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LEED v2009
Commercial Interiors
Energy and Atmosphere
Optimize Energy Performance—Lighting Controls

LEED CREDIT

CI-2009 EAc1.2: Optimize energy performance - lighting controls 1-3 points

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Sustainability Professional

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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

MANDATORY POINT MINIMUM: Project registered on or after April 8, 2016 must earn four points in this credit, but can come from any of the four sub-sections.
Design the project to include 1 or more of the following independent strategies:
  • Daylight controls for daylit areas: (1 point) Install daylight responsive controls in all regularly occupied daylit spaces within 15 feet (4.5 meters) of windows and under skylights. Daylight controls must switch or dim electric lights in response to the presence or absence of daylight illumination in the space.1
  • Daylight controls for 50% of the lighting load: (1 point) Install daylight responsive controls for 50% or more of the connected lighting load and demonstrate that 50% of the connected lighting load is daylight responsive. Daylight controls must switch or dim electric lights in response to the presence or absence of daylight illumination in the space.2
  • Occupancy sensors: (1 point) Install occupancy sensors for 75% of the connected lighting load.
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Frequently asked questions

What is included in the total connected lighting power?

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Does decorative lighting need to be connected to daylight sensors?

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Addenda

1/15/2016Updated: 4/7/2016
Form Update
Description of change:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/1/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
At the end of the section\'s text, add the following as a new paragraph:"To calculate the percentage of daylight responsive controls as compared to the connected lighting load, supplemental task lighting may be excluded from the total connected lighting power (though if supplemental task lighting is controlled by daylight responsive controls, it must be included). However, to calculate the percentage of occupancy sensor controls as compared to the connected lighting load, task lighting that is required to be accounted for in the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 lighting power density calculations (that is, lighting that is not exempt per Section 9.2.2.3) must be included in the connected lighting load."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/24/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project has an exterior canopy that wraps the building and projects 5\'-0" from the exterior glazing. The daylight responsive controls for our project will be installed within 10\' of the window glazing. In order to achieve this credit, do we need to install the controls 15\' from the edge of the exterior canopy or 15\' from the window glazing?

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification on the location of daylight responsive lighting controls to meet Credit EAc1.2 requirements. The credit requires that the controls be located within 15\' of the window glazing in all regularly occupied spaces. The exterior canopy provides shading for the glazing but is not considered as part of this dimension. Installing daylight control sensors within 10\' of the window glazing will meet this portion of credit requirements. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/1/2015
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Is there an adjusted point scale and minimum point threshold where applicable for LEED v2009 projects using ASHRAE 90.1-2010?

Ruling:

**July 1, 2016 update:This ruling has been revised to address the LEED 2009 minimum point requirement released 4/8/2016.**

Yes, LEED v2009 projects that demonstrate compliance using ASHRAE 90.1-2010 may utilize the adjusted point scale as shown in the Related Resource "ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Adjusted Point Scale for LEED v2009 Projects", subject to the following limitations:

• All mandatory provisions associated with ASHRAE 90.1-2010 (or an approved alternative standard) must be met in order for the project to use this compliance path.
• The ID+C thresholds shown are only relevant for projects using the Alternative Compliance Path described in LEED Interpretation 10412 that replaces the LEED 2009 requirements for EAp2, EAc1.1, EAc1.2, EAc1.3, and EAc1.4 with a Performance compliance path. All other ID&C projects would use the standard points available from EAc1.1 through EAc1.4 to comply with the 4-point minimum requirements.
• The CS 2009 EAp2-c1 ACP (http://www.usgbc.org/resources/cs-2009-eap2-c1-acp) may not be used in conjunction with this ASHRAE 90.1-2010 ACP. The project team must either use ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendix G with the CS 2009 EAp2-c1 ACP or use ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Appendix G without the CS 2009 EAp2-c1 ACP.

For projects that register on or after April 8th, 2016 and are subject to the mandatory Optimize Energy Performance point minimum:
If the project complies with all LEED v4 Minimum Energy Performance requirements for the relevant LEED v4 rating system, the project shall be considered to satisfy the LEED 2009 EA Prerequisite: Minimum Energy Performance mandatory minimum EAc1 points requirements (applicable for projects registered on or after April 8th, 2016), regardless of number of points achieved when applying this LEED Interpretation. The points documented under EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance shall be as shown in the ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Adjusted Points Scale for LEED v2009 for projects following the Performance Path, and zero for projects following a Prescriptive path.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/27/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This CIR is written to address the application of daylight responsive controls and the appropriate ways in which areas of a building can be excluded from this Credit. There are two rooms within the project that would be considered regularly occupied spaces, however the use of daylight responsive controls would not be appropriate. Both of these spaces do have exterior walls with windows and shades. The first space is a conference room, which will be used for a variety of meetings and presentations. The room will be equipped with AV equipment and therefore will require adjusting light levels accordingly. Therefore, the proposed design includes a complex dimming system with multiple schemes to allow for the necessary AV lighting level adjustment. The lights for the room will not operate when the room is vacant. One of the base lighting schemes will be set as the default scheme to operate once occupancy is sensed. We feel that the inclusion of daylight responsive controls would interfere with the occupant-chosen dimming schemes and is thus not appropriate in this room. The second space is a conference space/cafeteria. This space also has windows with operable shades and a line voltage dimmer. This is a large room that will be used for larger company meetings/presentations and for employee lunch and break purposes. The presence of daylight responsive controls would again interfere with the ability of the occupant to dim the space to their lighting needs. In summary: 1) We are requesting clarification on the definition of "regularly occupied spaces" within LEED-CI. 2) The intent of this CIR is to see areas such as the conference/cafeteria space described above would be an area acceptable to exclude from having daylight responsive controls. This is based on the ongoing potential for the daylight controls to interfere with the room\'s function. The lack of feasibility in conjunction with an occupant controlled dimmable system.

Ruling:

It is not acceptable to exclude the cafeteria and conference room spaces from the requirements of EAc1.2. The USGBC defines regularly occupied spaces as "areas where workers are seated or standing as they work inside a building." Both conference rooms and cafeterias fall under this description. In the "Design Approach for Daylight-Responsive Controls" section of the LEED-CI v2.0 Reference Guide description of EAc1.2, it is made clear that lighting control systems may have to deal with the combined logic of daylighting, occupancy sensors, and timed shut-off situations. Contemporary lighting systems are capable of handling both automated functions to reduce energy usage, and manual over-ride functions to allow for specific lighting level control, when needed. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
See all forum discussions about this credit »

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Credit achievement rate

XX%

Upgrade to LEEDuser Premium to see how many projects achieved this credit. Try it free »

LEEDuser expert

Glen Phillips

Bright Green
Sustainability Professional

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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

MANDATORY POINT MINIMUM: Project registered on or after April 8, 2016 must earn four points in this credit, but can come from any of the four sub-sections.
Design the project to include 1 or more of the following independent strategies:
  • Daylight controls for daylit areas: (1 point) Install daylight responsive controls in all regularly occupied daylit spaces within 15 feet (4.5 meters) of windows and under skylights. Daylight controls must switch or dim electric lights in response to the presence or absence of daylight illumination in the space.1
  • Daylight controls for 50% of the lighting load: (1 point) Install daylight responsive controls for 50% or more of the connected lighting load and demonstrate that 50% of the connected lighting load is daylight responsive. Daylight controls must switch or dim electric lights in response to the presence or absence of daylight illumination in the space.2
  • Occupancy sensors: (1 point) Install occupancy sensors for 75% of the connected lighting load.

XX%

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  • Examples of actual submissions from certified LEED projects.

What is included in the total connected lighting power?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

Does decorative lighting need to be connected to daylight sensors?

The answer to this question is available to LEEDuser premium members. Start a free trial »

(If you're already a premium member, log in here.)

1/15/2016Updated: 4/7/2016
Form Update
Description of change:
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/1/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
At the end of the section\'s text, add the following as a new paragraph:"To calculate the percentage of daylight responsive controls as compared to the connected lighting load, supplemental task lighting may be excluded from the total connected lighting power (though if supplemental task lighting is controlled by daylight responsive controls, it must be included). However, to calculate the percentage of occupancy sensor controls as compared to the connected lighting load, task lighting that is required to be accounted for in the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 lighting power density calculations (that is, lighting that is not exempt per Section 9.2.2.3) must be included in the connected lighting load."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
10/24/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project has an exterior canopy that wraps the building and projects 5\'-0" from the exterior glazing. The daylight responsive controls for our project will be installed within 10\' of the window glazing. In order to achieve this credit, do we need to install the controls 15\' from the edge of the exterior canopy or 15\' from the window glazing?

Ruling:

The project team is requesting clarification on the location of daylight responsive lighting controls to meet Credit EAc1.2 requirements. The credit requires that the controls be located within 15\' of the window glazing in all regularly occupied spaces. The exterior canopy provides shading for the glazing but is not considered as part of this dimension. Installing daylight control sensors within 10\' of the window glazing will meet this portion of credit requirements. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
7/1/2015
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Is there an adjusted point scale and minimum point threshold where applicable for LEED v2009 projects using ASHRAE 90.1-2010?

Ruling:

**July 1, 2016 update:This ruling has been revised to address the LEED 2009 minimum point requirement released 4/8/2016.**

Yes, LEED v2009 projects that demonstrate compliance using ASHRAE 90.1-2010 may utilize the adjusted point scale as shown in the Related Resource "ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Adjusted Point Scale for LEED v2009 Projects", subject to the following limitations:

• All mandatory provisions associated with ASHRAE 90.1-2010 (or an approved alternative standard) must be met in order for the project to use this compliance path.
• The ID+C thresholds shown are only relevant for projects using the Alternative Compliance Path described in LEED Interpretation 10412 that replaces the LEED 2009 requirements for EAp2, EAc1.1, EAc1.2, EAc1.3, and EAc1.4 with a Performance compliance path. All other ID&C projects would use the standard points available from EAc1.1 through EAc1.4 to comply with the 4-point minimum requirements.
• The CS 2009 EAp2-c1 ACP (http://www.usgbc.org/resources/cs-2009-eap2-c1-acp) may not be used in conjunction with this ASHRAE 90.1-2010 ACP. The project team must either use ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendix G with the CS 2009 EAp2-c1 ACP or use ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Appendix G without the CS 2009 EAp2-c1 ACP.

For projects that register on or after April 8th, 2016 and are subject to the mandatory Optimize Energy Performance point minimum:
If the project complies with all LEED v4 Minimum Energy Performance requirements for the relevant LEED v4 rating system, the project shall be considered to satisfy the LEED 2009 EA Prerequisite: Minimum Energy Performance mandatory minimum EAc1 points requirements (applicable for projects registered on or after April 8th, 2016), regardless of number of points achieved when applying this LEED Interpretation. The points documented under EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance shall be as shown in the ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Adjusted Points Scale for LEED v2009 for projects following the Performance Path, and zero for projects following a Prescriptive path.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
11/27/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

This CIR is written to address the application of daylight responsive controls and the appropriate ways in which areas of a building can be excluded from this Credit. There are two rooms within the project that would be considered regularly occupied spaces, however the use of daylight responsive controls would not be appropriate. Both of these spaces do have exterior walls with windows and shades. The first space is a conference room, which will be used for a variety of meetings and presentations. The room will be equipped with AV equipment and therefore will require adjusting light levels accordingly. Therefore, the proposed design includes a complex dimming system with multiple schemes to allow for the necessary AV lighting level adjustment. The lights for the room will not operate when the room is vacant. One of the base lighting schemes will be set as the default scheme to operate once occupancy is sensed. We feel that the inclusion of daylight responsive controls would interfere with the occupant-chosen dimming schemes and is thus not appropriate in this room. The second space is a conference space/cafeteria. This space also has windows with operable shades and a line voltage dimmer. This is a large room that will be used for larger company meetings/presentations and for employee lunch and break purposes. The presence of daylight responsive controls would again interfere with the ability of the occupant to dim the space to their lighting needs. In summary: 1) We are requesting clarification on the definition of "regularly occupied spaces" within LEED-CI. 2) The intent of this CIR is to see areas such as the conference/cafeteria space described above would be an area acceptable to exclude from having daylight responsive controls. This is based on the ongoing potential for the daylight controls to interfere with the room\'s function. The lack of feasibility in conjunction with an occupant controlled dimmable system.

Ruling:

It is not acceptable to exclude the cafeteria and conference room spaces from the requirements of EAc1.2. The USGBC defines regularly occupied spaces as "areas where workers are seated or standing as they work inside a building." Both conference rooms and cafeterias fall under this description. In the "Design Approach for Daylight-Responsive Controls" section of the LEED-CI v2.0 Reference Guide description of EAc1.2, it is made clear that lighting control systems may have to deal with the combined logic of daylighting, occupancy sensors, and timed shut-off situations. Contemporary lighting systems are capable of handling both automated functions to reduce energy usage, and manual over-ride functions to allow for specific lighting level control, when needed. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes

LEEDuser expert

Glen Phillips

Bright Green
Sustainability Professional

See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Unsubscribe from discussions about CI-2009 EAc1.2