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LEED v4.1

Existing Buildings

Indoor Environmental Quality
Green Cleaning

LEED CREDIT

EBOM-v4.1 EQc2: Green Cleaning 1 point

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SPECIAL REPORT

LEEDuser expert

Melissa Kelly

SPECIAL REPORT

LEEDuser’s viewpoint

Explore this LEED credit

Post your questions on this credit in the forum, and click on the credit language tab to review to the LEED requirements.

Credit language

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To reduce levels of chemical, biological, and particulate contaminants, which can compromise human health, building finishes and systems, and the environment, by implementing effective cleaning procedures.

Requirements

Interiors projects may select up to three options to earn up to 3 points.

Option 1. Custodial Effectiveness Assessment

Perform routine inspection and monitoring of the facility’s green cleaning policy to verify that the specified strategies are being used and to identify areas in need of improvement.

Additionally, conduct an annual audit in accordance with APPA Leadership in Educational Facilities’ Custodial Staffing Guidelines, or a local equivalent, to determine the appearance level of the facility. The facility must score 2.5 or better.

OR

Option 2. Entryway Systems

Have in place permanent entryway systems at least 10 feet (3 meters) long in the primary direction of travel to capture dirt and particulates entering the building at regularly used exterior entrances. Acceptable entryway systems include permanently installed grates, grilles, slotted systems that allow for cleaning underneath, rollout mats, and any other materials manufactured as entryway systems with equal to or better performance. Maintain all on a weekly basis.

Warehouses & Distribution Centers only
Buildings are not required to provide entryway systems at doors leading from the exterior to the loading dock/garage, but must provide them between these spaces and adjacent office areas.

Multifamily only
Common area entrances shall meet the requirements above. For residential units with a direct entrance to the exterior, have in place a walk off mat.

OR

Option 3. Powered janitorial equipment

At least 40%, by cost, of all powered janitorial equipment (purchased, leased, or used by contractors) used to clean the project meets the following criteria.

The equipment must have the following features:

  • safeguards, such as rollers or rubber bumpers, to avoid damage to building surfaces;
  • ergonomic design to minimize vibration, noise, and user fatigue, as reported in the user manual in accordance with ISO 5349-1 for arm vibrations, ISO 2631–1 for vibration to the whole body, and ISO 11201 for sound pressure at operator’s ear; and
  • as applicable, environmentally preferable batteries (e.g., gel, absorbent glass mat, lithium-ion) except in applications requiring deep discharge and heavy loads where performance or battery life is reduced by the use of sealed batteries.
  • Vacuum cleaners must be certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute Seal of Approval/Green Label Vacuum Program and operate with a maximum sound level of 70 dBA or less in accordance with ISO 11201.
  • Carpet extraction equipment, for restorative deep cleaning, must be certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute's Seal of Approval Deep Cleaning Extractors and Seal of Approval Deep Cleaning Systems program.
  • Propane-powered floor equipment must have high-efficiency, low-emissions engines with catalytic converters and mufflers that meet the California Air Resources Board or EPA standards for the specific engine size and operate with a sound level of 90 dBA or less, in accordance with ISO 11201.
  • Automated scrubbing machines must be equipped with variable-speed feed pumps and either (1) on-board chemical metering to optimize the use of cleaning fluids or (2) dilution control systems for chemical refilling. Alternatively, scrubbing machines may use tap water only, with no added cleaning products.

OR

Option 4. Cleaning products and materials

At least 75% of all cleaning products and materials, by cost must meet at least one of the following standards. Compliance may be demonstrated via a product inventory or from total annual purchases.

Cleaning products must meet one or more of the following standards, or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.:

  • Green Seal GS-37, for general-purpose, bathroom, glass and carpet cleaners used for industrial and institutional purposes;
  • UL EcoLogo 2792 for cleaning and degreasing compounds;
  • UL EcoLogo 2759 for hard-surface cleaners;
  • UL EcoLogo 2795, for carpet and upholstery care;
  • Green Seal GS-40, for industrial and institutional floor care products;
  • UL EcoLogo 2777 for hard-floor care;
  • EPA Safer Choice Standard; and/or
  • Cleaning devices that use only ionized water or electrolyzed water and have third-party-verified performance data equivalent to the other standards mentioned above (if the device is marketed for antimicrobial cleaning, performance data must demonstrate antimicrobial performance comparable to EPA Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics and Design for the Environment requirements, as appropriate for use patterns and marketing claims).

Disinfectants, metal polish, or other products not addressed by the above standards must meet one or more of the following standards (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.):

  • UL EcoLogo 2798 for digestion additives for cleaning and odor control;
  • UL EcoLogo 2791 for drain or grease trap additives;
  • UL EcoLogo 2796 for odor control additives;
  • Green Seal GS-52/53, for specialty cleaning products;
  • California Code of Regulations maximum allowable VOC levels for the specific product category;
  • EPA Safer Choice Standard; and/or
  • Cleaning devices that use only ionized water or electrolyzed water and have third-party-verified performance data equivalent to the other standards mentioned above (if the device is marketed for antimicrobial cleaning, performance data must demonstrate antimicrobial performance comparable to EPA Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics and Design for the Environment requirements, as appropriate for use patterns and marketing claims).

Disposable janitorial paper products and trash bags must meet the minimum requirements of one or more of the following programs, or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.:

  • EPA comprehensive procurement guidelines, for janitorial paper;
  • Green Seal GS-01, for tissue paper, paper towels and napkins;
  • UL EcoLogo 175, for toilet tissue;
  • UL EcoLogo 175, for hand towels
  • Janitorial paper products derived from rapidly renewable resources or made from tree-free fibers;
  • FSC certification, for fiber procurement;
  • EPA comprehensive procurement guidelines, for plastic trash can liners; and/or
  • California integrated waste management requirements, for plastic trash can liners (California Code of Regulations Title 14, Chapter 4, Article 5, or SABRC 42290-42297 Recycled Content Plastic Trash Bag Program).

Hand soaps and hand sanitizers must meet one or more of the following standards, or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.:

  • no antimicrobial agents (other than as a preservative) except where required by health codes and other regulations (e.g., food service and health care requirements);
  • Green Seal GS-41, for industrial and institutional hand cleaners;
  • UL EcoLogo 2784 for hand cleaners and hand soaps;
  • UL EcoLogo 2783 for hand sanitizers;
  • EPA Safer Choice Standard.

For projects outside the U.S., any Type 1 eco-labeling program as defined by ISO 14024: 1999 developed by a member of the Global Ecolabelling Network may be used in lieu of Green Seal or UL Ecolabel standards.

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LEEDuser expert

Melissa Kelly

USGBC logo

© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To reduce levels of chemical, biological, and particulate contaminants, which can compromise human health, building finishes and systems, and the environment, by implementing effective cleaning procedures.

Requirements

Interiors projects may select up to three options to earn up to 3 points.

Option 1. Custodial Effectiveness Assessment

Perform routine inspection and monitoring of the facility’s green cleaning policy to verify that the specified strategies are being used and to identify areas in need of improvement.

Additionally, conduct an annual audit in accordance with APPA Leadership in Educational Facilities’ Custodial Staffing Guidelines, or a local equivalent, to determine the appearance level of the facility. The facility must score 2.5 or better.

OR

Option 2. Entryway Systems

Have in place permanent entryway systems at least 10 feet (3 meters) long in the primary direction of travel to capture dirt and particulates entering the building at regularly used exterior entrances. Acceptable entryway systems include permanently installed grates, grilles, slotted systems that allow for cleaning underneath, rollout mats, and any other materials manufactured as entryway systems with equal to or better performance. Maintain all on a weekly basis.

Warehouses & Distribution Centers only
Buildings are not required to provide entryway systems at doors leading from the exterior to the loading dock/garage, but must provide them between these spaces and adjacent office areas.

Multifamily only
Common area entrances shall meet the requirements above. For residential units with a direct entrance to the exterior, have in place a walk off mat.

OR

Option 3. Powered janitorial equipment

At least 40%, by cost, of all powered janitorial equipment (purchased, leased, or used by contractors) used to clean the project meets the following criteria.

The equipment must have the following features:

  • safeguards, such as rollers or rubber bumpers, to avoid damage to building surfaces;
  • ergonomic design to minimize vibration, noise, and user fatigue, as reported in the user manual in accordance with ISO 5349-1 for arm vibrations, ISO 2631–1 for vibration to the whole body, and ISO 11201 for sound pressure at operator’s ear; and
  • as applicable, environmentally preferable batteries (e.g., gel, absorbent glass mat, lithium-ion) except in applications requiring deep discharge and heavy loads where performance or battery life is reduced by the use of sealed batteries.
  • Vacuum cleaners must be certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute Seal of Approval/Green Label Vacuum Program and operate with a maximum sound level of 70 dBA or less in accordance with ISO 11201.
  • Carpet extraction equipment, for restorative deep cleaning, must be certified by the Carpet and Rug Institute's Seal of Approval Deep Cleaning Extractors and Seal of Approval Deep Cleaning Systems program.
  • Propane-powered floor equipment must have high-efficiency, low-emissions engines with catalytic converters and mufflers that meet the California Air Resources Board or EPA standards for the specific engine size and operate with a sound level of 90 dBA or less, in accordance with ISO 11201.
  • Automated scrubbing machines must be equipped with variable-speed feed pumps and either (1) on-board chemical metering to optimize the use of cleaning fluids or (2) dilution control systems for chemical refilling. Alternatively, scrubbing machines may use tap water only, with no added cleaning products.

OR

Option 4. Cleaning products and materials

At least 75% of all cleaning products and materials, by cost must meet at least one of the following standards. Compliance may be demonstrated via a product inventory or from total annual purchases.

Cleaning products must meet one or more of the following standards, or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.:

  • Green Seal GS-37, for general-purpose, bathroom, glass and carpet cleaners used for industrial and institutional purposes;
  • UL EcoLogo 2792 for cleaning and degreasing compounds;
  • UL EcoLogo 2759 for hard-surface cleaners;
  • UL EcoLogo 2795, for carpet and upholstery care;
  • Green Seal GS-40, for industrial and institutional floor care products;
  • UL EcoLogo 2777 for hard-floor care;
  • EPA Safer Choice Standard; and/or
  • Cleaning devices that use only ionized water or electrolyzed water and have third-party-verified performance data equivalent to the other standards mentioned above (if the device is marketed for antimicrobial cleaning, performance data must demonstrate antimicrobial performance comparable to EPA Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics and Design for the Environment requirements, as appropriate for use patterns and marketing claims).

Disinfectants, metal polish, or other products not addressed by the above standards must meet one or more of the following standards (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.):

  • UL EcoLogo 2798 for digestion additives for cleaning and odor control;
  • UL EcoLogo 2791 for drain or grease trap additives;
  • UL EcoLogo 2796 for odor control additives;
  • Green Seal GS-52/53, for specialty cleaning products;
  • California Code of Regulations maximum allowable VOC levels for the specific product category;
  • EPA Safer Choice Standard; and/or
  • Cleaning devices that use only ionized water or electrolyzed water and have third-party-verified performance data equivalent to the other standards mentioned above (if the device is marketed for antimicrobial cleaning, performance data must demonstrate antimicrobial performance comparable to EPA Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics and Design for the Environment requirements, as appropriate for use patterns and marketing claims).

Disposable janitorial paper products and trash bags must meet the minimum requirements of one or more of the following programs, or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.:

  • EPA comprehensive procurement guidelines, for janitorial paper;
  • Green Seal GS-01, for tissue paper, paper towels and napkins;
  • UL EcoLogo 175, for toilet tissue;
  • UL EcoLogo 175, for hand towels
  • Janitorial paper products derived from rapidly renewable resources or made from tree-free fibers;
  • FSC certification, for fiber procurement;
  • EPA comprehensive procurement guidelines, for plastic trash can liners; and/or
  • California integrated waste management requirements, for plastic trash can liners (California Code of Regulations Title 14, Chapter 4, Article 5, or SABRC 42290-42297 Recycled Content Plastic Trash Bag Program).

Hand soaps and hand sanitizers must meet one or more of the following standards, or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.:

  • no antimicrobial agents (other than as a preservative) except where required by health codes and other regulations (e.g., food service and health care requirements);
  • Green Seal GS-41, for industrial and institutional hand cleaners;
  • UL EcoLogo 2784 for hand cleaners and hand soaps;
  • UL EcoLogo 2783 for hand sanitizers;
  • EPA Safer Choice Standard.

For projects outside the U.S., any Type 1 eco-labeling program as defined by ISO 14024: 1999 developed by a member of the Global Ecolabelling Network may be used in lieu of Green Seal or UL Ecolabel standards.

LEEDuser expert

Melissa Kelly

See all LEEDuser forum discussions about this credit » Unsubscribe from discussions about EBOM-v4.1 EQc2