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LEED v2009
Existing Building Operations
Energy and Atmosphere

Existing Building Commissioning—Investigation and Analysis

LEED CREDIT

EBOM-2009 EAc2.1: Existing building commissioning - investigation and analysis 1-2 points

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Rivion
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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

Option 1. Commissioning Process
  • Develop a retrocommissioning, recommissioning or ongoing commissioning plan for the building’s major energy-using systems.
  • Conduct the investigation and analysis phase.
  • Document the breakdown of energy use in the building.
  • List the operating problems that affect occupants’ comfort and energy use, and develop potential operational changes that will solve them.
  • List the identified capital improvements that will provide cost-effective energy savings and document the cost-benefit analysis associated with each.

OR

Option 2. ASHRAE Level II Energy Audit
  • Conduct an energy audit that meets the requirements of American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), Level II, Energy Survey and Analysis. [Europe ACP: EN 16247]
  • Document the breakdown of energy use in the building.
  • Perform a savings and cost analysis of all practical measures that meet the owner’s constraints and economic criteria, along with a discussion of any effect on operations and maintenance procedures.
  • List the identified capital improvements that will provide cost-effective energy savings and document the cost-benefit analysis associated with each.

Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

Europe ACP: EN 16247
Projects in Europe may use the energy audit procedure defined in EN 16247-2:2014 with a level of detail consistent with the scope of the credit. [view:embed_resource=page_1=4649824]
Credit substitution available
You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.
Pilot Alternative Compliance Path Available
This credit has an alternative compliance path available for the use of ISO 50001: Energy Management Systems. For more information see Pilot ACP 86: LEED 2009 EBOM ACPs for ISO 50001. [view:embed_resource=page_1=4649821]
See all forum discussions about this credit »

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Frequently asked questions

To what degree is it necessary to follow the ASHRAE "Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits" document? Is this provided as a general guide or must it be followed precisely, using the ASHRAE forms and completing the audit using the ASHRAE methodology?

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Who can perform the ASHRAE Level II audit? Can it be done by someone in-house?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

My building is already very efficient and has an Energy Star score over 90. (Or, it's small and has passive systems.) How do I know if I’ve identified enough capital improvement measures? Is there a minimum requirement for improvement measures?

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What are the requirements for on-going Measurement and Verification (M&V)? How can our project meet this requirement without a BAS or sub-metering?

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See all forum discussions about this credit »

Addenda

5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

For a project originally certified under EBv2 pursuing recertification, is it acceptable to use the retro-commissioning project that was done under the previous certification to qualify for EBOM 2009 EAc2.1-2.3?

Ruling:

Previous commissioning activities that occurred within 5 years of the recertification performance period end date can contribute to achieving EAp1 and EAc2.1-2. For EAc2.3 the project team must demonstrate that key aspects of the initial commissioning tasks were performed during the two-year cycle that encompasses the LEED performance period. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project is requesting guidance on how EAc3 Enhanced Commissioning, as well as EAc5 Measurement and Verification, can be pursued for projects utilizing government-owned district energy systems that can\'t comply the requirements outlined in the LEED DES guidelines. Following the guidelines, projects that meet certain criteria cannot obtain points for EAc3 or EAc5 if they earn points for EAc1 Optimize Energy Performance but are unable to commission or meter upstream DES equipment.The project consists of a manufacturing facility located in China. The facility utilizes district steam for heating. The district energy plant is owned and operated by the government. The facility is greater than 50,000 sf and the district energy system will account for about 30% of the building\'s annual energy cost. In addition to this, the project would like to pursue points under EAc1.Following the "Treatment of District or Campus Thermal Energy in LEED V2 and LEED 2009-Design & Construction" guidelines, the project would not be able to pursue Enhanced Commissioning while earning EAc1 points without commissioning upstream equipment at the DES plant. The same requirements also prevent the project from pursuing credit EAc5 Measurement and Verification without including the DES plant.Due to the strict and undisclosed nature of the government in China, obtaining information and specific numbers on the energy performance and maintenance of the DES equipment would not be possible, making the Enhanced Commissioning of all district energy system equipment unfeasible. The same problem applies to credit EAc5.Even if the DES plant was owned by a utility company, it is unlikely the utility would give the project team all of required the information and allow them to perform the activities outlined in the DES guidelines. The guidelines appear to apply only to owner-operated DESs rather than utility or government-operated DESs. Projects that utilize most district energy systems are disadvantaged by not being able to earn a total of five Energy & Atmosphere points for these two credits. Given that DESs are typically employed because of the increased efficiencies realized through economies of scale and varied user demand schedules and are often more efficient than if the same facility were to operate with individual systems in isolation, we feel the current guidance places an inordinate onerous on government-owned/operated systems. Given the information above, can government-owned upstream equipment included in the district energy system be excluded from the scope of both EAc3 and EAc5 under the DES guidelines so that projects can earn points for EAc3 and EAc5 while earning points for EAc1? Also, the DES guidelines state that LEED v2009 projects are not formally required to use the guidelines. Can the project choose to not use the guidelines and earn points for EAc3 and EAc5 in addition to EAc1?

Ruling:

If a project team is following the "District or Campus Thermal Energy in LEED V2 and LEED 2009-Design & Construction" (DESv2) guidelines, the project may not exclude the District Energy System from the requirements of EA Credit 3 and EA Credit 5.However, as indicated in Section 1.2 of the DESv2 guidelines, "LEED v2009 projects are not formally required to use this guidance". Therefore, the project team may elect to opt out of the DESv2 guidance. If the project team does opt out of the DESv2 guidance, the district energy for EA Prerequisite 2 and EA Credit 1 would be modeled as indicated in the ASHRAE 90.1 Appendix G requirements, which state that purchased heating should be modeled in both the Baseline and Proposed Case systems. Furthermore, the upstream equipment would not be required to be accounted for in EA Credit 3 or EA Credit 5. Note that this methodology does not allow any credit for improved efficiency associated with upstream district energy equipment in EA Prerequisite 2 / EA Credit 1. Equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1 may be used.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
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Credit achievement rate

XX%

Upgrade to LEEDuser Premium to see how many projects achieved this credit. Try it free »

LEEDuser expert

David Hubka

LEED Fellow, WELL AP

Rivion
Director - Program Development

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USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

Option 1. Commissioning Process
  • Develop a retrocommissioning, recommissioning or ongoing commissioning plan for the building’s major energy-using systems.
  • Conduct the investigation and analysis phase.
  • Document the breakdown of energy use in the building.
  • List the operating problems that affect occupants’ comfort and energy use, and develop potential operational changes that will solve them.
  • List the identified capital improvements that will provide cost-effective energy savings and document the cost-benefit analysis associated with each.

OR

Option 2. ASHRAE Level II Energy Audit
  • Conduct an energy audit that meets the requirements of American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), Level II, Energy Survey and Analysis. [Europe ACP: EN 16247]
  • Document the breakdown of energy use in the building.
  • Perform a savings and cost analysis of all practical measures that meet the owner’s constraints and economic criteria, along with a discussion of any effect on operations and maintenance procedures.
  • List the identified capital improvements that will provide cost-effective energy savings and document the cost-benefit analysis associated with each.

Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

Europe ACP: EN 16247
Projects in Europe may use the energy audit procedure defined in EN 16247-2:2014 with a level of detail consistent with the scope of the credit. [view:embed_resource=page_1=4649824]
Credit substitution available
You may use the LEED v4 version of this credit on v2009 projects. For more information check out this article.
Pilot Alternative Compliance Path Available
This credit has an alternative compliance path available for the use of ISO 50001: Energy Management Systems. For more information see Pilot ACP 86: LEED 2009 EBOM ACPs for ISO 50001. [view:embed_resource=page_1=4649821]

XX%

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Got the gist of EAc2.1 but not sure how to actually achieve it? LEEDuser gives step-by-step help. Premium members get:

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  • Sample templates to help guide your narratives and LEED Online submissions.
  • Examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects.

To what degree is it necessary to follow the ASHRAE "Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits" document? Is this provided as a general guide or must it be followed precisely, using the ASHRAE forms and completing the audit using the ASHRAE methodology?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Who can perform the ASHRAE Level II audit? Can it be done by someone in-house?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

My building is already very efficient and has an Energy Star score over 90. (Or, it's small and has passive systems.) How do I know if I’ve identified enough capital improvement measures? Is there a minimum requirement for improvement measures?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

What are the requirements for on-going Measurement and Verification (M&V)? How can our project meet this requirement without a BAS or sub-metering?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

5/9/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

For a project originally certified under EBv2 pursuing recertification, is it acceptable to use the retro-commissioning project that was done under the previous certification to qualify for EBOM 2009 EAc2.1-2.3?

Ruling:

Previous commissioning activities that occurred within 5 years of the recertification performance period end date can contribute to achieving EAp1 and EAc2.1-2. For EAc2.3 the project team must demonstrate that key aspects of the initial commissioning tasks were performed during the two-year cycle that encompasses the LEED performance period. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
4/1/2012
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project is requesting guidance on how EAc3 Enhanced Commissioning, as well as EAc5 Measurement and Verification, can be pursued for projects utilizing government-owned district energy systems that can\'t comply the requirements outlined in the LEED DES guidelines. Following the guidelines, projects that meet certain criteria cannot obtain points for EAc3 or EAc5 if they earn points for EAc1 Optimize Energy Performance but are unable to commission or meter upstream DES equipment.The project consists of a manufacturing facility located in China. The facility utilizes district steam for heating. The district energy plant is owned and operated by the government. The facility is greater than 50,000 sf and the district energy system will account for about 30% of the building\'s annual energy cost. In addition to this, the project would like to pursue points under EAc1.Following the "Treatment of District or Campus Thermal Energy in LEED V2 and LEED 2009-Design & Construction" guidelines, the project would not be able to pursue Enhanced Commissioning while earning EAc1 points without commissioning upstream equipment at the DES plant. The same requirements also prevent the project from pursuing credit EAc5 Measurement and Verification without including the DES plant.Due to the strict and undisclosed nature of the government in China, obtaining information and specific numbers on the energy performance and maintenance of the DES equipment would not be possible, making the Enhanced Commissioning of all district energy system equipment unfeasible. The same problem applies to credit EAc5.Even if the DES plant was owned by a utility company, it is unlikely the utility would give the project team all of required the information and allow them to perform the activities outlined in the DES guidelines. The guidelines appear to apply only to owner-operated DESs rather than utility or government-operated DESs. Projects that utilize most district energy systems are disadvantaged by not being able to earn a total of five Energy & Atmosphere points for these two credits. Given that DESs are typically employed because of the increased efficiencies realized through economies of scale and varied user demand schedules and are often more efficient than if the same facility were to operate with individual systems in isolation, we feel the current guidance places an inordinate onerous on government-owned/operated systems. Given the information above, can government-owned upstream equipment included in the district energy system be excluded from the scope of both EAc3 and EAc5 under the DES guidelines so that projects can earn points for EAc3 and EAc5 while earning points for EAc1? Also, the DES guidelines state that LEED v2009 projects are not formally required to use the guidelines. Can the project choose to not use the guidelines and earn points for EAc3 and EAc5 in addition to EAc1?

Ruling:

If a project team is following the "District or Campus Thermal Energy in LEED V2 and LEED 2009-Design & Construction" (DESv2) guidelines, the project may not exclude the District Energy System from the requirements of EA Credit 3 and EA Credit 5.However, as indicated in Section 1.2 of the DESv2 guidelines, "LEED v2009 projects are not formally required to use this guidance". Therefore, the project team may elect to opt out of the DESv2 guidance. If the project team does opt out of the DESv2 guidance, the district energy for EA Prerequisite 2 and EA Credit 1 would be modeled as indicated in the ASHRAE 90.1 Appendix G requirements, which state that purchased heating should be modeled in both the Baseline and Proposed Case systems. Furthermore, the upstream equipment would not be required to be accounted for in EA Credit 3 or EA Credit 5. Note that this methodology does not allow any credit for improved efficiency associated with upstream district energy equipment in EA Prerequisite 2 / EA Credit 1. Equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1 may be used.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No

LEEDuser expert

David Hubka

LEED Fellow, WELL AP

Rivion
Director - Program Development

See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Unsubscribe from discussions about EBOM-2009 EAc2.1