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LEED v2009
Commercial Interiors
Materials and Resources

Building Reuse—Maintain Existing Interior Nonstructural Elements

LEED CREDIT

CI-2009 MRc1.2: Building reuse - maintain interior nonstructural elements 1-2 points

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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Requirements

Maintain at least 40% or 60% by area of the existing non-shell, nonstructural components (e.g., walls, flooring and ceiling systems). The minimum percentage interior component reuse for each point threshold is as follows:

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Addenda

2/1/2010Updated: 2/14/2015
Reference Guide Correction
Description of change:
In the last row of the table, replace "MR 1.2 but not MR 1.3" with "1 point but not 2" so the text becomes "40%
Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
6/8/2009
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

What defines \'finished floor\', \'finished ceiling\'. Example - the project we are working on was a former warehouse space converted to offices. The existing concrete slab remains intact, but we have selected a Shaw-Eco carpet to be installed over the slab. Is the slab considered a retained area or not because we are putting a new finish over it? Example - we maintained existing interior block walls but furred them out and put a new finish on due to their condition. Is that calculated as a retained area since it was not demolished? Example - we maintained the open exposed ceiling but painted it white for daylighting and lighting benefits. Is this still considered retained area? Please provide explicit guidance on how to deal with these calculations.

Ruling:

The project team is asking for clarification on how areas of specific items are to be dealt with in Finished Surface Area calculations. 1. An existing floor slab is considered part of the structure and should not be included in Finished Surface Areas calculations. The area of new carpet installed over the slab is to be included under Completed Design Area. 2. Since the existing wall was refinished, the finished square footage area should be included in the Completed Design Area column only. 3. Whether the existing exposed ceiling receives paint or not, the area of the retained exposed ceiling should be entered consistently under all three categories.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
5/13/2008
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

Our project is a Commercial Interiors project where our client is to occupy 3 floors of a new construct building. The landlord as part of his construction program has fitted out the tenancy floors with raised floor and ceiling tiles, however this was done to the landlord\'s specification without the input from our client (ie. outside of our client\'s CI scope of works). As part of the CI project, we have decided to retain and integrate the raised floor and ceiling tiles, therefore avoiding wastage etc. We have therefore followed the credit intent even though the ceiling and floor is new. Will reuse of the ceiling and flooring in this instance count towards this credit?

Ruling:

The intent of MRc1, Building Reuse, is to reuse existing building elements in a previously built-out space. As such, in the case described above in which the landlord has provided a raised floor and ceiling tiles in a newly constructed building, it is simply good design practice to integrate these elements as it will save in the cost of demolition, as well as the time involved with the removal of these materials. Therefore your approach is not acceptable to achieve the credit.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
No
11/1/2011
LEED Interpretation
Inquiry:

How do you account for previously exposed structures that are finished as part of the project?

Ruling:

Components contributing to MRc1.2 include finished ceilings, walls, doors, flooring, and built-in case goods. Components should be divided into 3 categories for calculation: Prior Condition, Completed Design, and Retained Components Area. Prior Condition includes the total finished area that existed before the project began, Completed Design in the total finished area in the completed design (including all new and retained elements), and Retained Components Area is the area of components listed above that were in the space under both Prior Condition and Completed Design. Previously exposed elements that were finished as part of the project should not be counted in the Retained Components Area since the original element was altered/added to during construction. For example, an unfinished ceiling covered with a lay-in ceiling after construction would not be able to contribute to credit. Applicable internationally.

Campus Applicable
No
Internationally Applicable:
Yes
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© Copyright U.S. Green Building Council, Inc. All rights reserved.

Intent

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Requirements

Maintain at least 40% or 60% by area of the existing non-shell, nonstructural components (e.g., walls, flooring and ceiling systems). The minimum percentage interior component reuse for each point threshold is as follows:

XX%

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