce lifecycle energy consumption by at least 20% from the baseline. We aim to reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions by at least 20% from the baseline. We aim to reduce lifecycle solid waste by at least 20% from the baseline. Approach Process: Assessment & Analysis - Print infrastructure assessment will be performed to determine the current and optimized product mix and usage. In addition, a streamlined lifecycle-based evaluation that includes raw material extraction and processing, use of equipment and consumables, and solid waste generation shall be used. The methodology used to develop the life cycle data sets should be consistent with ISO 14040. At a minimum, include results for life cycle energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and solid waste. Data indicate that print devices of similar technology and speed bands have similar characteristics and can be aggregated together (EuP Preparatory Studies for Imaging Equipment). This approach will enable a more efficient process for collection and analysis of data. Baseline Current number of devices Establish Baseline for Lifecycle Energy Use Establish Baseline for Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Establish Baseline for Lifecycle Solid Waste Generation Design Case Optimized number of devices Establish Design Case Lifecycle Energy Usage Establish Design Case for Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Establish Design Case Lifecycle Solid Waste Generation Proposed Submittals: Print infrastructure assessment w/ recommendations Narrative that declares that you have implemented assessment recommendations Calculated results of Print Infrastructure Optimization Lifecycle Energy Usage Reduction of 20% - Baseline vs. Design Case Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction of 20% - Baseline vs. Design Case Lifecycle Solid Waste Generation Reduction of 20% - Baseline vs. Design Case

Ruling:

An Innovation effort that uses life cycle assessment is an appropriate effort for a LEED point. The project team must perform ISO 14040 life cycle assessments on at least 5% of the volume of annual purchases within one of the LEED procurement categories (ongoing consumables, durable goods, or facilities alterations and additions) per the LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance Reference Guide, page 496. If printer purchases comprise less than 5% of the volume of annual purchases within the durable goods category, the team must identify additional goods to include in a life cycle assessment study. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
3/15/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Prior to submitting the full Template and supporting documentation for this Innovation & Design Process Credit, we would like to request an evaluation to ensure we are on the right path for this credit. Our project is a mixed-use facility with residential units at 7 levels, retail at the ground level and parking below grade. We plan to integrate an Educational Outreach Program, following the guidelines as defined in IDc1.1 inquiry dated 9-20-01. The following is the Outline of our Program: I. Interpretive Signage Program A signage permanent signage program will be designed and installed to communicate the major sustainable design aspects of the project to the visitors and customers of the facility, highlighting the various sections of the LEED program - Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Materials and Resources, Energy & Atmosphere and Indoor Environmental Quality a. Retail - Signs to be located at the Paseo area between the two buildings and will highlight the sustainable design features of the project, including: 1. Water Efficiency - reduced water consumption and irrigation by captured ground water 2. Stormwater reduction and Heat Island reduction: Rooftop gardens and Green Roof - reduces Stormwater quantity, reduces heat islands at the roof and provides the residents with a gardening plot. 3. Recycled materials & low VOC materials as well as Construction waste diversion from landfills. 4. Alternative Transportation - preferred parking for HOV, secured bicycle parking for residents, adjacency to bus stops and ferry service. A signage program will be designed and installed to communicate energy and water efficiency data on a monthly basis to the residents. The intent is to encourage residents to make a concerted effort towards reducing energy and water consumption. b. Residential - Signs to be located at Residential Common Lobby Areas II. Project Manual for Sustainable Design features for the project a. Manual will include narratives and supporting graphics documenting the design approach for the 5 sections of the LEED NC v2.2 Submission b. The LEED Checklist and Templates submitted to the USGBC will be included in this Manual for reference by others. III. Educational Outreach Program a. The Home Owners Association will sponsor Educational Programs (Organic Gardening, Organic Cooking, Sustainable Living Practices, Energy Consumption Reduction) will be held at the facility in the meeting room for residents to further their awareness of sustainable living.

Ruling:

The provided description has met the precedent set forth in CIR Ruling dated 9/24/01. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/24/2001
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Credit Title: Green Building EducationINTENT: To provide public education focusing on green building strategies and solutions.REQUIREMENTS AND SUBMITTALS: Credit 1.1 (1 point) Provide permanent educational displays illustrating at least one component of each of the five major green building categories in the LEED rating system:Sustainable SitesWater EfficiencyEnergy and AtmosphereIndoor Environmental QualityMaterials and Resources- Provide narrative to describe the intended green building education program that will use the displays.- Provide narrative to describe the selected green building educational displays.- Provide design drawings of the educational displays and their locations in the building.Credit 1.2 (1 point) Provide educational outreach focusing on sustainable living and building practices to serve the general public.- Provide education program with identifiable tasks and outcomes geared toward sustainable living and building practices.- Develop an ongoing education program to provide access to practical methods for homeowners and others for sustainable living and building practices.SUMMARY OF REFERENCED STANDARDS: There are no such referenced standards for this credit.GREEN BUILDING CONCERNS: Public education is necessary to encourage green building practices in public programs, private development, and residential communities. The purpose of this innovative credit is to encourage public education in green building projects and provide a strategy to meet that goal.Mission Statement: To inspire people to live more sustainably, using flexible and achievable standards for building and landscaping practices in such a way as it will protect our local and regional natural resources.DESIGN APPROACH: Even though this credit is designed with an environmental education center in mind, the principles of public education can be applied to either public or private structures. For example, office buildings, although a private enterprise, have employees coming and going each day. A building that is didactic and is reinforced with clearly defined educational displays can have a significant impact on the user\'s understanding of the built and natural environment. Transforming thoughtful design solutions into educational opportunities is the intent of this credit. Also, disseminating effective and practical information on sustainable living and building practices to the general public is a fundamental way to make changes in our society.

Ruling:

To take advantage of the educational value of the green building features of a project and to earn a LEED point, any approach should be ACTIVELY instructional. Two of the following three elements must be included in the educational program:1) A comprehensive signage program built into the building\'s spaces to educate the occupants and visitors of the benefits of green buildings. This program may include windows to view energy-saving mechanical equipment or signs to call attention to water-conserving landscape features.2) The development of a manual, guideline or case study to inform the design of other buildings based on the successes of this project. This manual will be made available to the USGBC for sharing with other projects.3) An educational outreach program or guided tour could be developed to focus on sustainable living, using the project as an example. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
1/23/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a three story laboratory facility in the city of Port St. Lucie Florida. The project has used an exterior coating system with a higher heat reflectance value than the values of conventional coatings. This credit interpretation request is to inquire about submitting the coating system used, to apply for a credit for reduced heat island effect for non-roof surfaces. The Total Solar Reflectance (TSR) values of the exterior coatings used in the building were tested using a D&S reflectometer according to ASTM C1549-04. The TSR value of the BML-01 "White" color used was 82.9% and the TSR value for the PPG522-3 "Water Chestnut" color used was 74.5%. To prove merit for one point under LEED, we have followed the guidelines of the LEED reference guide to document Sustainable Sites Credit 7.1-Heat island effect non-roof. The baseline case and design case were calculated using the exterior wall surface area and 50% of the site hardscape area. The baseline case was calculated using 43.7% solar reflectance for conventional beige paint to match the color used in the building and 35% for new gray concrete hardscape. The design case was calculated using 74.5% solar reflectance for the Water Chestnut coating used and 5% for new asphalt hardscape. Using Ecotect and site specific data the building was modeled with the correct north orientation. Ecotect calculated the incident solar radiation that strikes the north, south, east and west walls, and the hardscape surfaces annually in Wh. The incident solar radiation value for the four facades and the hardscape were added, and multiplied by the solar reflectance values to determine the site reflected solar energy. The analysis showed that 61% of solar energy would have been reflected using conventional paint and new gray concrete, but instead we are reflecting 77% of the total solar energy incident on the site using a coating with a higher heat reflectance value. We would like to know if this approach of using exterior coatings with higher reflectance values to lower heat island effect on non-roof surfaces will be acceptable to document one innovation in design point.

Ruling:

The project is proposing to earn an innovation point for using high heat reflectance value exterior wall surfaces. Please note that Innovation & Design points are not awarded through the CIR process. As described, this approach is not eligible for an ID credit at this time. Currently, no standard methodology, metric, or baseline assessment exists for exterior wall heat island effect reduction. The proposed methodology (EcoTect modeling), metric (solar reflectance), and baseline do not address heat island effect reduction as currently outlined in the LEED Rating System (using solar reflectance index - SRI). Furthermore, as this proposal is suggesting a modified exemplary performance compliance path, the requirements of SSc7.1 would first need to be met. Based on the details provided above, it is not clear if SSc7.1 would be achieved. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/5/2004
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Ozone System in Lap Pool and Spa: exceptional IEQ Our project is a sports facility with a 6-lane, 25m swimming pool and 2 spas. Instead of the conventional chlorine system, we are using an ozone system to treat the water. The Ozone system has the following advantage: - Destroys bacteria, mold and mildew - Eliminates spores, yeasts, fungus and inactivates viruses - Aids the removal of minerals such as iron and manganese - Water is softer and has neutral pH - Leaves no unpleasant chemical or smell, no chloramines build-up, the by-products of ozone are heat and pure oxygen - No irritation to the eyes, nasal passages or throat - Will not cause dry skin, bleached hair or faded swimwear - Reduce chlorine consumption to a minimum, saving money on maintenance, and avoid storing such toxic chemical on site. To summarize, the system reduces the use of chlorine greatly (50-75% depending on splash limit). Unlike chlorine, ozone leaves no unpleasant odors or residual chemicals in the pool and spas. It eliminates the problems of red and irritated eyes, dry skin, faded swim wear and other problems associated with chlorine. We believe that this system has significantly increased the indoor environment quality of the project, especially when the pool and spas are frequently used being in a sports facility instead of a private residence. And a large amount of occupants will be benefited. Therefore, we would like to use this for one of our Innovation and Design Credits. Please advice on the feasibility.

Ruling:

The proposed strategy, if incorporated properly, may warrant an innovation credit. The use of an ozonation system that is properly sized and integrated into the swimming pool treatment system will allow ozone to act as the primary oxidizer and disinfectant. Since there is no uniform standard which has been established for ozonation of pools, ozone design criteria for disinfection in the United States is based primarily around US EPA Drinking Water Guidelines. Dose rate values between .4 mg-O3/l are normally cited and .8 mg-O3/l is commonly used. While LEED encourage approaches that reduce the use of toxic chemicals, additional information is required to provide a complete assessment of credit achievement in this case. Please describe limited reduction of chlorine (e.g., state if regulations require a minimum level of chlorine), and provide detailed explanation and proof of substantial environmental benefits (quantified as much as possible). See IDc1.1 CIR review dated 5/21/2003 for further guidance on this issue including appropriate documentation. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
9/26/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

INTENT We believe that the proposed storm water management system design exceeds LEED\'s storm water goals and intent in both quantity and quality by 1) maintaining on-site infiltration and managing additional off-site storm water runoff, and 2) improving water quality by removing pollutants from on-site and off-site storm water runoff. Additional measures were taken to assure the storm water management system was designed to maximize treatment of storm water runoff from adjacent properties. DESIGN APPROACH The proposed new construction is located on 13.7 previously developed acres consisting mainly of hard-turf soccer fields, gravel parking, and a small abandoned building. Existing site best management practice\'s (BMP\'s) consist of one vegetated swale and there are no rate or volume control measures. Adjacent to the site, along the south and east borders, are 5.0 acres of residential development and county road that currently receive no treatment. The proposed 13.7 acre site and the adjacent off site 5.0 acres share a 48" culvert located in the southeast corner of the proposed site. The proposed on-site storm water management system consists of 4 infiltration/settlement basins, 2 vegetated swales and 1 detention pond. The system is designed to route water from the building roof and parking lots through pre-treatment infiltration basins located on the east and west ends of the parking lot. Water from the west end parking lot infiltration basin will outlet to a vegetated swale which will flow to the detention pond on the southern edge of the site. Water from the east end parking lot infiltration basin will outlet to another infiltration basin near the southeast corner of the museum, which then outlets to a vegetated swale before entering the detention pond on the southern edge of the site. The additional 5.0 off-site acres of storm water runoff will be rerouted to enter the site at the infiltration basin at the southeast corner of the site. As explained above, after treatment in this infiltration basin the runoff flows through a vegetated swale and in to the detention pond. All storm water will then pass through one additional infiltration basin before exiting the site. PROPOSED COMPLIANCE After the construction of the project and its site appurtenances are completed, the impervious areas of the site will consist of a 0.9 acre building footprint, 1.4 acre parking lot, and 1.2 acres of trails, patios, turfed surfaces, and sidewalks. The remaining 10.2 acres of the site will consist of various types of native and adaptive vegetation along with BMP\'s. The 5.0 off-site acres will be rerouted to be incorporated in the BMP\'s of the proposed site. The project team intentionally designed the storm water management system to maximize treatment of on-site storm water runoff and to handle 5.0 additional acres of runoff (approximately 35% additional area) from an off-site residential area and section of county road currently receiving zero treatment. Through hydraulics/hydrology models we have confirmed that the site will reduce peak discharge rates for the 1 and 2 year 24 hour storm events by 30%-15% respectively. The site will also reduce discharge volumes for the 1 and 2 year 24 hour storm events by 50% and 25% respectively. Through water quality models we have confirmed that the site will reduce the total suspended solids by 85% and total phosphorus by 60%. We are confident the combined interaction between the infiltration basins, swales and the detention pond assures that the project site exceed LEED goals and intent for both storm water quantity and quality. PROPOSED SUBMITTAL Site Plan Landscape Plan Hydrology Model Report As a result of our efforts, we believe that the design and implementation of the project\'s storm water management system and the treatment of 5.0 additional acres of off-site runoff should be granted 1 LEED ID point. Please confirm compliance.

Ruling:

As the described measures appear to meet credit intent while exceeding credit requirements an Innovation and Design credit could be achieved. Please provide detailed plans and calculations clearly illustrating how the measures on the project site meet credit requirements while treating an increased volume of at least 35% from offsite sources. Please be certain to document how the offsite water will be channeled to the site and that this offsite project will be completed concurrent with the completion of the project seeking certification, or that appropriate permits have been obtained and funds have been allocated for the completion of this offsite project. Please provide complete stormwater calculations for the offsite area, illustrating, among other things, that this offsite area will not overload the onsite systems.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
3/21/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a 103,000 sf addition and remodeling of a healthcare facility that will provide acute care for cancer patients. We are requesting information and guidance for a proposed Innovation and Design point for the re-alignment and re-meandering of an existing creek that borders our campus boundaries. Our facility has entered into partnership with the local watershed management district authority to provide for the re-alignment and re-meandering of Minnehaha Creek - (Minnehaha Creek is a tributary of the Mississippi River located in Hennepin County, Minnesota that extends from Lake Minnetonka in the west and flows east for 22 miles (35 km) through several suburbs west of Minneapolis and then through south Minneapolis. Including Lake Minnetonka, the watershed for the creek covers 181 square miles (469 km

Ruling:

The applicant is requesting guidance and direction regarding a proposed Innovation and Design credit for the re-alignment and re-meandering of an existing creek that borders the project\'s campus boundaries, a strategy which does not have precedent in LEED. It is possible, however, for stream restoration to be an alternative compliance path to meet Sustainable Sites Credit 5.1, Protect or Restore Habitat or, potentially, an Innovation and Design credit for exemplary performance within this credit. For innovation or exemplary performance strategies that are not currently covered in the reference guide, there are three basic criteria (please refer to the complete guidelines in the LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide). The project must demonstrate quantitative performance improvements, the process or specification must be comprehensive, and the formula that the project develops must be applicable to other projects. The proposed strategy does appear to be comprehensive, however, is not quantitative and may not be applicable to other projects. The project team is encouraged to further develop their strategy. Stream habitat quality is typically measured through use of state and federal guidelines describing common indicators and measuring criteria. The most readily identifiable indicators and criteria address stream bank stability, the presence of pools and riffles, and the extent of stream vegetation cover. Suggesting documentation for capturing an ID credit through this strategy include a stream monitoring plan to address these issues. Also, the project team is encouraged to seek out references such as the USGS WRI Report 98-4052 Revised Methods for Characterizing Stream Habitat in the National Water-Quality Assessment Program.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
2/6/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The following Innovation & Design CIR is being submitted to assess whether the following criteria could qualify for an ID credit if all standards are met and documentation received: Intent - To provide a mechanism to support novel ideas to improve the environment at Union College. Through a competitive grant-based initiative, members of the Union College community have access to a $16,000 per year pool of funding to either make Union operations more sustainable or to conduct research that will make specific contributions to sustainability at the regional, national or global scale. Grant proposals are required to detail rationale, a project/research plan, anticipated outcome, detailed budget, and timeline, and are rated based on the benefit to environmental sustainability and feasibility. In the 2008-2009 academic year, ten different projects proposed by students, staff and faculty were awarded between $500 and $2000. With the opening of a new USustain headquarters located in Wold Science Center, the office of President Stephen Ainlay has committed to funding for two more academic years. Projects that directly impact the design and operations of the Wold Science Center or research projects that would be undertaken at the Wold Science Center will be especially encouraged. Requirement - Union will support grassroots sustainability ideas for the period 2009-2011. Supported projects will include specific reporting guidelines and communication procedures. The period of funding shall cover a period of no less than two academic years, for a total monetary amount of $48,000. Submittals - Presidential Green Grant RFP (Sept. 2008); Summaries of 2008-2009 proposals funded by Presidential Green Grants.

Ruling:

The innovation credit is based on the merits of the Union College providing funding in support of grassroots sustainability ideas that can impact the operations of the Union, or support research that contributes to sustainability at the regional, national or global scale. While the grant program is clearly focused on environmental issues and is commendable, it is unclear how this directly correlates to the design, construction or operations of the LEED project itself. It should be noted that for the LEED for New Construction rating system, innovation credits are awarded for green building strategies (not covered in the rating system) that demonstrate a comprehensive approach with significant, measurable environmental benefits. If the grant program was specifically (and only) focused on making the operations of the LEED project more sustainable, it may be possible to earn an innovation credit if specific measures were adopted based on the LEED for Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance rating system for example. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
10/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Can a project earn ID credit for being in a LEED ND neighborhood? What level of certification or stage or review must the project have completed?

Ruling:

Yes, a project can earn ID credit for being in a LEED for Neighborhood Development certified project. The LEED-ND project must be certified, not just registered. LEED-ND projects at any certification level (Certified through Platinum) and any stage of certification (Stage 1, 2, or 3) are eligible.
**Update October 1, 2013 - The ruling below is no longer valid for project registered after 7/1/2013. As many prerequisites and credits within LEED-ND and LEED-NC address similar concepts, simply locating a NC project within LEED-ND neighborhood is not considered innovative and in some cases, can lead to double-counting the use of the same strategy in both Rating Systems.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
7/1/2016
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

If a building has earned U.S. Zero Waste Certification, can that certification be used to document LEED Operations and Maintenance credits?

Ruling:

Yes, if a building has earned USZWB certification and the scope of the project (i.e. project boundary) is the same as a project pursuing LEED Operations and Maintenance certification, the USZWB certification can be used to document the following LEED credits, provided the corresponding USZWBC credit is earned. A scorecard for the U.S. Zero Waste Business Certification must be provided to demonstrate specific credit achievement.

LEED EB: O+M 2009
MR prerequisite 2: Solid Waste Management Policy; USZWBC includes a mandatory Zero Waste Policy
MR credit 6: Solid Waste Management – Waste Stream Audit; Zero Waste Analysis, Credit 1
MR credit 7: Solid Waste Management - Ongoing Consumables; both Diversion, Credit 1 and Hazardous Waste Prevention, Credit 5
Innovation in Operations credit 1 for Exemplary Performance if at least 95% diversion is achieved

LEED v4
MR prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (waste policy portion only); USZWBC includes a mandatory Zero Waste Policy
MR credit: Solid Waste Management – Ongoing; both Diversion, Credit 1 and Hazardous Waste Prevention, Credit 5
Innovation credit for Exemplary Performance if at least 95% diversion is achieved

Campus Applicable
Yes
Internationally Applicable:
Yes

LEEDuser expert

Ashwini Arun

WSP
Senior Sustainability Manager

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