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LEED v2009
Healthcare
Indoor Environmental Quality
Controllability of systems - lighting

LEED CREDIT

Healthcare-v2009 IEQc6.1: Controllability of systems - lighting 1 point

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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

For all occupants
Provide lighting system controls for all shared multi-occupant spaces to enable adjustments that meet group needs and preferences.

AND

For Staff Areas
Provide individual lighting controls for 90% (minimum) of the FTE staff (measured at peak periods) to enable adjustments to suit individual task needs and preferences.

AND

For Patient Areas
Provide individual lighting controls for 90% (minimum) of patients to enable adjustmentsto suit individual task needs and preferences. Install lighting controls that are readily accessible from the patient bed. In multi-occupant patient spaces, such as recovery rooms, emergency departments, infusion areas, and similar open areas, provide individual lighting controls. In private rooms, provide occupant controls that are readily accessible from the patient bed for exterior window shades, blinds, and/or curtains. Exempted areas include in-patient critical care, pediatric and psychiatric patient rooms. See all forum discussions about this credit »

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Addenda

11/1/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In alphabetical order, add the following definition for multi-occupant spaces, "Multi-Occupant Spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/1/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Replace the definition for group multioccupant spaces with the following definition for multi-occupant space, "Multi occupant spaces are places of egress, congregation, or where occupants pursue overlapping or collaborative tasks. Multi occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/1/2011Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
Revise the definition for individual occupant spaces to be, "In individual occupant spaces, occupants perform distinct tasks from one another. Such spaces may be contained within multi-occupant spaces and should be treated separately where possible. Individual occupant spaces may be regularly or non-regularly occupied spaces."
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
5/7/2007
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

The project team is providing individual floor air valves each with variable duration (open / close) primary air dampers and multi-position diffusers for occupant comfort conditioning as part of an under floor air distribution system. Individual floor air valves will be provided for a minimum of 50% of the building occupants. The variable duration (open/close) primary air dampers in the floor air valves will be controlled using thermostats. Multiple air valves will be connected to one thermostat, such that there will not be one thermostat for 50% of the occupants. However, all of the local floor air valves include multi-position adjustable floor diffusers which are integral to each floor air valve. At a minimum, 50% of the occupants will have control over the primary air flow direction out of the local floor air valve in their space (comfort zone) by adjusting the multi-position local floor diffuser air outlet. Changing the direction of the air flow inherently changes the speed of the airflow in a given direction. LEED NC v.2.2, First Edition, Reference Guide, p361, indicates: Conditions for Thermal Comfort per ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 include the following as primary factors: air temperature, radiant temperature, air speed, and humidity. The Reference guide also states that, "Comfort System control, for the purposes of this credit, is defined as the provision of control over at least one of these primary factors in the occupant\'s local environment" and that "Individual adjustments may involve individual thermostat controls, local diffusers at floor, desk or overhead levels, or control of individual radiant panels, and energy system design." This CIR is to confirm that providing air valves, with multi position diffusers, that allow more than 50% of the occupants to change the direction of airflow out of their floor diffuser (which changes the speed in that direction) will satisfy the LEED credit requirement for thermal comfort.

Ruling:

The applicant is asking whether multi position diffusers that allow changes in direction of airflow satisfy the requirements for individual comfort control for EQc6.2. The applicant is suggesting that changing the direction of airflow inherently changes the speed of the airflow in a given direction, meeting credit compliance by providing control of air speed. Simply changing the direction of airflow in one\'s workspace does not adequately meet the credit intent to provide individual comfort controls. Individual diffusers must have the ability to regulate the speed of the air leaving the diffuser, not simply the direction of airflow. Applicable Internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Requirements

For all occupants
Provide lighting system controls for all shared multi-occupant spaces to enable adjustments that meet group needs and preferences.

AND

For Staff Areas
Provide individual lighting controls for 90% (minimum) of the FTE staff (measured at peak periods) to enable adjustments to suit individual task needs and preferences.

AND

For Patient Areas
Provide individual lighting controls for 90% (minimum) of patients to enable adjustmentsto suit individual task needs and preferences. Install lighting controls that are readily accessible from the patient bed. In multi-occupant patient spaces, such as recovery rooms, emergency departments, infusion areas, and similar open areas, provide individual lighting controls. In private rooms, provide occupant controls that are readily accessible from the patient bed for exterior window shades, blinds, and/or curtains. Exempted areas include in-patient critical care, pediatric and psychiatric patient rooms.

LEEDuser expert

Kera Lagios

M.Arch, LEED AP BD+C, Assoc. IALD

atelier fos
Founder

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